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Re: The Saxophone’s Unlikely Journey Out of Meme Hell…

This is not even worth being called fake news. And that's not even saying very little.
 

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Re: The Saxophone’s Unlikely Journey Out of Meme Hell…

Ive actually heard of the saxophonist mentioned in this writing. I honestly think the writer is very biased in a lot of what he said. The fact that he placed David Sanborn in the smooth jazz category, shows his ignorance for one. While Sanborn was known to some as a smooth jazz artist, he's accomplished probably more then any of the newer musicians ever will in their lifetime. Sure saxophone lost a lot of its popularity after the 80's (as we all know almost every top ten hit had a saxophone solo in it back in those days), there is still a great interest in the saxophone. Look at a lot of the up and comers of today. I am starting to notice more horn based bands though in popular music. While I can respect what the artists are doing and even like some of it, at least it is an instrument that is still being played and heard today and in today's music, and it is a real instrument and not something that is programmed which is a lot more then I can say for some of the stuff circulating out there and what is popular now.

I don't think that the writer of the article dug deep enough to find all that David Sanborn did accomplish in the music industry. All of the recordings that he had done with all of the other groups. Many of which todays artists are trying to emulate. Pop music in the 80's did put saxophone on the map, even though many may not have liked it or appreciated it, it seems as if it was always there.

I will rephrase what I had mentioned about music in the 80's. While it didn't put saxophone on the map, it maintained and helped preserve the sound and presence of the saxophone in popular music
 

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Re: The Saxophone’s Unlikely Journey Out of Meme Hell…

Funny enough, reading this made me think of Pixar's Ratatouille.
Quite often critics like to pass for literate, knowledgeable and of absolute good taste and judgement.
In the suggested article, one can find many of the classic artifices usually used to indirectly make these statements (confusion between exhaustiveness and the use of diverse and overabundant examples, definitive and radical statements, ...)

As for the artist who is abundantly advertised here, I listened to the first sample provided in the article... to my greatest bewilderment !
All I heard was a lot of screaming which made me wonder if the sax itself wasn't trying to call for help in a desperate attempt to fight for its survival against said 'artist'...
If _that_ is the future of saxophone playing, please consider that the name of my instrument is the triangle !

The point of all my 'verbiage' (excuse my french... I meant 'trash talk') is that anyone can write a harsh review... it doesn't make it true, nor right.
 

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Re: The Saxophone�s Unlikely Journey Out of Meme Hell�

I liked reading the article, not that I agreed with all of it. Certainly the author went out of his way to make it as challenging and offensive as he could to garner some friction and hence readership (clicks?) on it. The part about jazz getting too anchored in transcribing Charlie Parker and the numbing demagoguery of jazz (ii-V-I patterns in all 12 keys anyone?) resonates with me. Probably because I am too dense to understand them and hence enjoy them, but still that whole line of thought leaves me cold. So far.

I missed seeing Kamasi Washington here in Cincy not too long ago, but based on the clip in the article of his I'm going to give him some more ear. I really enjoyed it.
 

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Re: The Saxophone’s Unlikely Journey Out of Meme Hell…

I will rephrase what I had mentioned about music in the 80's. While it didn't put saxophone on the map, it maintained and helped preserve the sound and presence of the saxophone in popular music
I agree with that statement and with your defence of David Sanborn. He had an original style and sound that inspired many of the smooth jazzers, but he was much more than that as an artist.

These things go in cycles. The author may not know that in the 1950s, the majority of the solos in pop records featured the sax. In the later 1960s and 1970s, it was guitar solos. By the early 80s, punk and new wave bands were rebelling against the guitar solo by having no solos at all. By the mid 80s it was sax again all over the radio as the listeners were tired of guitar. But from the 1920s to now, the sax has never really gone away. Perhaps there aren't so many solos, but there are always horn sections in bands (R&B, funk, ska, etc) and every pop singer who decides to make a album of "standards" uses sax and saxophone sections.
 

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I've been trying to put my finger on what really bugged me about this article, aside from the obvious ignorance of and insulting statements by the author. Then it dawned on me. There seems to be a tendency to only value that which is currently popular, the lowest common denominator, so to speak. To take such a view is to dismiss and miss out on so much of the timeless beauty of true artistic endeavor throughout the ages. The one real art form that arose in the U.S., created largely out of the black experience and expanded from there, is jazz. If you missed it, or can't hear it, I feel sorry for you. Life is short and there's so much to experience and discover. Don't worry about what is popular or what idiots like the author of this article have to say. Pay attention to the truth and that which has real and lasting value.

Ok, rant over.
 

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I've been trying to put my finger on what really bugged me about this article, aside from the obvious ignorance of and insulting statements by the author. Then it dawned on me. There seems to be a tendency to only value that which is currently popular, the lowest common denominator, so to speak. To take such a view is to dismiss and miss out on so much of the timeless beauty of true artistic endeavor throughout the ages. The one real art form that arose in the U.S., created largely out of the black experience and expanded from there, is jazz. If you missed it, or can't hear it, I feel sorry for you. Life is short and there's so much to experience and discover. Don't worry about what is popular or what idiots like the author of this article have to say. Pay attention to the truth and that which has real and lasting value.

Ok, rant over.
1+
 

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Ah, he's just a punk. At least he mentioned Donny McCaslin and Melissa Aldana, so some good could come of it.
 

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Ah, he's just a punk. At least he mentioned Donny McCaslin and Melissa Aldana, so some good could come of it.
yeah, a bit of a punk. My main issue is that he’s focusing on certain hipster ethic but ignoring all sorts of other music and media.
 
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