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Discussion Starter #1
The Mark 6 Sop from which year has the best intonation ? heard that those from the later years, like from the end of 70s, have the best jazz tone, which is brighter than those from the earlier years. What about intonation? And heard that the legend of 6 digi doesn't apply to sop , but only to Alto and Tenor. Any idea?
 

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The Mark 6 Sop from which year has the best intonation ? heard that those from the later years, like from the end of 70s, have the best jazz tone, which is brighter than those from the earlier years. What about intonation? And heard that the legend of 6 digi doesn't apply to sop , but only to Alto and Tenor. Any idea?
I've never known a MKVI soprano with what I call decent intonation, especially compared to odern sopranos.

You seem to have heard a lot of legends, not really based on fact.

Who is to say a brighter tone (if it was true) is a better jazz tone?

Legends og 6 digi applying to alto and tenor?

I would just try the horn out and if you like the sound, tuning and feel thewn that's the best one for you. foregt serial numbersor years.
 

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I have a first year mark vi sop and the intonation is incredible.
i also just sold a 72,xxx and the intonation was excellent on that too.
 

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I've owned a few from various years and the intonation varied. V1's have a lot of handwork hence the variety. The best playing one I had was a 1977 model I forget the serial...the scale on that one was superb and I wish I still had it. My current V1 is a very late one.

The reason why people say the later models have better tuning is Selmer altered the neck at some point which has a noticable change in bore about half way up. The later ones have slightly less resistance but the more sought after earlier ones have a richer sound and more resistance.

Thanks Mark....They are beautiful horns !!! If I win the lottery I'll be there.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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Reading the original question, I think the year still has to come...
 

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Hi,
My 72 xxx has very good intonation - but on the other hand it was my main horn for a long time and I've played it a lot so maybe I'm compensating without being aware of it. Carl
 

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Discussion Starter #11
it seems that one can't tell the intonation of the 6 by just looking at the serial number or year of production...
 

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Joke aside, your last statement is probably right. As you can read and discover at many places on this forum or elsewhere, the soprano sax in general has remained in some kind of backlog behind alto and tenor in it's development until the 70s. The MkVI clearly belongs to "before", and therefore is touchier when it comes to intonation (among other characteristics).
Adding to that Selmer's still very handmade nature by then, specially on the "low volume" horns, each individual specimen will have it's own ups and downs. So you really have to try each specific horn and discover by yourself how it plays.
And be prepared, this is no joke, the MkVI is not an easy soprano, specially compared to modern "post Yamaha 62" horns.
As someone mentioned in another thread, the MKVI will be more appreciated by a dedicated soprano player who will grow into it, than by a "doubler", who will find it much easier on a japanese or even taiwanese horn.
 

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I once owned a VI soprano and eventually sold it because of the intonation issues and a weak high end. But then a few months ago, I stumbled upon an almost pristine VI soprano on consignment at a local store. It was the exact opposite of the one I used to own and the several that I'd played in the past. Great intonation, wonderful and powerful high end (not that I play up there, but for that one note when appropriate, a good one is desired), and a big full tone. It is now my first choice soprano and I'm enjoying the heck out of it. The serial number puts it being made in 1972. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #14
i really hope i can get one of those.... with gd intonation and tone....
I once owned a VI soprano and eventually sold it because of the intonation issues and a weak high end. But then a few months ago, I stumbled upon an almost pristine VI soprano on consignment at a local store. It was the exact opposite of the one I used to own and the several that I'd played in the past. Great intonation, wonderful and powerful high end (not that I play up there, but for that one note when appropriate, a good one is desired), and a big full tone. It is now my first choice soprano and I'm enjoying the heck out of it. The serial number puts it being made in 1972. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #16
the serial number suggest this horn is from year 1979. I am surprised it has a dark sound. THe late Mark VIs are more toward the bright side, or so i read.
I have a VI soprano serial number: N.299XXX. It has a dark sound and very good intonation and solid action.
 

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V1's can be whatever you want depending on you , your taste/ ears / choice of piece / reed... but mostly your concept.
This applies to altos and tenors as well of course. This to me is what makes MKVI's great. That flexibility is, for me, the MKVI 'thing'.
 
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