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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe I am old school but I find the old reed guards the best (even the old aluminum ones from years back.) They are flat and DO NOT have the grooves in them like some of the new guards and cases have. To me , the new stuff with the grooves wrinkles and warps the tips of the reeds. I have used the old guards for years and never have a problem with warpage. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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Maybe I am old school but I find the old reed guards the best (even the old aluminum ones from years back.) They are flat and DO NOT have the grooves in them like some of the new guards and cases have. To me , the new stuff with the grooves wrinkles and warps the tips of the reeds. I have used the old guards for years and never have a problem with warpage. Just my 2 cents.
I agree.

For keeping reeds ready to play for multiple instruments over short intervals (i.e., 1/2 hour - 2 hours), I like to use the newer Rico guards with the hygro packs that hold 8 reeds, but I still use the original plastic LaVoz reed guards, and I certainly prefer them to any of the last few versions that they've put out.
 

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I liked ( and still have one or two) the La Voz. I now use the wood cases with glass faces. Flat is good. I don’t like science experience cases, and my reeds drying just don’t cause me trouble. A reed tool like the reed geek works to fix up a warped reed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree.

For keeping reeds ready to play for multiple instruments over short intervals (i.e., 1/2 hour - 2 hours), I like to use the newer Rico guards with the hygro packs that hold 8 reeds, but I still use the original plastic LaVoz reed guards, and I certainly prefer them to any of the last few versions that they've put out.
I guess the Rico guards are o k for the short term, but when I tried to use them for overnight storage or longer , because of the grooves, they tended to warp my reeds. For the longer periods , I prefer the old LaVoz guards that are flat and I never had warpage problems with them. When I finish with a reed, I rinse it off , smooth it out and put it in the LaVoz reedguard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I liked ( and still have one or two) the La Voz. I now use the wood cases with glass faces. Flat is good. I don't like science experience cases, and my reeds drying just don't cause me trouble. A reed tool like the reed geek works to fix up a warped reed.
Exactly, flat is good. My reeds drying don't cause me trouble either as long as they dry flat. The reed geek is great also to fix any problem reed
 

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I use both ( aluminum too) and I don’t have wrinkles if not occasionally. I suppose the idea of the grooves is to prevent adhesion and mold growth when drying , both things , I think I have observed over the years, more common on flat surfaces. For what is worth , I dried reeds for a while on some pieces of glass , the idea being that it would be flatter, I gave up doing it .
 

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I haven't found any real difference in performance between the aluminum ones with flat base and the plastic ones with grooved base.

The plastic ones will fatigue and the spring element break off, after some years of usage. On the other hand, the aluminum ones seem more prone to leaving a dent in the top of the reed.

The aluminum ones are just a bit too narrow to fit Vandoren baritone reeds (or they were, when I started using Vandoren bari reeds, maybe 35 years ago) and that was why I went to the plastic ones in the first place.

So I think it comes down to personal preference. Over all my saxophones I use both metal and plastic reed guards without really paying attention to which one is used, probably 3/4 are plastic just because of the dates of acquisition.
 

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The purpose of the grooves on the newer Reedguard is to help in removing the reed by reducing the surface area. They have no effect on warping. Proper use of the Reedguard is as follows; put the wet reed in after use. About a half hour before needing the reed, take it out, moisten it and put it back in. It will be flat and ready to play.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I haven't found any real difference in performance between the aluminum ones with flat base and the plastic ones with grooved base.

The plastic ones will fatigue and the spring element break off, after some years of usage. On the other hand, the aluminum ones seem more prone to leaving a dent in the top of the reed.

The aluminum ones are just a bit too narrow to fit Vandoren baritone reeds (or they were, when I started using Vandoren bari reeds, maybe 35 years ago) and that was why I went to the plastic ones in the first place.

So I think it comes down to personal preference. Over all my saxophones I use both metal and plastic reed guards without really paying attention to which one is used, probably 3/4 are plastic just because of the dates of acquisition.
I never had a problem with the plastic ones breaking and have used them for many years. If they are breaking , it is probably due to pushing the reeds in too hard. Same thing applies to the aluminum ones leaving a dent in the top, if you push the reeds in too far or too hard that will happen. I agree that it is a matter of personal preference, just like reeds are and everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The purpose of the grooves on the newer Reedguard is to help in removing the reed by reducing the surface area. They have no effect on warping. Proper use of the Reedguard is as follows; put the wet reed in after use. About a half hour before needing the reed, take it out, moisten it and put it back in. It will be flat and ready to play.
I never have a problem removing the reeds from the old reedguards, if they are a little stuck I just wiggle them side to side and they come right out and without any crinkles in them.It is a matter of personal preference. I still would rather dry them flat. This is all subjective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have the plastic ones and I have not had a problem with warping. Ive used them since I started playing. I have never felt the need to buy designer reed holders.
Phil, are yours the old plastic ones that are flat or the newer made ones with the grooves in them? I am thinking that yours are the older flat ones. I also don't care for the newer designer reed holders.
 

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I never had a problem with the plastic ones breaking and have used them for many years. If they are breaking , it is probably due to pushing the reeds in too hard. Same thing applies to the aluminum ones leaving a dent in the top, if you push the reeds in too far or too hard that will happen. I agree that it is a matter of personal preference, just like reeds are and everything else.
Agreed. But I had to have a couple break before I took a good look at the construction and realized that a "light shove" was all it could handle.
 

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I don't know about you, but I often find myself fiddling with reeds over an open sax case. I've goofed before and had a plastic Reedguard slip and land on the horn. No harm, no foul, but I doubt that would be the case using one of the aluminum ones I have. I've stopped using those.
 

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I think they stopped making the aluminum ones because they last too long. I'm still using the ones I bought 40 years ago. If you have a problem with reeds sticking at the tip, soak the guard in water and then clean the flat surface with a pipe cleaner or something like that. They get dirty from the reed combined with your saliva.
 

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I'm with you on the Rico/La Voz Reedgard II and IV, without the grooves.
I've upgraded them, but putting them in a ziploc with a humidity pack.
 

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I have an old aluminium one (flat), and two plastic ones (with grooves). I have never noticed any difference in playability of the reeds. If there is a difference caused by the reed holders, it probably is much smaller than the natural differences between reeds.
 

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I remember years ago when I taught elementary band that the La Voz Reedguards came in multiple colors---red, yellow, blue, green, and black. I recommended them to my saxophone and clarinet students with little success until one student came to class and showed the others how they could be taken apart to "mix" the colors like they could on some of the plastic action toys that were popular. That's all it took. All of the students had to have them. Those were the good old days before they went to black ones that were hard to find in the case in the dark backstage area where you assembled your instrument(s).
 
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