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Commercial posting - affiliate/shill video removed
I have done a review about the Emeo.
The Emeo is designed to be a practice horn. It wasn't designed to be a performance instrument or replacement of the traditional saxophone. I doesn't have onboard sounds , but it comes with a very innovative software Respiro designed for the wind controllers. You can easily play staccato, it has a dynamic response. I explained this part in my video.
Also the sound library is very cool. The Respiro offers a variety of rich sounds, some of them are very unique or experimental. The Emeo team didn't include many saxophone sounds on purpose. I believe it's a decision of good taste. I personally don't like saxophone samples. I am very happy with the Emeo and I am planning to make more videos showing all the things I can practice with it. So far it was my best experience with the MIDI wind controllers.
 

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They have some selection of the saxophone sounds, but in the manual you can read this: "Note that we did not put a saxophone sound in the collection - we did this on purpose, to emphasize that we are not trying to make the Emeo sound like a conventional saxophone."
 

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You can use the Emeo for the performance playing as well. I am not sure if you could watch my video, but I actually talked about it. Anyway, I will soon make another video where I will show again the potential of the Emeo. Seems to me that people still don't understand what they could do with the Emeo and how useful instrument it actually is.
 

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I agree completely with this. Furthermore, I suspect that the intersection of saxophone players who (1) are willing and able to pay twice as much for the Emeo for its more authentic feel, and (2) don't have access to practice space is pretty small. This is why I worry about the future of the Emeo, even though I really like the concept.

The Synthophone that @milandro linked to in post #3 was developed around a similar concept, but it was even more expensive (around $3000 in 2004) and remained a pretty niche instrument as a result (I can't find evidence for more than about a dozen Synthophone players).

Incidentally, another significant disadvantage that diminishes the Emeo's suitability for live performance is that, unlike the Synthophone, the YDS-150, or many other EWIs, it provides no onboard method at all for bending pitches (many EWIs have a bite sensor, while the YDS-150 has a thumb-controlled "analog controller").
I could talk to the Emeo team and they are not interested in producing on a massive scale. So I wouldn't worry about their future. I'm sure some people will be interested in getting the Emeo.
If you could see my video, I play a hand made alto saxophone by Amsterdam Winds. This is an expensive but magical instrument. And here is the same situation, the company is also not interested to produce on a large scale, but to create something unique. I'm actually really interested in seeing the future of the Emeo. The people who built this practice instrument are highly intelligent, technical experts and musicians. For those who doesn't know, The Emeo is made in Israel, in one of the most innovative countries in the technology.
Now, when it goes to practice space, I live in the house isolated by the nature in Norway. I can play as a wish, but I like the idea to play outside after the Covid is over (always at home is tiring) or just enjoy my day and practice in the late afternoon with the Emeo. It's not only about a silent practice. The Respiro included with the Emeo is a very innovative software too! It's a very interesting tool for music production and for the performance playing too. By the way, I prefer not to have onboard sounds. I can apply any changes by one click, adjust all effects and modify the sounds as I wish.
 

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Guys, no offense, but since I have posted my video, I have received lots of messages from people with no background in science, engineering or at least some interest in innovative technology. People who doubt about the Emeo and doubt about the Emeo´s future. (Because this is the internet, and they know everything about the instrument they have never tried, right?)
Meanwhile, I am enjoying a new reality as a saxophonist. The digital practice horn, which makes me save time, money, easy to take anywhere. In Norway Spring is here, temperatures are rising and I can't wait to sit down with my Emeo in our garden, watching birds and playing.
If 1550$ is too expensive for you, well let me say, there are girls going wild for the designer´s bags and shoes paying double, even triple price of the Emeo. Some people also want a quality, instead of some kind plastic piece of instrument. (no offense)
You said, at the higher price you would rather buy another saxophone. And what's the point to get another loud saxophone ? Where is the progress or solution?

