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Wes Montgomery. Great place to start is Full House with Johnny Griffin. I'm a guitarist, and I don't even listen to any other guitarists anymore. Why would I, my fave players are manily brass and piano? I think that sax players get bored listening to a guitarist's usual limitations and lack of dynamic expression. Not Wes, listening to him is as exciting and surprising as it gets, and he's the supreme master at keeping it going, the ultimate melodist with endless supply of the hippest lines. Rollins has said so, Coltrane wanted him in his band, Cannonball flipped when he first heard him and ran to a phone to demand that Orin Keepnews sign the guy, which he did. You ever feel like you're gonna burst from excitement listening to your fave players?

Any other Wes lovers out there?
 

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Wes was a lovely player. Others worthy of consideration include Bill Frisell, Jim Hall, Ed Bickert, John Abercrombie, Russell Malone, Jimmy Raney, Peter Bernstein, Jack Wilkins and Joe Cohn (son of Al). No limitations or lack of expression here...
 

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These guys don't suck one bit. Lage Lund, Kurt Rosenwinkel
 

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I to am a big fan of Wes... but there is no way he is the only guitarist one should listen to! Goodness I can't even beilieve the thought of that! What about Django, Stevie RV, Hendrix, BB King, Lang, Yngwie (like his playing not attitude), R Rhoads, Joe Pass.... My head is already dizzy thinking of all the great guitarists!

I will relay a story from a guitar teacher I had... Once while being a roady for Metallica, He (my former teacher) was watching Kirk Hammet solo with improvizations for the song "Battery." Someone dropped an extra microphone on the stage during setup (it was dark) and Kirk stepped on the mic, slipping and falling flat on his back in the middle of the solo. Not only did he not make a mistake or miss any note, it was one of the best variations of the solo my teacher had ever heard....

There are amazing musicians in every genre...
 

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I can't remember what documentary it was, but I do remember him saying that he himself wasn't much for playing single note lines.
 

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If you hear BB now you might not think he's a great player, after all, everybody who plays blues plays like that. Thing is, he invented it, the style that everybody now plays, at least I think he did. I can remember hearing Sweet Little Angel on the AM way back, and being blown away.
Saying BB invented that style is a lot like saying Columbus discovered America. Widely believed, and largely false. I have a lot of respect for the man. He is the ultimate showman. He would be the first to admit that there were a lot of unsung greats that came before him.

Now as far as Guitar players go, my choice would be Larry Carleton.
 

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Carlton, Ritenour, and Stryker are the contemporary jazz guitarists for me.
 

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Wes was a lovely player. Others worthy of consideration include Bill Frisell, Jim Hall, Ed Bickert, Russell Malone, Jimmy Raney, Peter Bernstein, Jack Wilkins and Joe Cohn (son of Al). No limitations or lack of expression here...
yes by all means props to Wes, but how nice to see Ed Bickert get a mention. If you are not familiar with his playing please check him out.
 

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and I don't even listen to any other guitarists anymore. Why would I?
I'll try to answer that question... because otherwise you are limiting your intake of playing styles to a very specific style thereby limiting your own ability to play with your own sound... not Wes's sound. I didn't hear Wes ever playing any squeal harmonics or sweep-picking arpeggios...

Don't get me wrong I believe he was a great player with innovative and soulful musical ideas... but guitar playing has advanced since he passed IMO
 

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As a guitarist myself, I can list dozens of six stringers that sax players could get much from by listening to. But lists are not any good if you don't what you should be listening for. For example, when George Benson plays and sings his solos at the same time. It shows he's thinking, hearing and playing what's in his head and not just doodling through scale patterns on the fretboard. When Eric Clapton bends the strings, he does so with slowly rising climax (I guess that why he's called slow hand). Chet Atkin's constant use of counterpoint in almost everything he did. Even Frank Zappa's freakish phasing is inspiring. Wes Montgomery was about playing smooth and clean with perfect feel.
 

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I love Wes Montgomery! Just started getting into him. Full House is a great record. Have been too mired in only listening to sax-heavy albums.. so I'm gonna check out some of the other names listed in this thread (I do love Bill Frisell too). I don't think there's any such thing as "the only (whatever instrument) that whoever should listen to". too limiting!
 

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Wes Montgomery....

Any other Wes lovers out there?
Oh yes ! One of my favorite tunes: Sun Down, from his California Dreaming album. A plain blues in A at a relaxed splanky tempo. In 5 choruses, he tells the whole story (with no less than Herbie Hancock comping).

Other favorite 6 stringers: Kenny Burrell, Larry Carlton & George Benson.
 

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I don't listen to Mozart, why would I when there is no sax in it :)

Coltrane listened to loads of things that didn't have a sax in them.

Brecker was trying to do quarter tones from listening to blues/rock guitarists doing them.

Allan Holdsworth has a guitar style based on a lot of sax like phrasing.

Charlie Christian was there at the start of Bebop and I don't think the sax players were telling him to stop playing because he was a guitarist.

Nothing wrong with having big ears for ideas, no matter where it comes from.
 
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