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Discussion Starter · #61 ·

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Yeah, there it is...good image. That's what I mean...it just looks more comfortable to hold and play than either a straight or conventionall curved one....
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
The history of saxophone production by E.A. Couturier will be continued very likely in October. Thank you for your patience.:)

Felix
 

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Thank you, Mr. LaPorte for all your work. It is deeply appreciated. I have played vintage horns for 40 years, but never heard of a Couturier until your valued contributions. I have since restored a C melody and an alto. Both were very impressive horns. I see Lyon and Healy C melodys finally fetching good EBay prices, perhaps due to this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Circumstances are forcing me to cut back my activities at present.
 

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alto: 82Zii/Medusa, tenor: Medusa, bari: B-901, sop: sc-990
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Thank you, Mr. LaPorte for all your work. It is deeply appreciated.
I agree. LaPorte (Felix) has already changed the history of Holton on my "Serial number Registry" thread. Now he may do the same thing for Curturier and York.
 

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alto: 82Zii/Medusa, tenor: Medusa, bari: B-901, sop: sc-990
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Circumstances are forcing me to cut back my activities at present.

"Why is it that, train as we may for breath control, and practice as we will for technical perfection, we .. must remain at the mercy of an imperfect instrument?" (E.A.Couturier)
I hope you are in good health. That is a very interesting quote from Mr Couturier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 · (Edited)
On request I bring forward following matter:

How to identify a LaPorte made saxophone.

All following statements are based on my own examinations and researches.

I recommend not to rely on one feature alone as there are similiarities which can be found on saxophones of different manufacturers as well as differences which easily could be changed e.g. keyguards. Note that there are some positive related features but also features which exclude a LaPorte origin.

And of course there are features that can be identified on good photos but there are some - and that are the most reliable - which requires the real object of examination e.g. measurements of the body!

All LaPorte made saxophones

1. have split bell keys except straight sopranos.

2. are lacking front F.

3. have thick simple bevelled toneholes (handcrafted, therefore slightly varying in shape) soldered onto the body. I call them „LaPorte Type" as most saxophones made since 1922 equipped with this type of bevelled toneholes were produced in LaPorte. Saxophones produced at the same time (twenties) by Martin have thick bevelled toneholes, too. But unlike those made in Laporte they have usually an inward sloping rim.

What makes things more complicated: Martin saxophones made between 1918 and ca.1921 and some stencils are lacking this feature, they look like the LaPorte type ones! So not all saxophones with 'LaPorte Type' toneholes are made in LaPorte! Vice versa: Saxophones with toneholes other than 'LaPorte Type' are not made in LaPorte.

4. have serial numbers in the range of 6,xxx and 19,xxx as well as 200,xxx and 203,xxx (except Holton Collegiate I which are not considered here). Possibly there are very rare exceptions. Still researching.

5. All numbers are written in a straight line e.g. with an „A" above for alto saxophone and an „L" beneath for „Low Pitch". There never can be found the term „LOW PITCH" like stamped on Martin made saxophones. Since 1926 (1925 on the 'Perfect Curved Soprano') "PAT APPLD FOR" was supplemented.

6. LaPorte made saxophone bodies are larger bored than any other contemporary make. Trying (e.g.) to fix a martin neck on a LaPorte saxophone, you will be very surprised how much the difference in diameter is!

7. LaPorte made saxophone bodies (comparing examinations on numerous alto saxophones) are longer than any other make. Accordingly their necks are shorter (otherwise they would have a pitch which is much too low).

There are more indications which I will explain when presenting some info about model history.

Felix
 

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Wonderful!

Is it time for a Couturier area here?
 

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I'm really excited to read this thread. I have a true curved soprano by the brand name "Harmony" that I have no idea of its make. It's stamped "low pitch", is made in Elkhart, and has the "scalloped" bevels around each tone hole. The samples that have been displayed within this thread (of various breeds) are the closest I've seen to mine from a conceptual design point of view. I haven't played it much and in fact was once considering turning it into a table lamp. :shock: But I've never had the heart to do so. I'll post a few pics when I can and maybe one of you could confirm the make of this horn.

More to come.
 

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I'd like to see that. How high does the keying go? (High E, High F?)
 

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Not that I'm an expert, and it is extra hard to identify sopranos, but I see the so-called "Pontiac" ribbed body tube joint bands that suggest Martin. Also, Martin had rather large block capital letters proclaiming "LOW PITCH." Pontiac autos had a wide strip down the center of the hood for decades, up till the mid 50s, similar to those.

minous; I'd really like to find out the actual maker though. Any ideas? [URL="http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz300/minous_bucket/P9150578.jpg" said:
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
... I see the so-called "Pontiac" ribbed body tube joint bands that suggest Martin. Also, Martin had rather large block capital letters proclaiming "LOW PITCH."
I agree.

BTW no regular shaped curved sopranos were built in LaPorte. Only straight ones and the 'Perfect Curved Soprano' (1925/1926) made by Lyon&Healy also sold under the tradename "American Professional".
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
I would love to read some more infomation about Couturier, unfortunately I don't have anything to add but I do love saxophone manufacturer history.

Not to stray too far off topic, but one thing that is often seen is Couturier stencils that are incorrectly attributed to Martin due to the bevelled tone holes. For instance, there's a soprano on JunkDude's site stencilled "J.H. Troup" that he calls a Martin stencil, but it is obviously not made by Martin. Is this a Couturier stencil?

https://www.junkdude.com/ProductDetail.aspx?id_product=151
New researches make it nessesary to revise my answer given in Reply #5.

Some special features indicate this soprano as being made in LaPorte, but the serial number - given it is correctly told by the seller - speaks against my conclusion. The addition 'LP' beneath the SN

neither indicates a Martin nor a LaPorte made origin. Still searching .. .
 

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... I see the so-called "Pontiac" ribbed body tube joint bands that suggest Martin. Also, Martin had rather large block capital letters proclaiming "LOW PITCH."
I agree.

BTW no regular shaped curved sopranos were built in LaPorte. Only straight ones and the 'Perfect Curved Soprano' (1925/1926) made by Lyon&Healy also sold under the tradename "American Professional".
Thanks guys, very much. My horn's "LOW PITCH" is printed exactly as you suggest. And since reading your answers I've found another "Harmony" soprano listed in a post under the Martin section. That instrument is a straight sample, but nonetheless it gives support to your thoughts. Again, thanks for the insight.
 

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Thanks for all the info. Attached are some pics of my Courtier soprano. The bell says "Made by Courtier LaPorte Ind".
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Thanks for all the info. Attached are some pics of my Courtier soprano. The bell says "Made by Courtier LaPorte Ind".
Your Bb sprano is an important piece of saxophone history as it bears one of the highest serial numbers (#10468) stamped on a Couturier (LaPorte) made saxophone engraved:

Made by
Couturier
LaPorte IND​

That means it was made just before the company went into receivership Oct. 1923. Nearly all saxphones produced since then by Couturier were ordered by Lyon&Healy until the Couturier Band Instrument Company was sold to L&H 1924.

Thank you for your input. Nice photos!
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Starting an own company: The 'E. A. Couturier Co., Ltd.'



soon to be continued ..
 
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