 

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I think with all these devices folks continually want it to be something that it just can't be.
There are performance EWIs, and that is their role, not to be an electronic sax, but something in its own right.
There are practice tools that are closer in to saxes via keyword designs, that, if creative, can be used as performance for sure, but do not come close to replicating a sax.
It is a lofty goal to duplicate sax electronically and allow for all the expression and nuance, but the closer you get, with ergos the same, the more costly it becomes.
You could combine all the best features of all the options and you still wouldn't have a reasonably priced electronic sax, and I doubt any of us will ever see one in our lifetime.
At the higher price points, I would rather just buy another sax.
Guys, no offense, but since I have posted my video, I have received lots of messages from people with no background in science, engineering or at least some interest in innovative technology. People who doubt about the Emeo and doubt about the Emeo´s future. (Because this is the internet, and they know everything about the instrument they have never tried, right?)
Meanwhile, I am enjoying a new reality as a saxophonist. The digital practice horn, which makes me save time, money, easy to take anywhere. In Norway Spring is here, temperatures are rising and I can't wait to sit down with my Emeo in our garden, watching birds and playing (silently!)
If 1550$ is too expensive for you, well let me say, there are girls going wild for the designer bags and shoes paying double, even triple price of the Emeo. Some people also want a quality, instead of some kind plastic piece of instrument. (no offense)
You said, at the higher price you would rather buy another saxophone. And what's the point to get another loud saxophone ? Where is the progress or the solution?
 

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Is it a review or a commercial?

Well, is it a practice instrument or a performance instrument? If you are to be the company spokesperson, make a consistent message.

Then perhaps you don't need to press their product to a saxophone forum that you previously had no interest in.

Why should the country of origin matter? And if it does, what is the heritage and tradition of the saxophone in Israel?

Again, I suggest you make your message consistent.

FWIW, I have background in science, engineering, and innovation. I applaud Emeo's creation, but question some of their decisions. True, I have not played it, but I would observe a couple of opportunities that are evident right away. Given the price of necks that don't require high precision in their internal geometry, I suggest incorporating an alto sax neck and dropping the straight-neck interface. An oversized sop that weighs more than a real horn is not going to have the correct angles to mimic good practice ergonomics. I also suggest that they find a way to adjust the air flow resistance. This instrument looks like it has a very small port, similar to the Yamaha devices, and that back pressure is one of the downsides to me of playing instruments like these.

Consider your messaging. Are you trying to target musicians or girls buying pretty playthings? This is offensive (no offense).

P.S. I see from a very brief web search that you seem to sell yourself as a saxophone influencer. I wish that women could represent a product without displaying themselves in such makeup and clothing (no offense).

The principal subject here is the Emeo and Respiro software.
Since I posted the review about the Emeo, I had the read the most stereotypes and sexist assumptions based on my look. People seem unable to remain focused on the subject, which is the Emeo and they are questioning whenever I am good enough to make a review.
It's absolutely ridiculous. There are other people doing videos, but because there are not female musicians, it's ok!
I have several videos on my YouTube. This is my 3td review.
If something is great, I will recommend it.
For me to make a video about the Emeo was the chance to introduce this fantastic instrument.
I didn't receive any payment for making this video.
I will make another video in the near future, because I love the Emeo. Definitely, I will not post my upcoming video in the group of people unable to remain focused on the topic, and bring to the conversation my fashion outfits. Hopefully, someone looking like a potato will make a review in the near future, so you can learn more about this fantastic instrument.
 

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You don't get it, Felicity. You are the one making the "review" into a fashion statement. Let's see if you can sell a product without the "fashion". Show us that a female musician can sell her music regardless of how much of her body she shows. Can you play as good as a man, or is "fashion" compensating for talent?
Are you a fashion expert? Why nobody is asking me about the Emeo, or about the Imoxplus Respiro? You said that you have experience in the scientific field, but you seem to me incapable of concentrating on the subject.
For your information, I could wear a potato bag and look classy. I apologize for your disappointment, but I am European. We like to look and smell good.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I posted my video with an intention to give some information to the people who are interested about the world's first digital practice horn and Imoxplus Respiro.
If it weren't for the pandemic, I would be touring and I certainly wouldn't have had time to make videos. I make videos with the help of my boyfriend at home to have something creative to do and remain sane, as the world recovers.
I really find the Emeo as fantastic solution for the people who can't practice during this Covid crisis, or want to stay out and practice, because, honestly it's sickening to stay always at home.
If you would watch my review, you would understand that the Emeo is a practice instrument, but also could be a great performance instrument, it's a great tool for music production etc.
I would recommend you to be less judgmental and keep the conversation where it should be.
Thanks!
 

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Yes, I do have a lifetime of experience in the scientific field, and much of that time was spent mentoring young women trying to have their voices heard, and earning parity in a field dominated by men. It is tough for women to be respected for their talents and skills. Can a woman be taken seriously?

