Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
5,160 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Not sure that this is a "Pro" thing but it's anyone out there gigging on a regular basis.

Wednesday I had a gig and everything just worked. Good Reed, Sound, Hands felt great, ideas were popping off the horn, lighting was great to see whatever charts I needed. Really positive vibe. Left the gig on top of the world.

Thursday, same group but everything went the other direction. The reed I used Wednesday suddenly seemed way too soft, everything was loud, the lighting was weird and something was going on with my glasses so charts were fuzzy, sound system seemed to have really strange EQ, and improvisation was not flowing at all. Just one of those gigs. Left the gig not on top of the world. :(

It's all good, I just have to work for consistency and mental toughness to make it happen regardless of the situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,715 Posts
I find for me it often is related to the time of day the gig is. I'm pretty high-energy morning through early afternoon. I often practice in the morning before I go down to teach class and so when I have the occasional brunch or lunch gig I play really well. Playing gigs that go 10PM - 1AM are rarely great for me. You do get stronger mentally the more you do it I'd agree. There was a time when we were playing 8-midnight or 9/10-1 about every other weekend and eventually I got used to it and could get through that last set still playing well. Now we're playing more events, festivals, weddings, etc., and fewer bar/club gigs so when we do that last set is always a bit of a push.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,793 Posts
Not sure that this is a "Pro" thing but it's anyone out there gigging on a regular basis.

Wednesday I had a gig and everything just worked. Good Reed, Sound, Hands felt great, ideas were popping off the horn, lighting was great to see whatever charts I needed. Really positive vibe. Left the gig on top of the world.

Thursday, same group but everything went the other direction. The reed I used Wednesday suddenly seemed way too soft, everything was loud, the lighting was weird and something was going on with my glasses so charts were fuzzy, sound system seemed to have really strange EQ, and idea were just not flowing at all. Just one of those gigs. Left the gig not on top of the world. :(

It's all good, I just have to work for consistency and mental toughness to make it happen regardless of the situation.
Yeah, when it goes bad that stinks. I learned years ago that I never drink enough water and often get dehydrated. When it is bad, it affects my hands and my vision. Sometimes it seems like it even affects my hearing. Now I try to drink a lot of water each day. I'm not saying that is what happened to you but I notice it with me..........
 

·
The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum
Joined
·
27,650 Posts
Ironically the best I played was on a horrible winter night where it was so bad (Germany so they know) that attendance was sparse. It was a monthly jam session so it wasn't even mandatory, and I thought about passing on it but changed my mind at the last moment. Nobody on the streets. Everything worked well for me and I even got a write up in the paper the next day, LOL.

(About "professional" gigs, I played regularly at a place named "The Irish House [also Germany] and I always felt fulfilled and especially enjoyed the countryside drive home in the middle of the night, listening to mellow music on the CD player.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,262 Posts
I should have a gig tonight, but yesterday while rehearsal i got gallbladder problems so I'm in hospital. The keyboarder forgot his stage piano and the drummer locked his car with drums and keys in it.
Not kidding......
But I think, if (!) Everybody's on stage, this should be a very funny gig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
Well, it's not *only* a pro thing. Some of us occasional weekend warriors get it, too. I think it's partly because when you're playing with a group of people, things do tend to snowball. It's like yawning. If someone makes an obvious mistake, it's like it shakes the confidence of the whole band and suddenly everybody's messing up. Or it can go the other way: you can have a solo where everything somehow falls into place, and suddenly everybody's in the zone and playing really well. Even though I don't gig that much, I've definitely noticed that there are times when you know by the second song "this is going to be a great night," and times when you know it's not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I am very sure, that everybody, pro or not, has made and still makes the experience, that some days are great and others are less.
One very big thing, at least to my experience, is the whole band. Not one person alone. If the band (all members) is grooving/swinging and listening then it will become a great gig. But sometimes the concentration is not as good as the other day (bad night, wheather, accoustic of the room, ...).

BTW: It took me several year not to spoil a whole evening, because I just started the gig with a horrible solo ;)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2008
Joined
·
1,012 Posts
Yeah, when it goes bad that stinks. I learned years ago that I never drink enough water and often get dehydrated. When it is bad, it affects my hands and my vision. Sometimes it seems like it even affects my hearing. Now I try to drink a lot of water each day. I'm not saying that is what happened to you but I notice it with me..........
I'll speak for hydration too - I find it really affects my ability to think clearly, which in turn affects so many elements of playing. And not just playing, but anything requiring mental acuity and focus. Keep that brain wet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
I play jazz most often with an 84 y.o. guitar player, sometimes we have a bass player and sometimes not. The guitar player is moody, and the gig goes well when he's in a good mood. If he's not, he's just kind of grumpy and nothing can go well. Sometimes he doesn't like what we're wearing (not fancy enough- he's old school and wants to look "classy" which basically means to wear black), or he gets irritated at some people who are drinking beer and being really loud (which happens often because one of the weekly gigs is at a PUB!)- stupid stuff like that. It puts a damper on things and makes it hard to relax and play well.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top