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Discussion Starter #1
I have bought a Runyon Custom and I love it for my soprano. The MPC that is. The Lig is not that great, for me. I am using a Vandoren #2 reed on a #7 MPC. It sounds great but still have to "strain" abit. Well my chops hurt and my head, so I tried something. I used the expensive rubber band. I played it and it sounded great. In tune and everything. Now, is there a lig that is close to the rubber band? I like a bright sound and this setup works. I thought about a Rovner Light for metal. Small MPC. I thought that they had sent one for a sopranino!! I think a normal lig wont fit. Anywho any thought would be great.

Thanks,
Joshua
 

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I find it's difficult to get hard core about a rubber band.


Sorry, I didn't think you meant as a ligature.:)

Whatever holds a reed steady, string, metal whatever...
 

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search: broccolig:)
 

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I once lost my lig on tour (really long story which involves a lot of drinking in a small town in Ukraine). For some reason I had a hair tie thing that my then girlfriend uses to pull her hair back. Anyway, I used it for the rest of the tour with no incident. I did find that my reed would get out of position from time to time.
 

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I'm 100% happy with the Vandoren string ligature on tenor sax and clarinet. However, Vandoren doesn't make the lig for bass clarinet. Inspired by this thread, I tried several kinds of rubber bands on bass clarinet. We had lots of thick ones in our junk drawer. I tried them first and it seemed to me that my sound was kind of muffled. Then I found a couple of thin rubber bands and my sound was better with them. However, I found that I'm much happier with my sound using a Vandoren Masters lig. Also, I felt worried about my reed as I was wrapping the rubber bands around the mouthpiece. I'm sticking to the Masters.

PS, This exercise was helpful to see that if I ever found myself in an emergency situation at a gig with a broken ligature a pair of rubber bands can work.

Roger
 

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BlackFrancis,
Here's how it goes: The purple would sound mystical and enticing, the green would sound energetic and carefree and the brown would sound mundane and drab. We won't ruminate over how the red would sound!
Candy
 

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Discussion Starter #13
As with Roger, I was inspired to make my own lig seeing how the rubber band worked and gave my the sound I was looking aswell. I tell you what, this sax playing is fun and you can be creative and come up with all kinds of cool and fun stuff.

The red rubber band. I still cant talk about it. My therapist said that the nightmares and voices would subside soon. My dog is fine and is getting better. Poor guy still cant walk straight.

Joshua
 

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Rovner 1 RXS is the right size for Runyon Custom for soprano sax.
BTW, I have used O-rings for several mouthpieces which were too slim for my available ligatures. As Chicken 'Lil says, only problem is that the reed dislocates easily. In that case, use two O-rings.
 

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the bois ligature....... is essentially a O ring with a nice cap to go with it!
 

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O-Rings, a Plumber's and Saxophonist's best friend

I'm a fairly inventive second-time around late-blooming more-than-rank-beginner willing to try just about anything if it works, is cheap and is easy to get, so I have been using O-rings as a lig for over a month now for my daily practice sessions, while waiting for my long overdue backordered Rovner light. I tried a velcro cable-tie and rubber bands first but the O-rings are much higher tech and win hands down. I think the sound is better than that of the standard 2 screw metal lig and especailly the one that came with my Kessler alto, given that it came deformed so wouldn't seat the reed correctly and I had to constantly screw with it (literally) which got to be a big waste of practice time. My mpc is the Kessler copy of a Selmer C* (so they claim) that came with the horn, and I use either 3 or even 4 rings depending on how well the reed seals to the piece, plays and sounds. The big decider is how many seconds of suction I get before the pop (I do this with the mpc on the neck). Generally it is about 3 or 4 seconds.

The trick to using O-rings is to wet them slightly with some drops of water on your finger from a glass which allows you to slide, not roll, them down the mpc one by one while holding the reed in place with the other hand. After the first one is on you can still adjust the position of the reed relative to the tip but after that it is impossible to move it. If you don't wet them they roll and then you can't position them where you want to and the bottom one always ends up rolling right off the back of the piece onto the barrel . When I have problems with a reed, I move them up or down the mpc to find the best location to improve the reed's response.

While they do work well, I can't say that O-rings are totally convenient to use because to adjust the reed's position later on or to change reeds you have to roll them all off and do the whole thing over again. I am pretty fast at it now but it still can't compare to just sliding a reed on under the lig and tighting the screw(s). However they do produce a fairly warm tone and good projection and while the sound is not overly bright it certainly isn't muffled. The diameter and thickness of the rings surely enter into the results so I spent a good long time at the hardware store fitting various ones on for size before settling on the ones I use. Ask me if you are interested and I'll post the particulars.
 
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