I don't doubt that you could rock a potato sack. I wonder if your music would sell as well on the radio.
Well, then you have to create a group about this topic, where you can gossip about me and my capabilities.
Here the topic is the Emeo, MIDI wind controller.
If you have nothing to ask about it, I will ignore your messages.
Adios
 

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From your question, I understand that you didn't watch my video or didn't pay attention, because I explained in my video that, the Emeo allows to adjust resistance. The Emeo has three possible settings. Soft, medium and hard. It comes with a standard alto sax mouthpiece,and special, flexible, antibacterial mouthpiece, but you can also use your own mouthpiece or blow without any mouthpiece at all.
I have made some technical comments. Can you respond to the perceived air resistance of the Emeo? Is it, for instance, comparable to a moderate tip opening and medium strength reed of a sop? Could it be adjusted to provide air resistance similar to your alto sax?
 

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Perhaps you should read my question. I asked you to compare the perceived resistance to a real instrument that we might be familiar with. Soft/medium/hard is not very descriptive in absolute terms - a free-blowing oboe is still more resistant than a stuffy tuba.
I thought you were a fashion expert.
The Emeo is made for saxophone players. I think everyone can imagine how soft, medium, and hard reeds could be. It's basically the same. I use medium resistance with the Emeo, compared to the conventional saxophone it corresponds to 2 and half reeds.
If you want more information, please visit Specs & Manual | The Emeo
You can find the instructional video and manual.
 

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It needn't be either/or though. For example, the YDS-150 can be used either with the onboard sounds, or with a wider variety of sounds by connecting it to external midi software (including Respiro). It's just nice, for practice/portability purposes, to have the option of not having to carry extra equipment.

Regarding your video: thanks for making it. I think you do include a lot of information about the Emeo, but found that the useful information (for me at least) was mostly in the more conversational second half of your video (after the 7:45 minute mark). I suspect that many people stop watching during the first half because the tone and production style make it seem like a slick advertisement/endorsement rather than a substantive review.
Thank you for appreciating my video. So far the video is performing very well on YouTube. Retention of people's attention isn't not my concern.
I made it for the people who are interested to know what is the Emeo.
Those people will watch the entire video, I believe.
 

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If I were a snarky person, I might say that I thought you were a saxophone player. I make no posture about being a fashion expert. This is a saxophone forum.

Surely you have experienced the difference in resistance between a soprano and an alto sax - even with the same reed strength, the resistance is different. And you would also know that a 2 1/2 reed can feel very different depending on the choice of mouthpiece.

Regarding the Emeo size - it looks very similar to the body of an alto sax. Yes, I saw that you measured its overall length. Could you compare it to your alto to see if the key spacing is the same? I find it hard to believe that Emeo would reinvent a mechanism that is neither sop or alto. Have they shared with you where they source their mechanism? I wonder if they actually make the entire body and mechanism, or buy them elsewhere and fit their own electronics.
I already explained there are only three possible settings. Soft, medium and hard and explained how it feels with my alto saxophone. Comparison with the resistance of some other instruments is irrelevant.
If you can`t understand a simple setting like soft, medium, and hard, please, contact with the Emeo Team. www.emeomusic.com
I think the comparison with the soft,medium, and hard reed is very understandable.
The Emeo feels like soprano in the left hand and alto in the right hand. The key mechanism is very comfortable. The Emeo is a handmade instrument and the names of the technical experts and engineers are available on the website.. I didn't ask about how exactly they have made the Emeo. This information isn't available on their website neither.
The instrument maker is very talented, his name is Eddie Gofman. I love his G&A mouthpieces too.
You can contact him and ask for further details.
 

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Thanks for the links! I've read the manual and watched the instructional video, and I still have a few questions:
  1. At about 4:10 in your video, you tell the viewer to listen to your playing for the possibilities with regard to articulation, vibrato, and dynamics. However, I couldn't hear any modulation of the vibrato in your demo, nor could I find any reference to a mechanism for online control of vibrato in the manual or instruction video. Is there a method to control vibrato that is missing from the instructions?
  2. The instruction video and manual indicate that you have to press both RH spatula keys to enter "command" mode. When playing passages that involve transitions between these two notes (e.g., C minor arpeggios), have you ever had a problem with accidentally triggering/entering command mode?
  3. The instruction video and manual indicate that the Emeo does not retain your key, range, or air resistance settings across a power cycle (i.e., they reset to the key of C, the "standard" range, and the "soft" resistance setting, respectively). Have you found this to be an inconvenience?
  4. The specs and manual page includes an altissimo fingering chart, and the fingering chart introduces the listed fingerings as "the most popular options for each of the altissimo notes". Does this mean that there are additional altissimo fingerings that are not listed? Alternatively, is it possible to specify your own key mappings, as with the YDS-150? (I'm asking because some of my preferred altissimo fingerings, like the most common A3 fingering, are not included in this list)
I'd appreciate any additional information you could provide regarding these questions.
I don't understand this response. Of course it won't respond acoustically like a saxophone does. If you read my post that you quoted, you'll see that I said the purpose of it is to practice saxophone technique not embouchure or breath support or whatever. The point (again, according to the people who invented the thing) is to make the keys feel as much like saxophone keys as possible.

