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Forum Contributor 2008/Distinguished SOTW Member
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Woody enjoyed more success than you may realize. He was signed to a major label (Columbia), his album and song were Grammy nominations (Rosewood) and he recorded 3 records with Freddie Hubbard.

Many trumpet player friends were much bigger fans of Woody or equally to Freddie.

All in all. Woody Shaws recording are a testament to where jazz was going. His writing and playing are still fresh and inspiring today.

His comparative "lack" of success probably had to do more with his time in France (he was there for some time while Freddie was cutting records stateside). And after the tragic loss of Carter Jefferson his own touring band continued but seemed to lose some of it's momentum (they all still played in top form as one would expect). And of course he had his own demons to contend with.

Freddie's own reputation did not really start to suffer (to my knowledge) until around the time that Woddy died... makes you wonder. THey were close friends and I think it was harder on Freddie than maybe some people thought.

Either way, both have strong legacies. I like Woody's playing and writing a little more but I could listen to both ALL DAY LONG!
 

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Forum Contributor 2008/Distinguished SOTW Member
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3,295 Posts
Woody's thing was firmly rooted in the pentatonics and in using fourth stack intervals. I remember studying with Frank Tiberi and he had me using diatonic fourth stacks like using diatonic thirds. I remember thinking that it sounded a lot like Woody when working on it. ;) Except not nearly as awesome of course.b Utilizing Diatonic fourth stacks creates a pentatonic scale that is offset from the major scale.

They would be (in C).

D-G-C
E-A-D
G-C-F
A-D-G
B-E-A

This creates a very motion oriented sound. And open.
 
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