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Discussion Starter #1
Got out my 1969 MK VI tenor(low miles) for a gig yesterday. I noticed immediately when I fingered the lower stack keys a clicking. When I tried to blow the lower stack was stuffy. I did break out my
screwdriver and adjusted a little. The screw immediately on top of the G# key needed screwing down a bit(a 1/4 turn, which is a lot). I was trying to screw the other screw that connects to the bis key Bb
pad. Someone put some thread locker or something on it.
Questions: 1. Anyone have these issues? 2. Anyone have some nifty tricks?
Thanks in advance. I know there is tremendous knowledge within this Selmer Sax forum. Ernie in Louisville
 

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Got out my 1969 MK VI tenor(low miles) for a gig yesterday. I noticed immediately when I fingered the lower stack keys a clicking. When I tried to blow the lower stack was stuffy. I did break out my
screwdriver and adjusted a little. The screw immediately on top of the G# key needed screwing down a bit(a 1/4 turn, which is a lot). I was trying to screw the other screw that connects to the bis key Bb
pad. Someone put some thread locker or something on it.
Questions: 1. Anyone have these issues? 2. Anyone have some nifty tricks?
Thanks in advance. I know there is tremendous knowledge within this Selmer Sax forum. Ernie in Louisville
Probably the thin cork on the end of the screw has fallen off.

Personally, if the adjusting screw does not have sliding motion with respect tp what it bears on, I prefer to put the thin cork, leather, or equiv. on the thing it bears on (I think in your case this would be the top of the pad cup). Then the installation doesn't have to be so precise, there's a lot more glue area, and you don't have to trim the cork (or equiv.) into a neat circle. If the screw has sliding motion it's probably better to have the cork (or equiv.) on the end of the screw.

I just use nail polish, clear, for adjusting screws where I want a weak threadlocking.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Probably the thin cork on the end of the screw has fallen off.

Personally, if the adjusting screw does not have sliding motion with respect tp what it bears on, I prefer to put the thin cork, leather, or equiv. on the thing it bears on (I think in your case this would be the top of the pad cup). Then the installation doesn't have to be so precise, there's a lot more glue area, and you don't have to trim the cork (or equiv.) into a neat circle. If the screw has sliding motion it's probably better to have the cork (or equiv.) on the end of the screw.

I just use nail polish, clear, for adjusting screws where I want a weak threadlocking.
Excellent ideas. Have another gig today. I just adjusted it and its tight now but 'clicky" I'll try to put thin cork
on the end of the screw when I have more time. I HATE clicky action!!!
 

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Some adjusting screws have a flat end and others have a "recess" for some type of plug. For those with a "recess" I use a small Tandy leather punch to punch a plug out of the correct thickness of either regular cork or tech cork. That is attached to the adjusting screw using gap filling super glue. You can do the same on a screw with a flat end, but there is less chance of it being stable for a long period of time. Another easier DIY material can be found by going to the hardware store and picking up several sizes of small rubber O-rings. Find the correct diameter that fits snugly, and cut off a small length. Glue this in place the same as the cork or tech cork. If you want to be really OCD you can spin the adjusting screw chucked into an electric drill and "dome" the end of the material using an emery board. This makes it easier to get a precise adjustment. All adjustments of these screws are best done using a leak light.
 

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You'll see on the MK VI that there is a recess on the point of the adjusters as mentioned. Use this to glue a piece of cork in it. The best thing to use is the small-diameter cork 'rod' that is made for this purpose or you can just make a little round piece - doesn't have to be perfect. Exposed thickness should only be about 1mm. I do not support in any way at any time for any reason attaching cork or any other material to the sax body or keys (except for the lower stack bounce-stops as per factory). Every cork or felt has its place and the pad cup is not that place. Anyway, you'll have to work on the stuck screw but you have to be very carful you don't bend anything, damage the screw slots or anything else. If you think the lower screw is glued, you might have to use heat but don't burn the lacquer or anything else. Another way is to use the solvent for the glue but without knowing for sure, you'll have to use Acetone. Protect the lacquer under and around the screw and put tiny drops of Acetone around the exposed threads either at the top or bottom. Frequently try to turn it with the screwdriver during this because otherwise the Acetone will evaporate and the glue will re-set. Once it starts to turn, keep treating and turning until it backs out. Its also possible somebody disrupted the threads to keep it from turning - hopefully this didn't happen. You can use a tiny amount of clear RTV silicone rubber sealant on the threads to secure the screws - and it will cure over the hours after you get your adjustments. This doesn't 'lock' the threads and you can easily remove the screw but it keeps it from turning on its own.
 

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You'll see on the MK VI that there is a recess on the point of the adjusters as mentioned. Use this to glue a piece of cork in it. The best thing to use is the small-diameter cork 'rod' that is made for this purpose or you can just make a little round piece - doesn't have to be perfect. Exposed thickness should only be about 1mm. I do not support in any way at any time for any reason attaching cork or any other material to the sax body or keys (except for the lower stack bounce-stops as per factory). Every cork or felt has its place and the pad cup is not that place. Anyway, you'll have to work on the stuck screw but you have to be very carful you don't bend anything, damage the screw slots or anything else. If you think the lower screw is glued, you might have to use heat but don't burn the lacquer or anything else. Another way is to use the solvent for the glue but without knowing for sure, you'll have to use Acetone. Protect the lacquer under and around the screw and put tiny drops of Acetone around the exposed threads either at the top or bottom. Frequently try to turn it with the screwdriver during this because otherwise the Acetone will evaporate and the glue will re-set. Once it starts to turn, keep treating and turning until it backs out. Its also possible somebody disrupted the threads to keep it from turning - hopefully this didn't happen. You can use a tiny amount of clear RTV silicone rubber sealant on the threads to secure the screws - and it will cure over the hours after you get your adjustments. This doesn't 'lock' the threads and you can easily remove the screw but it keeps it from turning on its own.
1) Well, if the screw has a recess then that is the only place to put the cork (or equiv.), as if you put it on the other part it will quickly be crushed down by the rim around the recess.