To the extent I'm interested in it, it's for exactly that reason. It would be great to have a saxophone in my office at work, for example, that I could practice during down time. I don't need something that responds like a saxophone, just something that allows me to work on scales, patterns, etc. and for that purpose, I want something that feels as much like as saxophone in the hands as possible. I can work on tone and breath support on a real saxophone when I'm in my practice room at home.
1. No problem. In my upcoming video I will show the dynamic response without any music and I will choose a different sound for the demonstration.
To better understand the effects or control of dynamic response, you need to search for the Respiro manual.
2. No, because as you can read in the manual, you press the key C and Eb together, and blow through the instrument, then you press various combinations of keys on the instrument, depending on what you want to do (Change key, change resistance, switch off..)
It's actually very easy. The Emeo team has a perfect explanation of the command mode in its instructional video
3.No. In the cockpit, I must set up and verify the flight instruments. I have no problem to do the same check with the Emeo. It takes me a few seconds to set up my key and resistance
4..I found the altissimo chart very interesting. Some combinations were new to me. The altissimo can vary from one instrument to another, and I use on my alto saxophone primarily the altissimo recommended by Gerald Albright. I still want to take a little time to try all the options listed on the Emeo's altissimo chart with my alto sax and the Emeo.
As for the additional fingerings, I can consult your question with the Emeo team. I also want to know about the possibility of adding multi-phonics and overtones.
I believe that they will continue to update the Emeo as they made it for the saxophonists
 

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The Emeo concept doesn't make much sense to me.

The mechanics on a saxophone are defined by where tone holes are plus all the complications of arms and springs that bring control of the pad cups to our hands. There are lots of unevenness of comfort and feel on a sax keywork across the full range. EWIs on the other hand have the benefit of a more comfortable/even keyboard while still keeping the keys in a similar location for familiarity to sax players, but they can hardly emulate all subtleties of how a wind player can make notes sound on a real saxophone.

The Emeo combines the worst of both worlds IMO: it duplicates all the mechanical awkwardness of a real sax with the electronic sound limitations. And to finish it off, it is one of the most expensive EWIs in the market.

Other EWIs like the Aerophone AE-30 or even the Yamaha YDS-150 at least try to provide a more comfortable and even keyboard.
I don't understand this response. Of course it won't respond acoustically like a saxophone does. If you read my post that you quoted, you'll see that I said the purpose of it is to practice saxophone technique not embouchure or breath support or whatever. The point (again, according to the people who invented the thing) is to make the keys feel as much like saxophone keys as possible.

To the extent I'm interested in it, it's for exactly that reason. It would be great to have a saxophone in my office at work, for example, that I could practice during down time. I don't need something that responds like a saxophone, just something that allows me to work on scales, patterns, etc. and for that purpose, I want something that feels as much like as saxophone in the hands as possible. I can work on tone and breath support on a real saxophone when I'm in my practice room at home.
The Emeo concept doesn't make much sense to me.

The mechanics on a saxophone are defined by where tone holes are plus all the complications of arms and springs that bring control of the pad cups to our hands. There are lots of unevenness of comfort and feel on a sax keywork across the full range. EWIs on the other hand have the benefit of a more comfortable/even keyboard while still keeping the keys in a similar location for familiarity to sax players, but they can hardly emulate all subtleties of how a wind player can make notes sound on a real saxophone.

The Emeo combines the worst of both worlds IMO: it duplicates all the mechanical awkwardness of a real sax with the electronic sound limitations. And to finish it off, it is one of the most expensive EWIs in the market.

