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Discussion Starter #1
I need to do some dent removal work on the J-curve (is that the right term?) on my bari and the only good way I can see getting it done is to unsolder the joints. I also need to straighten the body so was planning to build a mandrel out of a large piece of wood and unsoldering the top and bottom body joints to get in.

What do I need to know before I dive into this? My thoughts are that I might want to mark the rings and the body pieces in some way so that I can get it back together straight (probably a good thing!). I am planning to strip the lacquer and thought that it might be a good time to do it while it is dissected (easier to dip smaller pieces if necessary). I'm wondering what type of marks would survive the de-lacquering process. Is it necessary to mark things at all? What am I not thinking of (probably lots...)?
 

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Got an extra bari, or is this your only horn?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is my only bari but it is currently not in a playable condition. It was found in a dumpster and needs to be rebuilt.
 

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I would use a hobby knife with a very sharp point and made a very small line that lines up above and below the joint . This would be so slight that only if you know that it is there could you see it. When you put it back together just line up the lines. You can do this on two places.
 

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You may not need to mark out where the braces go as there'll be a solder mark there and very possibly they might already have the outlines of the brace feet marked or scribed on the joints when the solder was cleaned up. You might also want to consider fitting extra bracing to prevent the socket end getting bent in if it needs it.

When assembling, leave the top coil off completely so you can get a leak light straight down inside the main body section from the top end when you repad all the main body section keys (unless you're using a flexible leak light that goes round corners easily), then remove the palm keys (high D and Eb) so the pads don't get burnt and solder the top coil back on, then fit the high E, F and 8ve vent pads.
 

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What make is your bari?

Some baris don't have enough bracing at the socket end so the socket can be bent - B&S baris are an example as they have no bracing on the inside of the U or between the socket and the body to secure the socket, so it's always best to have bracing in both directions (at right angles to each other) so the socket doesn't move as that will cause problems with the 8ve mechanism.

Also make sure the case you use doesn't allow the weight to rest on the socket screw and Eb keyguard only (as many older cases do), so if that's the case, pack the inside back of the case out with cushions (high density foam covered in fabric will do) so the weight is being distributed evenly all down the back of the body section while it's being carried around in the case and make sure there's space between both the socket screw and Eb keyguard and the back of the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok, so I attempted to un-solder the top joints and braces tonight and...no luck! Does anyone have any advice for un-soldering this area where you have two braces and two body joints that are keeping things from moving? I know that I was getting it hot enough for the solder to melt because I saw it coming out of the joints (and I burned a little lacquer - oops! good thing it's getting stripped), but I couldn't get anything to let go. As soon as I took the heat off and tried to get anything to break loose I think it cooled off too much. Do I need to put things under tension as I am heating?

I admittedly have not done any soldering (or un-soldering) on a sax before, just wiring. I had a couple places where the key guards had come off and either left a pad of solder or a broken foot, so I practiced on those. I got a feel for how much heat it took to melt the solder through the metal and how fast it cooled, but I still could not get the upper sections apart.

Thanks for the help!

Ethan
 

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Ok, so I attempted to un-solder the top joints and braces tonight and...no luck! Does anyone have any advice for un-soldering this area where you have two braces and two body joints that are keeping things from moving? ...
Find some card board, the kind in the back of a legal pad or tissue box. Cut it into rectangles that are wider than the brace flange and a couple of inches long. The thin stuff, not corregated. Also find a pot holder/ welder's glove... Also get an assistant since you are a noobie and will need them to hold the torch after you heat the horn up. An experienced repairer can do this solo.

Heat the braces evenly so that the heat spreads through the brace flange and melts the solder. With the glove or pot holdered hand, lift up on the branch hard enough so that you can slide the cardboard between the brace and body. Once you get the braces loosened unsoldering the body joints will be easy. Be careful with the heat or many things can fall off. You may want to wrap damp clothes around areas that you don't want the heat to affect.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Got it! I heated the two braces on the upper curve and with a little leverage pressure from a wooden dowel as able to get the braces to let go. After that, like everyone said, it was pretty easy to get the body joints apart. It looked like there might have been a little rust or corrosion in some of the body joints, they were pretty hard to get apart, even when the solder was flowing.

Thanks for the tips!
 

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Now that you have it apart, take a look at Juan's post and pictures of the MKVI's that he is working on. You may not need to do the extensive key work he is doing, but I'm sure you will need to do the dent work. Dent work takes skill and practice as well as dent repair tools. Wooden dowels would not be my first choice of dent tools as you seemed to suggest you were going to use. Good luck with the repair. The difficult stuff is yet to come.
 

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Find some card board, the kind in the back of a legal pad or tissue box. Cut it into rectangles that are wider than the brace flange and a couple of inches long. The thin stuff, not corregated. Also find a pot holder/ welder's glove... Also get an assistant since you are a noobie and will need them to hold the torch after you heat the horn up. An experienced repairer can do this solo.

Heat the braces evenly so that the heat spreads through the brace flange and melts the solder. With the glove or pot holdered hand, lift up on the branch hard enough so that you can slide the cardboard between the brace and body. Once you get the braces loosened unsoldering the body joints will be easy. Be careful with the heat or many things can fall off. You may want to wrap damp clothes around areas that you don't want the heat to affect.
Neat trick mate. will give it a go on the next brace removal. I currently do it one handed with a cup of water, loosen the solder / pry apart / poor water to set solder and then do the other side. Problemis you get a bit of water on the floor which is not good or safe
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Good luck with the repair. The difficult stuff is yet to come.
Don't I know it!! I have learned that the dowel is not a great dent removal tool. I am currently making a dent rod and some threaded steel balls. I will take another look at Juan's project, the more ideas and help I can get, the better!

Ethan
 

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Heat the braces evenly so that the heat spreads through the brace flange and melts the solder. With the glove or pot holdered hand, lift up on the branch hard enough so that you can slide the cardboard between the brace and body.
Playing cards work good for this. You know, the ones you use for playing "cards". They are thin and strong.
 

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But not the solid plastic cards!

And what about the "plastic coated" ones?

Good cardboard though.... if it's cardboard. :)
 

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I was working in the overhaul shop for about 2 years disassembling tubas and sousaphones when one of the old timers showed me the carboard technique. I don't normally use it on "tiny" instruments like bari saxes. :) If you dampen the cardboard before you slide it under the brace, you can keep from burning it if you have a brace adjacent to the area that you need to remove.
 
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