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Discussion Starter #1
Until my friend can get his horn to a real tech, I'm helping him regulate it.

The left hand pearls are not level - with the B much lower than the bis (nearly 3/8") and both the B and bis lower than the Alt F and the G. Is this typical?

Also the high F key swings too open (I think), looks like there may have been a cork under the side key to keep the F from opening too much. How far should that key open and is under the side key where a cork should go?

Thanks for your help,

Mark
 

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bari keys

I had similar (but not that extreme!) problems at one point with my bari - however, I dont think this is typical. My tech fixed it so that they are now correct (ie. much more level, with bis a tiny bit lower, so you can roll on the first finger B - Bb). I initially fixed the problem myself - succeeded up to a point ! - quite a complicated set of tweaks because of the interdependencies between the key heights. My tech also mentioned that the bari's tend to play sharp hence you dont want really close keys on the upper stack. You want the pads at the correct height and then adjust the remaining pearls accordingly - my recollection is that there's the ability to adjust B and Bb height independent of pad height (is that right?).

My recollection is that the high F (on the left hand) goes along for the ride - ie. it opens because of the B (???) spring or one of those left hand hand keys but its movement is limited by a cork on the back side of the horn. (make sense?)

Im in a different city than the sax so I cant do the obvious thing and just look!
 

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I have a Martin Committee bari (second series, 1961 or so) that I picked up at a vintage horn store. I'm pretty sure it had spent 30+ years kicking around in a high school band room, and it was like a 1950 Ford pickup that had been rode hard and put up wet. All the keywork was off kilter, and it sounded (the mechanics, not the voice of the horn) like a printing press when played. After my tech got done with it, it was super. The only chronic problem I have with it involves the octave key mechanism: it's a wonderfully ingenious design, that rocking mechanism, but it seems very easily to get out of adjustment: it's a bit more tricky than I feel comfortable with adjusting myself, so when that happens, back to the shop, and all is well for 5-6 months. Great horn.

But the point is: I agree, the problem you're having is not endemic to the instrument, and it can be fixed (I think).
 

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The answer to your The Martin Committee Baritone's drifting front High F is on the key itself. There is a notched area on the pearl key arm where it travels under another key rod. This is where you need to put a bit of cork sheet or thick ultra suede to prevent any upward travel of the key, and allow only downward motion upon pressing.

That will solve the upward swinging F key dilemma completely.

The B key problem is also either a bent key, or cork foot height issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The horn's in hand.

I wrote the High F - but I was mistaken.

The high E pad activated by the side key is the one I'm wondering about, how far it should open? The key feels like it goes down too far and the pad ends up a long ways from the tone hole. There is a thin rubber pad under this side key now, but it doesn't do much - too thin.

Looks like the only place to put a bumper - I guess the rule of thumb on key opening height is - open enough to be in tune and not so closed as to make the timbre much different than adjacent notes?

That octave mech is pretty interesting... little out of whack right now.

I hope to have the regulation close enough to play test tonight, looking forward to it.
 

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The high E side key shouldn't open too much, maybe 6mm to 8mm maximum, from the outer edge of the cup to the tone hole rim.

There should be quite a thick felt or cork piece under the keytouch itself to check the key from opening too much. The piece on my Martin Committee Bari is 8mm thick. Make sure that you use compressed cork or felt, so that it maintains the same height over time.
 

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Often times the problem is that the spatula/touchpiece of the lengthy high E key has either been bent horizontally or vertically from it's designed position. I'm thinking vertically in this instance. SIMA is correct that the open key height limit must be corrected, either by bending the key back into proper position, or adding bumper material to the contact point, or a combination of both.
 
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