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Beaufort, Frank Holton, Austria

Here is another of those Austrian Beauforts that defy classification, this time with great pictures. I think it's a Bb tenor, with a a bell that is unusually flared away from the body. The seller says it's pre Elkhorn, pre Spring of 1918:
http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-POS-ANT...ultDomain_0?hash=item5ad62735ce#ht_4914wt_941

Now, if I had just kept my mouth shut, I could have been the only bidder!
 

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Re: Beaufort, Frank Holton, Austria

The buyer should be prepared that apparently there is an unusual part of the low D key-mechanism (trill-key?) missing.
Possibly stuck rods.
Yes, it looks like they removed the trill key touch, the keycup and pad, and soldered the hole closed. It must have been an Eb trill, being in the middle of the D key, venting a half step higher. Based upon photos of other similar Beauforts, I think the two or three other little trill keys down there have been decomissioned. I would expect to find the levers chopped off and the moving pivot parts soldered together. I am suspicious of the left side. Out of 19 fotos, there's no view of the LH. The low C key guard is missing, and the solder traces remain. This horn could be a piece of work---POW, not POS.

After examining some pictures of the early Evette-Schaeffer shown here: http://www.saxpics.com/?v=gal&a=1219
I have to wonder why nearly every design feature is identical to the Beaufort sold by Holton. There has gotta be some connection. Other than the bell engraving, I can find no difference.
 

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I just noticed the rather primitive LH pinky keys on the beat up Beaufort alto: there seems to be a couple of missing keys, by design, probably for the low B and C or C#, and it appears that the 2 RH lower "trill" type keys are meant to take their place. Maybe it worked really well, since the levers are very short and close to the keys. I imagine it is probably more clarinet-like, to be able to actuate those low notes with alternating left and right hands. God knows the downfall of the saxophone is having to handle those hard-action, sluggish, long levered low notes with your left pinky. Try playing fast chromatic runs, up and down 10 times, from low Bb to C.

What I wonder is, how could you actuate those low RH trill keys when your Rt hand is already expected to hold a low D?
 

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Two Holton/Beaufort/Evette/Buffet Crampon tenors have surfaced: One looks to me like a previous eBay sale that the new seller has fixed up, including replacing the missing low C guard and a repad. I believe this one had it's RH levers cut off, but I'm not sure:
[http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...499169&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT#ht_500wt_1182

The second one is F/S on SOTW right now, from Normandy, France, at 250 Euros (approx. 339 USD). http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?131757-Old-Buffet-Crampon-Tenor-for-Sale-(Apogee)
The seller says Apogee, but I can't see any extra keys or levers. This is stamped Buffet Crampon, France, not Austria like the others. I wonder if there was a factory in Austria that made these horns, or if the French parts were just assembled there. Those hand engraved "Austria l.p" scripts on the back look like an afterthought.
 

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There must be many European stencils, just like there were in the USA. It looks like Holton bought them for a few years, until getting their factory started in Elkhorn, Wisconsin to make their own full line of saxes.
 

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So proud, I am, to be called a Holton Freak. That Rampone Bari is beautiful, and the picture of the double pad low D key makes it clear how it works. Does the small pad open give you an Eb?
 
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