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It is definitely a neck from "The" Martin. Nothing else has an octave key design like that.

I notice considerable solder blobs at the neck to tenon joint. It could be that the tenon was replaced in the past.

Is this just a neck by itself for sale, or is it being sold with a horn? (Is the horn a Martin Comm 3?)

As far as value, first of all the condition doesn't look particularly close to new. If it's a full horn, and the rest of the horn looks in similar condition (good not abused but well used condition) then the horn doesn't have the kind of collector value that a super-clean almost-like-brand-new one would, and I would suggest the neck won't really matter to price.

Of course if it's just a neck being sold by itself then who cares about the SN?

The neck may have been replaced at some point, but even then, I doubt that it matters. After all, it's not like Martin had some mystical process of matching necks to instruments in the factory. Let's face it, they had a rack of necks and a rack of bodies, and they grabbed one of each as long as the finishes were the same, and took them over to the SN stamping machine. So from the performance standpoint it won't matter as long as the neck is for the same model instrument, which it is. Remember that many other manufacturers did not and do not serialize necks. If I were a production manager at a saxophone factory I would make a huge stink if the suits wanted to serialize necks, because it would complicate my whole process (what if the neck gets damaged right at the end - then you have to diddle around with the SN list, etc.).

Collectors have introduced this "matching numbers matter" nonsense to saxophones just like they have in cars, and it doesn't matter except that the collector community says it does (with, posssibly, the rare exception of the truly exactly as new instrument, which is really quite rare).
 

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I had a dealer tell me that the newer Martins did not put serial #s on the necks. The example in question was a 302,xxx era, around 1966 I guess.
He also said that the serial #s on the horn itself were small and stamped vertically instead of horizontally.
I hope someone here with more knowledge than me can either confirm or deny this (he was a salesman after all :) )

Another interesting quirk with this particular horn was that it actually says "Committee" on it. Interestingly uncommon...
Pic attached


Com III.jpg
 
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