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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I have played the clarinet for 21 years-6 years every day whilst learning, having weekly lessons and playing in numerous school bands, 13 years on and off and over the past 2 years I have taken it up again properly, playing in a Big Band.
I rehearse with the band once a week, perform throughout the year and try and practise at least once a week.
I don't really know what level I'm at-at a guess UK Grade 6-I gained my Jazz Grade 5 and GCSE in music at school with my clarinet.
At this moment, I can't afford regular lessons, so how can I maintain my standard?
I have bought different "play along" books with CD's at intermediate level, but it is easy to soon learn them!
Maybe perfect EVERY note on the clarinet? Do I need to know all my scales if I'm not bothered about exams?
Does anyone have any tips or am I doing enough?
 

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Like they say, there's nothing worse than being offered an opportunity and not be up to it. If I were you, I'd get a good scale book and work through them all so you're comfortable with all of the fingering patterns and the more common auxiliary fingerings. I use Baermann Book 3, but it's heavy sledding. Having all that under your fingers will make a surprising difference in your sight reading, and if another opportunity pops up, you'll be ready. If you want to perfect every tone and work on musicality, the Kroepsch (start VERY slowly) and Rose studies are good.
 

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The Klose Complete Method will also keep you busy for years.
Just looking at some of those exersizes is enough to make me cry, and I've been playing clarinet for 40 years. :)
 

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Yeah, some of them etudes are downright mean and ugly.

One of my favourite brain and finger twisters is to take some arbitrary tune I know by ear, and to play them in all twelve keys, each time a semitone higher or lower, at increasing speed.

If you feel like flagellating, do likewise with the Klosé licks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the ideas, I'll have a look for the books. Demnitz is good but I have had that one for 16 years and need something new lol.
 

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I'm thinking that knowledge of all scales and their arpeggios is essential, especially if you ever want to improvise. Playing written music or playing by ear usually requires one to play notes from all keys. I know it may be easy to explain away the need for all scales, but even tunes written/performed in the "normal" keys can include chord changes using the lesser-played scales/arpeggios. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm thinking that knowledge of all scales and their arpeggios is essential, especially if you ever want to improvise. Playing written music or playing by ear usually requires one to play notes from all keys. I know it may be easy to explain away the need for all scales, but even tunes written/performed in the "normal" keys can include chord changes using the lesser-played scales/arpeggios. DAVE
Yes, I think there's no getting away from the fact I need to learn them all again. Hated it with a passion as a teenager and consequently have forgotten an awful lot.
 

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Buddy DeFranco's "Hand in Hand with Hanon" is a great book for daily work. It is endorsed by Eugene Rousseau, Eddie Daniels, Ronnie Oldrich, Stanley Ducker, and Bunky Green. The book contains Hanon piano exercises transcribed in all keys for clarinet and wind instruments, plus basic studies for jazz improv. plus four jazz pieces with parts for piano, bass and drums. I've never gone much into the jazz pieces, but spend most time on the exercises. I pick one to play each day, memorize it, then transpose them myself. Been doing this for about 8 years now and still find it challenging, manoeuvring across the break in all keys, raising the tempo and trying to keep it consistent.
 

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Are there two separate Klose method books? I've seen reference to both 'The Celebrated Method' and 'The Complete Method'
but my local supplier believes them to be the same.
 

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There's a thick one, at least one version of it edited by Simeon Bellison, and a thin one. The thick one is better.
Are there two separate Klose method books? I've seen reference to both 'The Celebrated Method' and 'The Complete Method'
but my local supplier believes them to be the same.
 
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