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I am in desperate need of any and all tips you can give me about All Region. I'm a freshman high school bari player with little competition (for freshman All Region). I have to play two specific diatonic scales, the chromatic scale, and different cuts of all three etudes. Any tips at all could help me. Thank you all.
P.S - Freshman All Region is tomorrow!!!
 

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Don't mess up. G'luck tomorrow!
 

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Have a conservative game plan based on your abilities and stick to it (how fast will you take your scales and etudes). Also if certain ornaments on a slow etude are making you play out of time... you are better off disregarding them.
 

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I am in desperate need of any and all tips you can give me about All Region. I'm a freshman high school bari player with little competition (for freshman All Region). I have to play two specific diatonic scales, the chromatic scale, and different cuts of all three etudes. Any tips at all could help me. Thank you all.
P.S - Freshman All Region is tomorrow!!!
Goodluck man! From Texas Freshman to Texas Freshman (and I'm not just babbling I made All-state Jazz) here are some things that help me. For me, preparation is key, I guess it's little in the process for that but I feel like the more you prepare and the better you know your music, the higher your confidence will be and your nerves will be lessened.
Don't be intinimidated in the room. More than likely you will hear players that blow it out of the water and do some cool things (playing wise). Don't try to mimick something you hear done or try to do it faster because everyone else did. Play your audition and nobody else's. At my State recording, I heard a Junior tenor player play everything phenominally, but quite a bit faster than the marked tempo range and with a very unique sort of vibrato. I didn't copy his styling, I listened and appreciated, but I did only what I practiced and tried not to be affected by other people's audition. In the end, he ranked 6th in the state and I ranked 1st.
One thing that my band director suggested is playing with other people staring at you. It's sounds really strange but in band, he had people play their region music with other people staring at them and it was surprising how many great players completely folded when this happened. One time, he stood behind the music stand and swiveled the stand left to right slowly which was pretty hilarious because many couldn't focus anymore. Little things like that should help prepare you for what you'll feel in the room.

Always play the first note before actually started, it is in the rules that you are allowed to play your first note as a test note so make sure to take advantage of that.

Good luck! You'll do great!
 

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BTW, if you don't make it, don't be discouraged. To a certain extent, freshman all region is very much a coin toss. Since they pick such short and easy cuts, it's very difficult for judges to differentiate the "men from the boys". Take 9th grade region results with a grain of salt. In fact last year I know a girl that made All State on flute but didn't make freshman region, this is more common than you would think. In my region, the 2nd 9th grade region alto is 2nd chair in the bottom band (they have 3 bands) at her school.
 

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I judge the Maine All State audition each year and have heard a LOT of auditions. Here are 3 tips that will help you get a better score.

1.WORK HARD ON THE SCALES.... People often spend all their time working on the etudes and neglect the scales. There's no reason not to get a perfect score on the scales... these should be like free points!

2. DON'T PLAY TOO FAST.... you don't get extra points for speed, but you lose points for mistakes!

3. ESTABLISH THE TEMPO BEFORE YOU START.... it's very hard to play anything accurately if you don't have a tempo to follow, and the audition will not be like band class where your director is in front of you helping to keep the beat. Count each etude off to yourself before you start, and tap your foot while playing if you can.... It will make a big difference!

Good luck!
 

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I judge the Maine All State audition each year and have heard a LOT of auditions. Here are 3 tips that will help you get a better score.

1.WORK HARD ON THE SCALES.... People often spend all their time working on the etudes and neglect the scales. There's no reason not to get a perfect score on the scales... these should be like free points!

2. DON'T PLAY TOO FAST.... you don't get extra points for speed, but you lose points for mistakes!

3. ESTABLISH THE TEMPO BEFORE YOU START.... it's very hard to play anything accurately if you don't have a tempo to follow, and the audition will not be like band class where your director is in front of you helping to keep the beat. Count each etude off to yourself before you start, and tap your foot while playing if you can.... It will make a big difference!

Good luck!
I definitely agree 100% with 1 and 3. 2 I agree with to a certain extent. Do not play over the marked tempo range for sure, but at the same time, try not to play below it. At the State level, Texas is of the most competitive states in the country and most of the people who make it, play at the very top end of the tempo marking. That being said, they also can easily play it at that tempo without being sloppy or having rhythmic issues. In other words, if you can play it at the fast part of the range super cleanly and without any sort of slop you will wow the judges, if you can't do that, play it at the tempo you can play it at super comfortably and can nail 99.99999% of the time. This does not apply to the lyrical étude, play that as slow as you want (within reason) to show off your musicality. Play at the tempo you're very comfortable with, if you can blaze the 2nd étude at 116 without mistakes then by all means go for it, but if your not very confident about it, then don't try it, sloppiness and an uneven tempo will cost you way more points than speed can earn you!

The way Texas May be a little different from Maine is that Texas is wildly competitive. Not saying Maine isn't very competitive, but Texas and the West Coast are a step above most all state programs. This means at the state level, the wide majority can play the étude almost perfectly, cleanly, and musically. To the point where a large portion of the judging is simply personal preference. So in Texas (perhaps Maine idk) speed can often be the only deciding factor between two people with otherwise even scores. But like I said above, don't aim for speed alone, aim for a steady tempo and clear articulations and no finger slop, if you can accomplish all those things at a tempo the vast majority of the time, only then can you attempt to try it.
 

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I definitely agree 100% with 1 and 3. 2 I agree with to a certain extent. Do not play over the marked tempo range for sure, but at the same time, try not to play below it. At the State level, Texas is of the most competitive states in the country and most of the people who make it, play at the very top end of the tempo marking. That being said, they also can easily play it at that tempo without being sloppy or having rhythmic issues. In other words, if you can play it at the fast part of the range super cleanly and without any sort of slop you will wow the judges, if you can't do that, play it at the tempo you can play it at super comfortably and can nail 99.99999% of the time. This does not apply to the lyrical étude, play that as slow as you want (within reason) to show off your musicality. Play at the tempo you're very comfortable with, if you can blaze the 2nd étude at 116 without mistakes then by all means go for it, but if your not very confident about it, then don't try it, sloppiness and an uneven tempo will cost you way more points than speed can earn you!

The way Texas May be a little different from Maine is that Texas is wildly competitive. Not saying Maine isn't very competitive, but Texas and the West Coast are a step above most all state programs. This means at the state level, the wide majority can play the étude almost perfectly, cleanly, and musically. To the point where a large portion of the judging is simply personal preference. So in Texas (perhaps Maine idk) speed can often be the only deciding factor between two people with otherwise even scores. But like I said above, don't aim for speed alone, aim for a steady tempo and clear articulations and no finger slop, if you can accomplish all those things at a tempo the vast majority of the time, only then can you attempt to try it.
Totally agree! Just to clarify, I'm not suggesting to play the pieces under tempo, I'm saying that a common mistake with young players in an audition is to play above the marked tempo and sacrifice accuracy in the process. Often it's because of nerves, and sometimes it's in a an attempt to impress. I've heard many auditions where I came away thinking the student could have scored much higher if they hadn't let the tempo get away from them.
 

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See? You got it by not messing up! Congratulations!
 
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