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I'm sorry, where are you planning to apply this? Are you talking about the neck cork?

First of all Music Medic sells sheet cork in a wide variety of thicknesses, and I am sure Ferees does too.

Secondly, when I have had a ton of neck cork to take off, I go after it with a razor blade or Xacto knife and use the sanding for the last bit to refine it.
 

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If 1/16" cork which is the standard size for neck corks is too thick, the next size smaller is 3/64" which is often used on clarinet tenon joints. I wouldn't recommend going with anything thinner than that for a neck cork unless you have a very unusual soprano or mouthpiece or both. If you have a caliper you can measure the diameter of the tenon at the end and the interior diameter of the mouthpiece shank. Subtract the two figures and then divide that by 2. That will give approximately the thickness required. Add a small amount to that measurement to allow for a bit of compressing and you have the thickness of cork to start with. Remember that as you move back from the end of the neck it requires a bit more sanding to compensate for the slight taper. Ideally the finished cork needs to be cylindrical, and fit so the mouthpiece can comfortably go all the way to the end with a bit of twisting and pushing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If 1/16" cork which is the standard size for neck corks is too thick, the next size smaller is 3/64" which is often used on clarinet tenon joints. I wouldn't recommend going with anything thinner than that for a neck cork unless you have a very unusual soprano or mouthpiece or both. If you have a caliper you can measure the diameter of the tenon at the end and the interior diameter of the mouthpiece shank. Subtract the two figures and then divide that by 2. That will give approximately the thickness required. Add a small amount to that measurement to allow for a bit of compressing and you have the thickness of cork to start with. Remember that as you move back from the end of the neck it requires a bit more sanding to compensate for the slight taper. Ideally the finished cork needs to be cylindrical, and fit so the mouthpiece can comfortably go all the way to the end with a bit of twisting and pushing.
Both my curved and straight have very thin corks which makes me think they will need more frequent replacing, this the ask. Looks like music clinic goes quite thin in their assortment. Mouthpiece fits well on both.
 

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I wouldn't assume that a thin cork will last less than a thick one. They don't fail by wear, they fail either by compressing to the point that the MP is always loose, or they crack and start coming off. Set the thickness so you just use moderate force to put the MP on, use some cork grease the first few times, and you should be good for years. My three main saxes I've owned since 1978, 1984, and 1998, and I think I MIGHT have replaced neck corks four or five times in all that time (can't remember what horns or when). So if we say the alto three times and the bari three times (these get the most play) in the total of 74 years I've owned them, that averages out to about 9 years on a neck cork. Not a big thing to worry about. Plus, any semi-decent repair person can replace it and give it back to you the next day for under $20.
 

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Fit it right and use cork grease every time. I use Chinese sopranos and they all need to have the cork sanded to get a regular mouthpiece on. If you decide to sand a neck cork, set yourself up with a piece of wood dowel in a vise or affixed in some other way so you can put the neck on it and push with your belly to hold it still. Use masking tape to protect the finish behind the cork from the sandpaper. Cut 1/2" strips of sandpaper and use the 'shoeshine' stroke - turn the neck 90 degrees and use the same amount of strokes - repeat all the way around. Use cork grease and try the fit - if more sanding is needed, Wipe the cork grease off with a rag damp with alcohol before sanding.
 
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