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In the antique trade, things , rare and ancient though they might be , don't always have a value that reflects their rarity or their antiquity but simply their desirability.
A roman vase would be often considerably cheaper in the trade than a Troika, Morecroft or a Clarice Cliff vase.
 

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Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
In other words to be able to put these things on a pedestal you have to love Jazz and to have loved and known the likes of Charlie Parker and John Coltrane and all the other Jazz heroes. I am not sure that the people who will have the most disposable income in the future would know and value the same music heroes whom we value.
In the antique trade, things , rare and ancient though they might be , don't always have a value that reflects their rarity or their antiquity but simply their desirability.
I agree that in the future, those icons from the "golden era" of jazz, may well belong to a "pre golden era", just as today the icons of dixieland are now on a lower pedestal. As the percentage of current greats playing MKVIs wanes, then I believe the MKVI will over the years lose it's cache.

But re" desirability, I believe the Grafton is different, in that it's the looks that count more than anything. I don't think Bird or Ornette used it for it's sound. The MKVI looks just like A.N. Other saxophone, the Grafton doesn't.

Stick it in a display cabinet and put lights inside (no don't, I melted one doing that), and insure it well.
 

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you have a point there! Its looks make it special. Even the Vibratosax capitalised on those looks and some who had the misfortune to buy one as I did, even despite all the present shortcomings, are holding on to it because of its novelty value.
 

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Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
you have a point there! Its looks make it special. Even the Vibratosax capitalised on those looks and some who had the misfortune to buy one as I did, even despite all the present shortcomings, are holding on to it because of its novelty value.
Yes, but I don't think its looks come anywhere near those of the Grafton.
 

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no, not even close
 

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QUOTE=SAXISMYAXE;1638181]Looks like it's sporting a new, custom replacement bell/bow keyguard. Could you post a close up photo of that detail Willema?

Cheers.[/QUOTE]



From his album.

But, this is the most interesting picture in that bunch...

[
 

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Remember that plastics, like everything else, age, change color, become brittle. We don't expect new plastic to shatter when dropped. But 1950s era plastic was a "new thing" - and it had been "new" since the first plastic, bakelite, in the early teens.

In that era plastics were not chemically stable. They often discolored, warped or cracked. There are plastic radios from the 1930s that are worth thousands in certain colors because they turned yellow or brown from the heat of the tubes - or just from the passage of time!

Plastics makers changed formulae a lot to get around that. Every formula was proprietary, a lot of it wasn't extensively tested, and none of it was meant to last forever, or even close.
 
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