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I've got a link 7 with very thin tip and rails. I"m not 100% sure how to judge a facing but this one feels steep.

Any tips on reeds and how adjusting reeds differs with this type of mouthpiece. I feel you have to be super careful on how you place the reed on this thing.

When I line it up its great but it's kind of a pain.
 

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You say it plays great when you line up the reed properly, but it’s a pain.

So why would you ever set up the reed any different than when its set to plays its best?
It takes a few seconds to make sure it is set up right.

I’ve never looked at lining up a reed as a pain. It’s simply a necessity to get the best sound you can get. I line up the reed the same way on every single mouthpiece regardless of the thickness of the side rails or tip rail. I make sure the tip of the reed is up to the tip of the mouthpiece and make sure that the reed is centered on the table.


I think you answered your own question. You found a way to set it up where the mouthpiece plays great, so that’s where it should be set up every time.
 

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Adjusting reeds will not differ. One tip - put the mouthpiece on the neck before putting on the reed; on some Links (I'm assuming a metal one...) the ligature will not stay in place when putting the mouthpiece on the cork. So put the mouthpiece on first... then the reed. When I adjust reeds (I know Mark likes synthetics so he doesn't have to do this part) I mostly use the side to side play test, and you can do that most easily with just the mouthpiece and neck.

EDIT: BTW, thin tip rails are great, the tone is clearer than with a tip rail that is too thick. As far as adjusting the reed position goes, Mark's comments are on the money.

(Of course this all assumes you know where the mouthpiece goes on the cork. I put a little pencil line on my cork, and always put my mouthpiece there. That's where it plays in tune... OK, tongue removed from cheek now :) )
 

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There is a parallel thread to your question here: https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...ess-and-form-influence-the-sound-and-response

See Sebastian's response:

I don't think it matters in terms of sound. I almost wish we would stop talking about mouthpieces in terms of sound in general. What we are talking about is how we sound on a given setup. It's better to talk in terms of performance in my experience.

Thinner tip rails will give the impression of the reed speaking a little better and articulation may feel more precise. Thin side rails have an even less noticeable effect when compared with baffle shapes, floor/roof height, squeeze or no squeeze at the throat and then how it expands into the chamber. Bergonzi is known to say "thin rails, thin sound" and some folks subscribe to that. You notice that more with Doc Tenney acolytes and fans who want as neutral as possible.

When you start thinning the tip rail and reshaping the baffle you start to notice that the mouthpiece performs more instantly and speaks clearer. The more defined the work almost feels like it's easier to define your sound. This all depends of course on how you voice the instrument and your background as a saxophonist.

When rails are rounded that can really begin to negatively affect the performance of the mouthpiece depending on how extreme it is. The effect is not unlike toneholes that aren't level or at least when pads aren't making good contact with the tone hole, likewise, your reed is making poor contact with the facing. Considering the thing that makes the actual sound is the reed, it's pretty significant.
 
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