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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I am looking at getting a Yamaha YFL371 open hole flute mainly to be used for doubling in the pits. Anyone got any thoughts on this, has anyone had any experience with these flutes? Also, does anyone know of something better, or that may be more suitable for a similar price?

Regards
 

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Distinguished SOTW Technician.
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I have one & its great, plays well right througout, silver head, low B , gold lip plate.Its the best considering what it cost me....
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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Save your money. Go for a 225, or 211 (with split E). You are unlikely to need the low B. The silver head makes no difference other than marketing. And the open holes are most likely to be a nuisance; they do not alter the way it plays.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gordon, I'm just thinking, doesn't having the low B and open holes increase the resale value in the future? And I thought that a silver head affected the overall tone of the instrument, at least that's what I've been told?
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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1. I know nothing about resale value in another country. But if you buy second hand, you have pretty well nothing to lose. Student Yamahas take decades to wear out, and cosmetics usually remain remain good unless the surface is abused.

2. The sound of a flute is produced by the vibration of the air column, not the metal.The vibrating air column does not ask its container what metal it is made from. Acoustic scientists know that the material is irrelevant other than it contribution to the surface texture of the bore. Double blind tests, as robust as possible, using discerning listeners, have backed them up. What you have been told ha come from the marketers of flutes, who want to charge you for precious metals, at many times what the metal is worth. So why should anybody give more credence to what you have been told, than to reliable sources?

I was once brainwashed like you, but the more flutes I actually tried, with silver and non silver option heads of the same cut, the more I realised it was BS.
 

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Gordon, I'm just thinking, doesn't having the low B and open holes increase the resale value in the future? And I thought that a silver head affected the overall tone of the instrument, at least that's what I've been told?
I will try to answer your questions.

1. Yes, I think you will find more potential buyers for an open-hole, B-foot flute.
2. The answer is probably no, all else being equal. (All else is not usually equal. Mass-produced student headjoints tend to be silver-plated, while hand-made or otherwise higher quality headjoints are usually solid silver. So, in general, solid silver headjoints play better than student headjoints.)
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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I'd put that slightly differently: Yes, hand makers of heads, who (hopefully) put some real effort into design, usually happen to choose silver or gold to work with. (Partly because it's easier to work with! And partly because buys are more prepared to pay exorbitant prices for these metals!)
There are definitely exceptions. And many silver heads are not hand made. I very much doubt that the heads on the Yamaha 300 series are.

And some silver plated student heads are spectacular compared with some, poorly designed, sterling silver heads.
 

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If you're not used to open holes it's a waste of money. They don't make a difference in sound.
If you're only going to double on flute in the pit.... Open holes are best plugged.
Save yourself the agrivation and get a nice closed hole flute with an offset G.

I play in the pit. I have an open hole flute with an inline G and a B foot.
At home the holes are left open. In the pit... The holes are PLUGGED. I'm reasonably proficient but I'm not taking any chances with my performance.
When you only have 8 counts to swap from clarinet/sax/whatever to flute you don't have time to worry about if you are getting all of the stupid holes covered.
You only have time to get the horn to your face and start blowing.
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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Especially when that 8 counts is only 4 or 5.
 
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