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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Of course I've heard the original, and my favorite recording is this one with the Brecker Bros. But I was wondering if there are any tips on how to make the solo more interesting. The changes are good but after awhile its the same "oh he plays in F-7 for a bit, then lands on Eb in the next chord, then hits the C# on the next chord" that kinda thing. I'm just a highschool student, so I don't have a pro's grasp on theory, but I did find out I could play the #11 in the C#7 chord (btw all these tones are concert, I play alto). Idk if adding that sharp 11 (and playing F real minor) is a tritone substitution or not. I honestly have no clue WHAT a tritone sub is, but I can't remember whether playing that IS a tritone sub. I guess I should probably go figure that out first?

Also, any other killer solos on this song would be awesome! I have been trying to find some good recordings, like for instance Mike Brecker plays some out stuff on the recording I linked, thats a cool lick!

Josh
 

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Develop the intensity curve. Slow rhythmic density, like half and quarter notes, gets more intense as you increase the rhythmic density to eighths and sixteenths. Extreme high and low ranges increases intensity, so start in the middle of the horn. When you start feeling like F7 is a little blah, start in F, then play F# instead, and resolve back to F nicely. Play figures up and down in minor 3rds with disregard whether they fit the chords or not -- after the 3rd time through the form, the audience already has those well established in their ears, so contrast with them -- always resolving them. Pick a 3-4 note motif and base all your lines on developing that. Stuff like that should gradually build intensity; keep building til the last 2-4 bars and then quickly draw the intensity back down. It should generate audience interest, like you're taking them on a ride -- your ride.
 

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Administrator note:

I've delete the superfluous thread. As others have pointed out. SOTW rules do not permit cross posting of topics.
 

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Joe Henderson’s solo is one of the best.
 

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Joe Henderson’s solo is one of the best.
+1. That's one of my all-time favourite solos--so much barely restrained angst and affection threatening to break through. I've tried to learn it, but can never quite do it justice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've delete the superfluous thread. As others have pointed out. SOTW rules do not permit cross posting of topics.
I'm sure you'll get some good tips on this topic, but you've posted this same post in two different sections of the forum. I just saw it here (under 'Tips and Techniques'):

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...on-how-to-make-Song-for-my-Father-interesting

This results in a lot of overlapping responses and a certain amount of confusion. Not a good idea to do.
Sorry about that, I didn't know that was one of the rules. I won't make that mistake again! :)
 

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Here's a suggestion - play more musically. I like that tune, have played it thousands of times, never considered it boring. Think of your solo as a story, with a beginning, middle and end, and make sure the rhythm section comes along for the ride, it won't ever be uninteresting again :)

BTW, the end part is the most important - it's what your listeners will remember most, and it helps you to keep your solo short!
 

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+1 to skeller's post above.

Bottom line is all the factors that make a solo interesting come into play. Tension and release, dynamics, good melodic content, building gradually to a climax, strong ending, etc.

The song itself is beautiful and interesting, which is why it's become a standard.
 

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I’Lemon, are you playing this with a play along track, combo, or jazz ensemble? It makes a difference.

If you have room to stretch out, then take a couple choruses to build it up - you don’t have to blow like Brecker right out of the gate. On the other hand, if it is a big band chart where you only have one or two choruses, use them wisely. Listen to the backing: Is there a line from saxes or brass sections that provides an opportunity for call-and-response that you can exercise? What is going on in the rhythm section that you can relate to?

Your solo should be a living thing, and respond to the context of the arrangement and the vibe of the band.
 

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See how many ways you can change the melody rhythmically and note choice. Theres thousands of thing you can do with that. Also, if you play dynamics and time you'll sound very very good K
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I’Lemon, are you playing this with a play along track, combo, or jazz ensemble? It makes a difference.

If you have room to stretch out, then take a couple choruses to build it up - you don’t have to blow like Brecker right out of the gate. On the other hand, if it is a big band chart where you only have one or two choruses, use them wisely. Listen to the backing: Is there a line from saxes or brass sections that provides an opportunity for call-and-response that you can exercise? What is going on in the rhythm section that you can relate to?

Your solo should be a living thing, and respond to the context of the arrangement and the vibe of the band.
Yeah, I guess that seems to be the biggest factor here. I'll try to let go more and just close my eyes and let the sax do the work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here's a suggestion - play more musically. I like that tune, have played it thousands of times, never considered it boring. Think of your solo as a story, with a beginning, middle and end, and make sure the rhythm section comes along for the ride, it won't ever be uninteresting again :)

BTW, the end part is the most important - it's what your listeners will remember most, and it helps you to keep your solo short!
I’Lemon, are you playing this with a play along track, combo, or jazz ensemble? It makes a difference.

If you have room to stretch out, then take a couple choruses to build it up - you don’t have to blow like Brecker right out of the gate. On the other hand, if it is a big band chart where you only have one or two choruses, use them wisely. Listen to the backing: Is there a line from saxes or brass sections that provides an opportunity for call-and-response that you can exercise? What is going on in the rhythm section that you can relate to?

Your solo should be a living thing, and respond to the context of the arrangement and the vibe of the band.
I play it over a combo. Guitar, Bass, Piano and of course drums. I have really been meaning to up the amount of participation (call & response as you put it) that the backs have with the soloist. I just have a hard time getting my rhythm section to be brave enough haha. Of course for practice I use a backing track though. I will definitely work on some back and forth stuff with maybe the piano in my solo!
 

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Yeah, I guess that seems to be the biggest factor here. I'll try to let go more and just close my eyes and let the sax do the work!
Close your eyes, but not your ears! Listen to your band, as well as yourself.

Listen to hear if the things you play are what you intend. If not, figure out why and what to do about it.



P.S. The sax is not going to do any work without guidance from you.
 
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