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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy folks,

Just gifted a very rough alto, that in all honesty probably needs a complete overhaul (pads and cork and dent removal galore), but I cannot track down the serial number on any of the lists for some reason, and was curious if anyone had ever come across it. Pretty unique feeling ergos and left hand thumb-rest. I'll toss in a couple of photos just for good measure. Any rough estimates on cost of repair / overall value / date manufactured (honestly any information) would be appreciated. I'm sincerely doubting whether or not an overhaul would make financial sense, but I'd love your opinions!
 

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these are lovely sounding saxophones,and very low cost.
made in about 1950 or so were the cheaper model by martin.
probably not worth the financial cost of an overhaul,but i recommend to take it to a saxophone tech,as it might just need a few pads replaced and a service.
neck is very important,(photo),and those dents i see on the body can be just left alone.
good luck,and let us know what the tech says.
 

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Thank you very much. Tossed on some neck photos (above), the previous owner had wrapped it in tape so attempt to replace the lack of a cork, so it is in abysmal shape.
 

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Unfortunately there is literally zero cork, the octave key doesn't function, and existing pad seal-age is minimal, so it is not playable at this point.
 

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WilboH, If I remember correctly you had sold your last sax to pay for college. You were saving for your dream horn but I don’t remember what. Obviously you acquired something of a MARTIN. Hey spend a few bucks get it playable. Or figure out how to do some of the repairs yourself. Tons of support for you here. Something is better than nothing. It doesn’t have to be perfect. It may even surprise you. I actually like the way that it looks, nicely aged patina. As for the value. Priceless.
 

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These are great when in playing condition. This was the first alto that I purchased when I started playing again after many years away.
I was not looking for anything in particular, but an alto at a lower cost. This was listed in our local newspaper.
It had the same lacquered body and nickel plated keys, reminding me of one of the earlier Committee horns. They play like the older Handcraft Committee model.
I bought it unplayable with old, probably original pads and found a few cork key spacers fell off. After a bit of tweaking I was amazed how it played and sounded even though it needed an overhaul.
If you cannot do the work yourself, you might consider getting an estimate for repair. The cost to repair may exceed the value of the horn.
I played mine for a few years and then moved on to an Indiana tenor. That alto started my admiration of Martin Saxophones.
 

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Looks a lot like my Handcraft Committee I with nickel plated instead of solid keywork and no adjustable right hand hook. Probably plays very well, mine has excellent intonation and tone, more of a sweet tone than the more brash bright sound of a Conn.

Think about picking up a few supplies and a heat gun and doing the pad and cork replacement yourself. These horns have a very low value on the resale market but they are good horns nevertheless. With lacquer like that you can't really hurt anything as long as you don't take on dent work or soldering work yourself. If you find a leaky tone hole you can probably just seal it with clear nail polish like I have done before.
 

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this one originally had the adjustable thumbhook,its just fallen or been taken off,and a normal one soldered on.check the photo there.
yes,these are great sounding cheap martin saxophones.
Yes, if you look just above the thumb hook you can see where the adjustable thumbrest mount was originally soldered to the body tube.
I also had a Committee 2 alto at the same time as the Indiana alto and the necks would fit and tighten in the receiver when swapped. They would not play this way (in the upper octave) as the octave loop on one of the horns was too high for the linkage to operate it. It worked for one of the setups and not the other. Other than the keywork being different, the Committee was nicer, to me they played and sounded mostly the same. I sold the Committee II and kept the Indiana.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you all for your feedback. I've started a new job so I haven't been able to get this thing in to a tech, but it is on the list, and I will assuredly keep you updated on my findings. On a positive note, regardless of whether or not the investment is worth it, with the new gig I should have either this fixed up or that dream tenor within a few months! Can't come soon enough! Thank you again for all your kind words and assistance.
 
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