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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

I think one of the most important things about learning is Listening!

Maybe Listening is even more important than playing a lot of hours, so this post suits this:

1- Share your most important albums!
2- Bob as a shelf full of music, can you share to us what albums were the most important to you?
3- Share some solos that made you think "OMG, I have to transcribe that!"

Good Luck!
Regards, Pedro
 

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1) Probably a toss-up between Such Sweet Thunder, Ellington at Newport, or Charlie Parker with Strings.
2) Verve Jazz Masters: Charlie Parker was the very first jazz album I picked up when I really started listening in high school.
3) Johnny Hodges' solo on Funky Blues, and I'm working on his rendition of I Got It Bad from Newport right now.
 

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1. Ethiopiques Vol. 4 (the instrumental album) of great ethiopian jazz compilation series of music from the late 60's/early 70's. Some cool catchy tunes and solos.
2. Hank Mobley - Soul Station - the first album that made me want to compose Jazz tunes (and I love his tone and his solos.)
3. I'm not a transcribe guy, but Lou Donaldson's solo on "The Scorpion" from the live in Newark album also called The Scorpion, compelled me to figure out what he was playing (guitarist Melvin Sparks also takes a great solo.)
 

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WAY too many to list here....(I realize this is not a satisfactory answer)
 

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I don't quite understand the differentiation between 1) and 2), so I combine them here in my reply.


1-2) Heavy Weather, Weather Report; Relaxin', Miles; Modern Art, Art Pepper; Catching the Sun, Spyro Gyra; Homecoming, Dexter Gordon; and of course Blues and the Abstract Truth, Oliver Nelson.

(understand - I am not saying these repreesent the apex of jazz playing, necessarily. But rather, IMHO, they are near-perfect albums/efforts, in composition , playing, and production combined ~ which is what I interpret "Greatest Albums" to mean ).

(BTW - Soul Station...:|....dammit, yeah that's pretty friggin' close, too)

3) I actually don't transcribe and try to play others' solos (although I used to transcribe many songs in order to have charts which were not available)...I just appreciate others' solos, and may at times quote a few a bit....
 

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I don't really have the patience to transcribe full solos, but I'll lift individual phrases that I really like and try to figure out what makes them work.

Here are the albums that made we want to play the saxophone in the order I discovered them:

1. Sonny Rollins - Live At The Village Vanguard

2. Dexter Gordon - Go

3. Fela Kuti - Shuffering and Shmiling/No Agreement

4. Jackie McLean - Swing, Swang, Swingin'

5. Hank Mobley - Really, I could pick almost any Mobley album, but I'm going to be different and go with "Workout."

6. Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis 4 – Montreux '77

7. Charlie Rouse - Unsung Hero

8. Tina Brooks - Complete Blue Note Recordings
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't quite understand the differentiation between 1) and 2), so I combine them here in my reply.


1-2) Heavy Weather, Weather Report; Relaxin', Miles; Modern Art, Art Pepper; Catching the Sun, Spyro Gyra; Homecoming, Dexter Gordon.

(understand - I am not saying these repreesent the apex of jazz playing, necessarily. But rather, IMHO, they are near-perfect albums/efforts, in composition , playing, and production combined ~ which is what I interpret "Greatest Albums" to mean ).

(BTW - Soul Station...:|....dammit, yeah that's pretty friggin' close, too)

3) I actually don't transcribe and try to play others' solos (although I used to transcribe many songs in order to have charts which were not available)...I just appreciate others' solos, and may at times quote a few a bit....
Sorry, Bob is a teacher of mine (Bob Reynolds, he has a quite few vlogs on youtube, you should check that out!

What don't you transcribe? :)
 

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What don't you transcribe? :)
Solos....

3- Share some solos that made you think "OMG, I have to transcribe that!"
I have never had that thought, basically. Although I have had the thought "if there's no chart anywhere for that tune, I wanna transcribe one" ;) And I have thought "oooh, nice lick, I gotta learn that one"...

I would Like you to list some artists that you listen to :)
Pssssst...that's a different question than what your thread is about. :mrgreen:
Stick with your original questions....folks around here can tend to lose focus rather quickly, sometimes....:compress:
 

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Perhaps my most important albums musically were

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Might_as_Well_Be_Swing
My father's album I heard often as a child.

2. https://www.allmusic.com/album/homecoming-live-at-the-village-vanguard-mw0000310112
The album that defined jazz for me.
After all these years I still listen to this one regularly

While the stack of vinyl would be too tall to see over, and too wide to step around without making a trip, and the CDs would require a truck to move, I would say that these two albums had the biggest influence.

In the pop area ----
This was a significant song in high school
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8zLGZi7-Yk

along with
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRE9vMBBe10
 

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I saw and heard-in-person my first soprano saxophone when I was 16 years old. The two guys who each played one (in different bands at a concert) were Joe Darensbourg and George Probert. That experience led me to buy one and learn how to play it.

Those guys had recorded with many bands and I bought their LP's (an LP by the Teddy Buckner band with Joe; and "The Firehouse Five plus Two Goes South" with George).

The specific tunes were Joe playing soprano on "My Bucket's Got A Hole In It", and George on "Milenburg Joys". When I actually met George, he turned me onto Sidney Bechet. After that, the albums are too numerous to mention here.

There was jazz before bebop. DAVE
 

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Important albums to me: Charlie Parker--Return Engagement, Paul Desmond--Pure Desmond

Solos to transcribe: Flip Phillips (Jam Blues), Dexter Gordon (Darn that Dream), Herb Geller (can't remember the tune but it's on an album with early Maynard)
 
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