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Oh, guess this is gonna be a tough one for me. I hope you will understand what i mean.

I have a new CB hotspur alto. Great horn. Yesterday I looked in the inside of the necks. On the side where the cork is, there I can see a thread/furrows in the inside of the neck. It'S on both necks. Do you know, if that is suppose to be or what.

I know, that Selmer makes Booster necks, but there it is on the other side of the neck.

If it is correct to have these thread/furrows there, what are they for? Is it that the airflow is better?
 

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The irregularities inside the neck are a trademark of the Cannonball saxes and yes it is made to be that way. I don't know the physics or acoustics well enough to explain why, but through experimentation they found that the tone and response of their saxophones was enhanced by making the inside bore of the neck more of a "rough" surface.
 

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Funny, I was just looking at some Cannonball saxes during my lunch break, and noticed the same thing about their necks. It appeared to me that the rough surface in the first 1.5 inches or so of the neck was purposely put there. The interior surface beyond the first 1.5" is smooth.

I also noticed that the inside edge of the neck pipe is chamferred (beveled for a smooth transition). I thought that was neat.
 

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Perhaps they're rifled so you can play faster?
 

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If anyone has a photo or can take one then I'd be interested to see it. I've seen the Selmer rings and the alto P Mauriat Jazz VI neck has something similar as well.
 

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this is definitely on purpose, and cannonball didn't always do this. I have an older tenor of theirs, and i was having problems with it as i grew as a player. There were some pretty significant intonation issues, stuffy in the G-A range, and lower altissimo notes were damn near impossible to get a good sound on. I sent the horn back to them after playing it for over 3 years after email correspondence with Tevis where he said that they had discovered alot of new techniques since making this horn, and that he would apply some of them if i shipped him my horn. The first thing i noticed when it arrived was that the first few inches of the neck were rougher than before, and apparently the process had left behind some loose metal shavings, because a good bit came out when i cleaned it.

What were the effects of this? Well, i'm still playing the same horn for one. It is a different animal now, and while i still don't think it's THE horn for me, it's doing its job very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I will try to take a good picture of it tomorow. It looks like the outside of a screw, just that it is in the inside of the neck.
I thought it was there on purpose, since it is very accurat and regular. I cannot see, how manch inches it goes into the neck. My pinky finger is to big to get that far into the alto neck. Maybe it is easier with a tenor neck.
I'D guess it es as far down as the cork is on the outside. Maybe it brings the airflow into a certain rotation, so that the horn will respond or intonate better. Don't know. I will ask Sheryl.
 

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would you have to thread the other direction for use below the equator? did you know that toilets and sinks will drain counter clockwise below the equator ??
 

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he who cannot be named has been threading necks for years. he also advocates threading the octave pips.
 

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Thanks for taking these photos, it's very interesting
 

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I'm not sure how much of this applies to this discussion, but here is a portion of the text from "The Saxophone is My Voice" by Ernest Ferron.

Ferron said:
"Saxophones generally come with the outside polished like a mirror. The same is not true for the inside of the bore, whose surface granulation varies according to the characteristics of the metal and the way that it was worked. This grain determines the thickness of a 'boundary layer' which adheres to the wall of the bore. What is called a "boundary layer" is the thin layer of air which sticks to the surface of an object exposed to air. Thus, an airplane which takes-off with dust on the wings, will land with the same dust.

The boundary layer vibrates like the wall of the instrument, not like the air-column.......When the boundary layer is relatively thick, the instrument sounds flat and muffled and the response is poor. However, experience shows that some instruments are 'better' and more 'flexible' with a slightly grainy bore. Instrument makers have long known that over polishing a saxophone neck or bow can in some cases create instability or destroy an instrument's personality."
He goes on to say that extremely poor maintenance of your saxophone will cause the biofilm layer to build up and give the musician the impression that it is "broken in". So folks if your saxophone sounds boring, just stop cleaning it and you can improve its personality. :)

I am not certain, but the Cannonball folks may be using these "swirls" to increase the boundary layer of air in the neck which would increase the loss of energy in the sound wave with the weaker higher frequencies being affected more than the relatively stronger low frequencies. Maybe "Kymarto" can shed some more light on this interesting topic.

I don't think a call to their main office would produce any more detail than, "Through experimentation we found that the saxes play better when we do this to the necks." More detail than that would probably be in the realm of proprietary information.

John
 

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i noticed the same thing with my older BBGS tenor when i got it years ago. The inside of the neck was not as "rifled" as the pics above, but they used a, for lack of better analysis, metal brush spun at speed and roughed up the inside of the neck. many of the taiwan horns are super smooth on the inside.

Many of the older hand made necks (Selmer, JKs) have a texture to them on the inside from hand hammering I would surmise

and from what i gathered in the past it affects the tonal characteristics as JBT alluded too.
 

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I noticed this thread and ran for my case. I too have that "rifled barrel" neck. Although both my regular and "FAT" neck have it, it seems more pronounced on the "FAT" neck. Should we e-mail/snail-mail Tevis to see if we can get an answer?
 

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This is from Kessler's page on Selmer aftermarket necks:


Booster Design
Perfected by the research-development department SELMER-Paris, the "Booster" offers a different neck making (creation of a spiral groove on the inside tenon of neck). This different surface state gives a different way to blowed air - a focused sound, more developed on left hand and for very high-pitch sounds. A broad and rich tone.

Originally only available on the Series III soprano, this design has become available on Series III necks throughout the instrument lineup.

Some pretty awkward english there, but it seems to indicate that it gives a more focussed sound.
 

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The book "The Saxophone is My Voice" also gives detail about how every saxophone note corresponds to certain spot inside the neck.

When I first read that, I looked inside the neck of my son's BB Global Series and I thought it must be what Cannonball's claim of "Customizing each neck".

It's a good book to read.
 

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Thread or furrows inside of CB necks

I checked my Mad Meg Big Bell Global Series alto and tenor saxes. They do have some swirles like a rotary tool had done something in there for the first one and a half inches. On all of my four necks the swirles are light and are like smoothing out the surfaces, not deep or rough as in the above pictures. My saxes are around 3-4 years old.
 
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