2) A small soldering iron may well give enough heat to soften something used as a threadlocker without damaging the lacquer, and you have good control over where the heat is applied (unlike a torch or heat gun). I would probably use solvent first if the lacquer's gone at that area (acetone will take it off), and try heat first if the lacquer is good.

3) For the apparently locked screw, make absolutely sure you have a screwdriver that fits the slot EXACTLY.

4) As far as deviating from where the factory applied bumpers felts etc., I have sufficient confidence in my engineering skills after 35 years of designing, building, and bringing to mass production various types of precision machinery. If I think doing something a different way would be better, I go ahead and try it. I have found that there are a lot of hinky mechanical things done on saxophones. One of them is that the placement of corks between elements that slide on each other is sometimes not optimal. I suspect that efficiency in assembly often overrides optimum mechanical design. The guys who designed the mechanisms of a particular sax were just guys like me, not superhumans.
 

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Regarding inserts for the tips of adjusting screws that have a sliding action with the mating part: How ‘bout an insert made of UHMWPE or Delrin?

Neither will compress as easily as cork, and should hold adjustment much better. Both also have better sliding action.
 

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Regarding inserts for the tips of adjusting screws that have a sliding action with the mating part: How ‘bout an insert made of UHMWPE or Delrin?

Neither will compress as easily as cork, and should hold adjustment much better. Both also have better sliding action.
Problem is that such materials are also a lot harder and thus potentially cause noise.
 

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Regarding inserts for the tips of adjusting screws that have a sliding action with the mating part: How ‘bout an insert made of UHMWPE or Delrin?

Neither will compress as easily as cork, and should hold adjustment much better. Both also have better sliding action.
I think I’ve seen plastic or nylon used without any clicking. The clicking is probably metal on metal.
If you start putting cork on the G# key, you’re heading down the slippery slope.
It’s probably just gunked up. I’ve used a penetrating oil called Kroil that with loosen anything, even the adjustable screws for the bumpers on the keyguards.
 

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Regarding inserts for the tips of adjusting screws that have a sliding action with the mating part: How ‘bout an insert made of UHMWPE or Delrin?

Neither will compress as easily as cork, and should hold adjustment much better. Both also have better sliding action.
As turf pointed out a material like Delrin can make a sound when the G# key or Bis key lever comes up and contacts the adjustment screw. At these locations, including the low B to C# closing arm friction is not a significant issue that affects the efficiency of the mechanical transfer. What a bit of friction can do however, is to accelerate the wearing of the buffering/quieting material causing the mechanism to go out of regulation. My choice du jour is to use a domed plug of tech cork to which I have applied a coating of paraffin wax. It seems to work better than anything else I have tried to date.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You guys are so knowledgeable! I did put some key oil on the stuck screw and it released after a few minutes. I did make sure I had the correct sized screw driver bit. I think I will take the G# screw out tomorrow and try to use one of the techniques suggested. I did play it today but I hate noisy keys! Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Tonight I removed the G# screw. Sure enough, it was worn down to metal. I cut a cork with my leather punch(thanks for that great tip). Used gorilla glue and wetted the metal and took a needle and placed the cork into the hole in the screw. Tomorrow I’ll screw it in and sand it plat and adjust. Hopefully a tight adjustment and no CLICK! Thanks for the advice.
 

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Sanding the cork to a dome in a drill chuck as mentioned above is good advice, a flat end that doesn't sit perfectly square with the mating surface as the screw turns makes adjustment trickier. The dome gives a single point of contact. Just be careful not to damage the threads if placing in a chuck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I managed to adjust the forked Bb and the G# articulated key. Plays like a dream! Also put clear nail polish to help secure them and also put a cork on my high Eb key that was clicky. So nice to play a horn that is smooth and makes no noise. I played a Super 20 for 25 years then a Buffet S1 for 30. The Selmer thing is new to me. My left thumb couldnt handle the movement the S1 required and the MK VI requires little left thumb movement.
For helping I am going to buy you all a drink.. “Bartender, I’ll have a large Coke and 2000 straws!
 

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My first project as an apprentice in a repair shop was to make a "pig sticker" as my boss called it. I still have it after 17 years. You can make them using needle springs or even a regular needle. A thin needle is great for holding corks, felts, etc. prior to gluing and a thicker needle works great for scraping excess solder and cleaning the inside corner of key cups. The photo below shows why God made drum sticks. :bluewink:

View attachment 214768
 

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Putting a "dome" on a felt bumper would not be to any advantage because of the flexibility of the felt and the wider contact surface. Besides, the openings of bell keys, low C, and Eb do not need to be "exact" compared to other specs on a saxophone. However, if that is really what you want to do. :)

To answer your question I would find a short brass tube that the felt bumper fits snugly into and insert the bumper into the tube so that only about 1/8" is left protruding. Then I would spin the tube in a bench motor and using an "emery board" put very light pressure against the corner of the felt bumper to sand off some of the material.
 

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Thanks for the answer. On my sax those bumpers are at an angle matching the key cup, possibly from taking a "set" and when I turn them to adjust I get a large variation in adjustment up and down as they turn, so in my case it would be helpful to at least level them out. Didn't know you could sand felt.
 
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