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Hey guys,

With some friends we start to play dixieland jazz with the objective to play outside and fully enjoy this summer playing music outside !

we have been inspired a lot from tuba skinny recordings
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTainjvzeoI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jr7puCkoKCQ

and others
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSc1bhcYrpk


But we need some tips to play this kind of music. Especialy we noticed the different roles of each instrument, but we need some material to learn how to play it well, some kind of exercices or maybe books, youtube lessons, or even your personal tips or some references to analyse deeply.

Could you give me some help on this ?

Thanks in advance !
 

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Trumpet=melody,
clarinet=counter melody (virtuosic),
trombone=counter melody and concentrating more on bone charasteristics (slides),
tuba=roots and connecting notes,
rhythm chordal instrument (piano, banjo, guitar)=chord and rhythmic strumming,
percussion (drums, washboard, drum box)=rhythm.

Tuba Skinney's great to listen to. Actually, most of what you want (tunes, style, etc.) is right there. And it's free.
If I were you, I would just copy, by ear, exactly what they're doing. If you need, find the easiest tunes to play and remember and go from there.

Ref exercise/embellishment books, just use conventional counterpoint and classic embellishments (turns, passing tones, etc.). Like I said, just copy your "mentors" (Tuba Skinny).
 

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Exactly as gary said, but I would add the difference between the clarinet and trombone counter melody is the trombone less florid and more based just around chord tones. The characteristic slides glide between chord tones as opposed to the clarinet using more passing notes, scales, and blue notes. Mixture of wailing blues and virtostic stuff works well.

NB: my friends from new Orleans prefer to call the genre New Orleans Swing, the term Dixieland have some less pleasant connotations these days.
 

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Exactly as gary said, but I would add the difference between the clarinet and trombone counter melody is the trombone less florid and more based just around chord tones. The characteristic slides glide between chord tones as opposed to the clarinet using more passing notes, scales, and blue notes. Mixture of wailing blues and virtostic stuff works well.

NB: my friends from new Orleans prefer to call the genre New Orleans Swing, the term Dixieland have some less pleasant connotations these days.
Previous days, also -- at least to me .
 

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All the 'high' horns are playing the song at the same time, trying to not step on each other but still keep it alive. There is also a style of playing Dixieland on each instrument and pretty standard licks to learn, but it has to come from the heart. You have to immerse yourself in it. If all the players have to read charts, it is not going to have any life and will be a flop. I was playing in a Top 40 band with three horns, and we used to do it on 'Happy Birthday' when we had to play it. We took it at about 120 which is a lot peppier than HB usually is. Pretty funny to see a band playing Earth, Wind and Fire go into Dixieland 'Happy Birthday'. Its like watching the Symphony and suddenly they go into 'Johnny B. Goode' - a mind-twister!
 

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brulien: The music (many of us call it "trad jazz" or just "trad" in lieu of "Dixieland") sounds easy - but it isn't. I've been playing it for over 60 years and believe me, there is more to it than SAINTS and BILL BAILEY. But if your group can get it together, you will have a blast playing on the streets.

Gary stated the basics just fine. Now you have to make it sound good.

A good friend of mine, who played cornet in my L.A.-based band for years, moved to Paris and formed a street band called Richard Miller's RIVERBOAT SHUFFLERS. I joined them twice, once in a club in Paris, and then a few years ago, on the streets in Paris. These guys were GOOD and we drew large crowds that day. We did a number of Bechet and Bix tunes, had to disperse because of rain twice, then re-form twice to totally different large crowds. It was a day I'll never forget.

There are still trad-fans in France, and besides Sidney Bechet, France has put forth a couple of top-notch, world-class trad bands in the last several years . . . the HOT ANTIC JAZZ BAND from Nimes, and CHARQUET & CO. from Paris. CHARQUET is no longer using that name but many of the same players are now called THE KINGS OF FOXTROT.

Another sensational clarinetist in your area is Alain Marquet who I last heard was playing with a group called PARIS WASHBOARD. Marquet used to play with Charquet - an absolute monster on clarinet. He borrowed my clarinet to do a show in Santa Monica several years ago after his horn was stolen in NYC.

