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Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
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Discussion Starter #1

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Distinguished SOTW Columnist/Official SOTW Guru
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These are fantastic! I use these and many other exercises Tim gave me, every day. The slower you can do these the better. Everyone seems to treat long tones as something to be gotten out of the way before the serious practice of licks and patterns begins but if you dedicate yourself to these studies, the pay off is huge. Listen to any of the greats on a simple MELODY.


Long tones baby.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
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6,260 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Why this pitches organization?
This started as a tone row that English saxist and friend Tony Coe faxed me. I noted that at that point I was checking out/studying 12 TONE music, that the hardest part of the rows to
come up with...was hearing them.

SO, I turned it into a "Long Tone Study" to lock it into my sub-conscious. Tony gave me a few, I had some from a Arnold Schoenberg course I was studying as well in NYC.

As it goes, I walked into the Village Vanguard one night & heard Joe Henderson and stayed all night listening to his trio. ( Geo Mraz, and Al Foster with Joe )
I remembered the things Joe played as trademark harmonic tools for years (McCoy too ), stuff like you appreciated F major 7th w/ a flat 5... over a B min 7 flat 5 or try a D minor or G 7 or sus. Pretty interesting too. But the key with anything is to hear it- EG-In Indian music you got to sing the scales as an exercise as well. HENCE-My Long Tones. :)
The more you THINK about this kinda stuff the more you can HEAR it. TO HEAR IS TO SEE :)

HTH.
 

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This started as a tone row that English saxist and friend Tony Coe faxed me. I noted that at that point I was checking out/studying 12 TONE music, that the hardest part of the rows to
come up with...was hearing them.

SO, I turned it into a "Long Tone Study" to lock it into my sub-conscious. Tony gave me a few, I had some from a Arnold Schoenberg course I was studying as well in NYC.

As it goes, I walked into the Village Vanguard one night & heard Joe Henderson and stayed all night listening to his trio. ( Geo Mraz, and Al Foster with Joe )
I remembered the things Joe played as trademark harmonic tools for years (McCoy too ), stuff like you appreciated F major 7th w/ a flat 5... over a B min 7 flat 5 or try a D minor or G 7 or sus. Pretty interesting too. But the key with anything is to hear it- EG-In Indian music you got to sing the scales as an exercise as well. HENCE-My Long Tones. :)
The more you THINK about this kinda stuff the more you can HEAR it. TO HEAR IS TO SEE :)

HTH.
thank you for the explanation :)
 

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Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
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6,260 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
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