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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This being my first post here, I hope this is the correct way of doing it—

I took my sax apart to polish it, the same way I always do, but now I’m having a problem. The last screw I tried to screw in is getting tight when it’s only half of the way in. I’ve tried different angles and different screws, nothing seems to work. Any help is greatly appreciated!

I doubt it would matter much, but it’s a silver Super Action 80 series 1 bari.
 

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Are you sure it's the correct screw?
Is there any possibility that you may have crossthreaded it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It’s definitely one of 2 screws. I tried both.
And please excuse my lack of knowledge but what exactly is crossthreading?
 

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It's when the screw/bolt is started in the hole wrong and the threads or grooves get messed up. With horns it's usually the threads inside the hole that get messed up. The screw cuts across the threads of the hole at an angle causing binding or no screwing in entirely depending on the extent of the damage.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015-2017
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Yep. A familiar problem. The steel screw material is harder than the brass post, so the screw typically cuts crooked new threads into the post. Usually easy to fix by starting over and getting the screw in straight.

It helps if you havent been to enthusiastic with the crooked threading.


On the other hand, your fine Selmer is now imperfect. There is good news!
I am willing to give it a good home here is sunny SoCal.

As a public service you know.

Welcome.
Dat
Sax
Man
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well it was already far from perfect. Thanks for the help, I’ll be extra careful and try again in a little bit.
 

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Yeah, sometimes inhave removed the key entirely and threaded the screw in fro the other side to clean up the threads a bit. Varying degrees of success.
 

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Sometimes it helps to put the screw in the post and slowly turn it backwards until you hear or feel a click which indicates the thread has fallen into the right track. All the other advice in this thread is spot on as well. Depending on how badly the threads inside the post are messed up, you may end up having to take it to a tech to run the appropriate size tap through the post to cut new threads. This is a hard way to learn that "haste makes waste" when working on saxophones---a lesson I have learned many times over the years. :)
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
saxophone, flutes and lil' bit of clarinet
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You probably should not be taking your sax apart to polish it anyway. If you really must, get a paint brush and some Q-tips and clean it without taking it apart.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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btw, a clean paint brush. Not one that has ever been used for painting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Usually i wouldn’t take it apart, but this one had some crazy bad tarnish on it that I just couldn’t get to. I think I’ll end up having to take this to the shop, it’s about time for a couple new pads anyway. Thanks for all the help everyone, now I know for next time.
 

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Sometimes it helps to put the screw in the post and slowly turn it backwards until you hear or feel a click which indicates the thread has fallen into the right track. All the other advice in this thread is spot on as well. Depending on how badly the threads inside the post are messed up, you may end up having to take it to a tech to run the appropriate size tap through the post to cut new threads. This is a hard way to learn that "haste makes waste" when working on saxophones---a lesson I have learned many times over the years. :)
I agree; that almost always works.
 
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