Trad comes from the heart, not charts (although good chord charts are often used by rhythm section players). Listen to Armstrong, Bechet, Bix, King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton, Turk Murphy, and the Firehouse Five plus Two. Sure, there are many more, but those recordings should give you a good foundation for the tunes and the style. DAVE
 

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Previous days, also -- at least to me .
Yes, I can imagine it goes rioght back further than when people first started calling it Dixieland instead of just jazz. To 1917, Original Dixieland Jazz (Jass) band. Even then probably offended people but they didn't care.
 

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In this day and age, the term "Dixieland" has a connotation of old guys in striped vests and straw boaters playing corny music for drunken conventioneers and Shakey's Pizza customers. There's a lot more to the music than that.

Not that I wouldn't take a gig wearing a striped vest and a straw boater playing trad for drunken conventioneers.
 

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Someone already put this one up, but it is the Rosetta Stone for Dixieland performance. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EadpcjMB_2s
Dead right! Everything you need for New Orleans Swing is right here. Evan Christopher is a wonderful clarinet player — and he's very, very serious about New Orleans music. Check out his clarinet: he's not playing an R13 Boehm system — he's got a Selmer "three-in-a-row" Albert system. It's a top-of-the-range model, made around 1930, but so clean and shiny it looks as if it was made yesterday. This is the clarinet model you'll see in photos of Johnny Dodds and Barney Bigard — the best clarinet ever made, according to New Orleans players, and they're very very hard to find nowadays.

As well as being a great musician, Evan is a great teacher: anyone interested in New Orleans Swing should listen closely to this YouTube clip. Thanks, lutemann for referencing it !
 

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In this day and age, the term "Dixieland" has a connotation of old guys in striped vests and straw boaters playing corny music for drunken conventioneers and Shakey's Pizza customers.
I see this sort of thing as a reason to aggressively refuse to pander to ignorance by conceding the language. I will always refer that style as Dixieland, just as I will always refer to anyone born in Florida as a Cracker.
 

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I see this sort of thing as a reason to aggressively refuse to pander to ignorance by conceding the language. I will always refer that style as Dixieland, just as I will always refer to anyone born in Florida as a Cracker.
Well, you probably won't get punched out by calling New Orleans style jazz "Dixieland"; but I would be careful about the other one.
 

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Dead right! Everything you need for New Orleans Swing is right here. Evan Christopher is a wonderful clarinet player — and he's very, very serious about New Orleans music. Check out his clarinet: he's not playing an R13 Boehm system — he's got a Selmer "three-in-a-row" Albert system. It's a top-of-the-range model, made around 1930, but so clean and shiny it looks as if it was made yesterday. This is the clarinet model you'll see in photos of Johnny Dodds and Barney Bigard — the best clarinet ever made, according to New Orleans players, and they're very very hard to find nowadays.

As well as being a great musician, Evan is a great teacher: anyone interested in New Orleans Swing should listen closely to this YouTube clip. Thanks, lutemann for referencing it !
I just found these videos from Lincoln Center Jazz. They look really good, and I saw that video just last night.

I wonder if there are others on the N.O. Swing style. You are right, Mr. Christopher does a really good job of explaining and illustrating. Not everyone knows how to do that.
 

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A rose by any other name . . .

But these labels, sometimes misnomers, tell consumers where to begin their google, cheap bin, record store, YouTube etc. searches. I find it helpful as long as you simply use it as a tool. But to fight over the boundaries, making it mean more than it does, is, to me, a waste of time.
 

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I see this sort of thing as a reason to aggressively refuse to pander to ignorance by conceding the language. I will always refer that style as Dixieland, just as I will always refer to anyone born in Florida as a Cracker.


https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/07/01/197644761/word-watch-on-crackers

for those unfamiliar with the term.

List of famous people born in Florida


Julian Cannonball Adderley jazz saxophonist, Tampa.
Pat Boone singer, Jacksonville.
Fernando Bujones ballet dancer, Miami.
Steve Carlton baseball player, Miami.
Howie Dorough singer, Orlando.
Fay Dunaway actress, Bascom.
Stepin Fetchit comedian, Key West.
Dwight Gooden baseball player, Tampa.
Jim Morrison singer, Melbourne
Osceola Seminole, Indian leader
Sidney Poitier actor, Miami
A. Philip Randolph labor leader, Crescent City
Janet Reno attorney general, Miami
David Robinson basketball, Key West
Joseph W. Stilwell army general, Palatka
Don Sutton baseball player, Pensacola
Norman E. Thargard astronaut
Ben Vereen actor, Miami
 
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