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Discussion Starter #1
hi guys,
i decided to post a link to these written Joe Allard school saxophone lessons i made for someone.
They are basically what i remember of the first basic concept lessons from the old juliard school saxophone department.
my teacher george was a graduate student in the juliard saxophone department at the time of the lessons and one of joes best students.
only one saxophone student was accepted to do graduate work at juliard each year.
they might be helpfull for someone who wants to transition to allard school of playing
or if someone just wants to understand various allard school exercises like overtone exercises in the proper original context.
I'm not sure i have ever read these basics put together in writing before.
but one will often read about the overtone exercises out of context.
These lessons took place in the late 70s.
this is only the basic concepts and will suffer some loss in written form.
everything that came after revolved around these basic ideas.

http://patriot.net/~gary/sax/index.html
 

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The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum
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Thanks, Gary! This is an excellent resource, if not for direct application on every detail, then also as a historical link to Allard's philosophy. Cool!
 

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I still like that old Allard video from the 80's...I wish I could of met that guy. Luckily I had the next best thing...my teacher was a student of his--I got all the ol gems from him...He even had an exact replica of Allard's alto mouthpiece made from the Babbitt company--cool stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #10
one thing i find so interesting about it is how many jazz guys came out of there. not exactly usual for a legit instrument program.
george used to tell me about an exercise the sax quartet would do where someone would stand in the center and using hand signals spell out changes
and they would improvise french style saxophone quartet music as a group on the spot.
whenever i woud try to play a legit sax thing at a lesson george would take it away or reach up a turn it over so i couldn't see it.
it was all about ear and singing through the horn.
whatever kind of music you wantd to play you were in "no reading allowed" land.

the reed making was also totally mind blowing. In the process of trying to teach it to me george would make me the best reeds i have ever played.
I would bring in the reed i was working on and it didn't play well and in about 3 minutes george would fix it and make it perfect.
it was bizarre. he would hold it up to the light and say something like here is the problem, see this fiber right there. it's stiffer than the others so you have to cut that one out.
then the reed would play perfect. one of the reeds he made lasted like 3 months. best reed i ever had ever.
i totally never understood what he was saying and to this day i never figured it out.
it was lke he was doing some kind of magic.
 

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Just read the whole thing. A lot of it was like memory lane from my very first lessons with Scott Grimaldi when I was in 9th or 10th grade. Much of it I had forgotten, especially the thing about the reed by itself on your lip, so I really appreciate that you posted this. I know my teacher had me do that drill with a pencil, but the idea was the same. This thread should be a sticky! It would answer so many questions people have on other threads if they just practiced this stuff for a while. Sadly, probably only people who know Allard's name read this thread, and I'd bet that most of them have had a teacher who studied with him already. This stuff is great for everyone, but the n00bs would benefit SO MUCH!
 

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super great post!
thx!
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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The link is to unedited junk.
True, the way it was written could be improved for publication, but it looks like it's just lesson reminder notes.

There is some important stuff in there.

But then there's this:

"keep a reed in you pocket and do it alot." which gave me little chuckle.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I had noticed previously DanPerezSax you are a fellow Allard school player.
You even wrote about blowing into the end of the reed to test for bubbles on another thread.
that should be some kind of abstract test to see who is and who is not an extended allard student.
writing this junk (and yes it is junk) helped me reconnect with the past and fundamentals as well and helped me move forward a bit.
these very simple concepts really take years to unfold annd sink in. even today they still effect my playing in a positive way.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
"keep a reed in you pocket and do it alot." which gave me little chuckle.
yes the reed is like a talisman and should be inscribed with secret hebrew words and carried in you pocket for magical protection from the plague as often as possible.

I know -- there is a bunch of stuff in there like that. It's very hard for me to describe physical actions with words.
when i sent it to the guy i wrote it for in the first place he thought the point was to ballance the reed on his lip like a circus act.
so if even a fraction of the intended meaning comes through it's a miracle.
 

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Do you have any idea how great a woodwind player Joe Allard was? Are you aware that he is considered to be the greatest mainstream saxophone teacher in history? Any fragment of his advice that is available is priceless, and this post has information that is complete, in context, and direct from Allard himself.
 

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I did get and still have the original VHS tape and little booklet that came with it around the late 80's maybe i don't know but do remember trying the mouth shaping,tongue positions,breathing etc,filed the bottom of my front uneven teeth... i was scratching my head a lot and playing rewind on that damn tape till i just stopped one day thinking this is all about methods and concepts all thought out by this little old guy who has done it all since the 30's, he played with Arturo Toscanini among others. God that has to count for something and along the way with all modesty started a school that was not French or American way of playing saxophone, just Joseph Allard.
 
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