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Sorry for the very basic question, but I just wanted to clarify something. When one gets the same brand of mouthpiece, but gets a bigger tip opening of the same mouthpiece, what exactly changes? I know the piece has the ability to play louder and be pushed more, but that a stronger embouchure is required. But what happens to the tone? I have heard some people say that the tone becomes edgier, but others claim the tone stays exactly the same. What is the correct answer to this question? For example if I instead of playing a Meyer 6 I picked up a Meyer 7, what exactly would change tonewise? I’m sorry if this question has already been answered, but if it has please do not get annoyed with me. I didn’t find what I was looking for with the search function.
Thanks in advance,
-Benji
 

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The tip opening is the measurement of the gap between the tip of the reed and the tip of the mouthpiece, commonly measured in thousandths of an inch.

Pete Thomas's web site has a good diagram that shows the difference parts of a mouthpiece very well.

The majority of the tone actually comes from the internal dimensions and shape of the mouthpieces chamber and baffle rather than from the size of tip opening, so overall tone isn't as greatly effected by changing the tip opening as by changing the dimensions or shape of the baffle or chamber, but it does have a lot to do with control and volume.

However... you've also got to consider the mouthpiece as an entire unit, so changing the size of tip opening may also change the way the air flows over the baffle and through the chamber, so it may therefore have an effect and the amount of effect may vary for different mouthpiece designs (eg I can see how it might make a bigger difference in a large baffle/small chamber design). I don't think it's a straightforward "its' always like this" answer.
 

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I think you'd notice a difference, but few others would hear it.

I have several mouthpieces of the same brand and model with the only thing being the tip-openings which are different (soprano S-80's, alto Meyers, and most recently soprano Morgan Vintage pieces). The more open, the fuller the sound for me.

As far as edge or difficulty, that is most likely in the selected reed. DAVE
 

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About a year ago I mentioned a teacher I had in college who kept a Selmer C*, C**, D and E and matched the mouthpiece to the reed or the room. Interesting concept as chamber and feel are the same but the tip can be "changed".
 
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