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SOTW Interviews/Editor, Distinguished SOTW Member,
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1955-65 witnessed a musical revolution as the sax reigned supreme on the charts. Before taking a look at the more well-known players and solos, here's a listen to some outstanding players and solos from the 1950's that played a critical role. Other suggestions, of course, are most welcome as are your personal favorites (favourites) from the following.

Also, throughout, my standard reference is John Laughter's incredible and invaluable resource "The History Of 'Top 40' Saxophone Solos- 1955-to date".

- 1:16 mark- Jesse Powell- 1955

- :58 mark- Jimmy Wright- 1956

- -39 mark and 1:46- Herb Hardesty- 1957

- 1:02 mark- Chuck Rio- 1958

- 1:16 mark- Gil Bernal

- 1:20 mark- Johnny Parker- 1959 (not completely clear who did solo but in terms of tone alone, I'll go with JM's long term sax player)
 

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SOTW Interviews/Editor, Distinguished SOTW Member,
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Discussion Starter #2
And by request, one more.

- :27, 1:10, 1:54 marks- Grady Gaines- 1958
 

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SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
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Hey Neil. I appreciate it. One correction; "Yep" was Steve Douglas. Awesome postings! Also the "History" has been updated and is now in PDF format for emailing. Over 500 pages and free for the asking. Just send a PM with your email address.
 

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Great stuff!
I love it.
Rocking around the Christmas Tree and Sh-boom by The Chords, are two of my favorite sax solos from the 50s.
To me, they are so classic that you have to play them just as they are if you’re doing them at a gig. Everyone expects them to be note for note, and I think that’s what makes up a really classic and memorable solo.


Phil Woods “Just the way you are” solo and Clarence’s “Born to run” are the same way to me in terms of more modern day solos.
 

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Yowzaa, I was learning that stuff in junior high in the Bronx.
I apologise if I am making this too much about me but this is from 1964 and one of those guys sang Keep a Knockin through his guitar amp.
 

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I'm Walkin' with the two Herb Hardesty solos — absolute tenor magic. Hardesty's work with Fats was a major reason I took up tenor. Another gem of a Hardesty solo is on Fats's Let the Four Winds Blow.
 

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That’s a good challenging mix this week. Going to give them all another round before making a call.
Tequila....lol I think that was the first song on Tenor I ever played.

5/22 edit

Love the playing by Chuck Rio, it’s a sax song ....
I’m going to go with Grady Gaines solo spots this week. Two short solos that standout.
Although I don’t care for the overall song much.
 

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I really like Jesse Powell’s solo, but it’s not even fair having to compare to Grady Gaines on knocking.
 

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I’m going to go with Grady Gaines solo spots this week. Two short solos that standout.
Although I don’t care for the overall song much.
When this song hit the jukeboxes some teenagers went a little crazy on the dance floor, and while cruzin around town. At one sock hop the adult in charge took this 45rpm off of the record player after it had played just a few seconds. Little Richard had a few adults worried!:)
 

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Do they still have those? I remember being wounded at one of those in junior high. Got a big splinter in my foot when my sock hooked up. I’m sure that Little Richard song was the rage of the day
 
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