Other EWIs like the Aerophone AE-30 or even the Yamaha YDS-150 at least try to provide a more comfortable and even keyboard.
I don't understand this response. Of course it won't respond acoustically like a saxophone does. If you read my post that you quoted, you'll see that I said the purpose of it is to practice saxophone technique not embouchure or breath support or whatever. The point (again, according to the people who invented the thing) is to make the keys feel as much like saxophone keys as possible.

To the extent I'm interested in it, it's for exactly that reason. It would be great to have a saxophone in my office at work, for example, that I could practice during down time. I don't need something that responds like a saxophone, just something that allows me to work on scales, patterns, etc. and for that purpose, I want something that feels as much like as saxophone in the hands as possible. I can work on tone and breath support on a real saxophone when I'm in my practice room at home.
GreatGreat point Michael.
I don't understand this response. Of course it won't respond acoustically like a saxophone does. If you read my post that you quoted, you'll see that I said the purpose of it is to practice saxophone technique not embouchure or breath support or whatever. The point (again, according to the people who invented the thing) is to make the keys feel as much like saxophone keys as possible.

To the extent I'm interested in it, it's for exactly that reason. It would be great to have a saxophone in my office at work, for example, that I could practice during down time. I don't need something that responds like a saxophone, just something that allows me to work on scales, patterns, etc. and for that purpose, I want something that feels as much like as saxophone in the hands as possible. I can work on tone and breath support on a real saxophone when I'm in my practice room at home.
Thank you for answering my questions. I look forward to your follow-up video!
You are very welcome Michael.
Let me know if you have any other questions or suggestions for my upcoming video.
I will be glad to help. You can find me on my social media as well, Instagram: @felicitysaxophonist.
In this forum you will read bunch of nonsense from the people who didn't have any experience with the Emeo , so they can only negatively speculate.
Contact directly with the Emeo Team. Here is the Instagram link : Login • Instagram
They are an excellent team of experts. Also very helpful, very kind people and they are musicians as well.
I have received a lot of support from them.
I have a similar experience with the manufacturer of my hand made Free Wind alto saxophone by Amsterdam Winds. Friso Heindinga, was always extremely helpful , whenever I needed a help and always impeccable when repairing my saxophone. Both instruments are not cheap, but the quality is superior. And the experience is superior too.
 

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I call this marketing blurb. This device will never acoustically respond like a real sax does. It may feel like a sax on the fingers but it won't respond like one. It makes no sense to me to duplicate springs and the full mechanism when the response on the Emeo is digital. This device will never mimic the actual experience of playing a sax where every minute key movement matters on what sound you will produce. What Yamaha did by reproducing the key shapes and tying them directly to digital buttons in the simplest form makes much more sense for the "practice" goal you described.
It actually responds perfectly like the traditional saxophone. If you would watch my entire video, you would see that I made an example, playing with Bob Mintzer's saxophone solo in a very fast tempo. If there were a problem with the key mechanism or how the EMEO responds, I wouldn't be able to do it. In my next video I can play Giant Steps in fast tempo, so there's no question about it.
I actually had a problem with the EWI Akai 5000, not responding correctly , especially when my hands were cold. Plus, it was constantly switching off and I had to send it back for a repair 4 times during one year.
It was so frustrating that I even didn't sell it, but gave it away , basically brand new.
The Emeo is my best experience with the wind controller.
 

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Playing fast covers up the issue. Play slow argeggios or sequences of large intervals (not octaves) without articulation to show whether this sensitivity is an issue. Is was one of the things that I did not like with my WX7. I hear the glitches in your example of playing without a mouthpiece.
I did that for the first time right in front the camera and wasn't familiar with playing without blowing. I also didn't adjust latency , that's why it sounds less precise. I actually didn't want to add that part to my video, because I wasn't happy with that example. Here is one of my favorite saxophone players , Rosario Giuliani playing the EMEO
 

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That's interesting. I worry less about the fast tempos, where the keys do close very fast, transitions will be imperceptible. I'd think it's at slow tempos where these differences will show. But you speak from experience. I can't question that. I hope someday I'll run into one and will be able to try it myself.
The EMEO will responds exactly as the conventional saxophone. If for example, your fingers are slow , or you don't play very precisely in some difficult exercise, maybe not closing the keys enough, you will hear it on the Emeo. It actually helps to improve your technique.
Switching from the EMEO to my alto saxophone is very easy , and I feel, I am not creating any bad habits, because the EMEO doesn't have any slides , buttons, no mouthpiece biting.
The design and the purpose of the EMEO is very clean and simple. I would like to make another video , where I can show more about the dynamic response, make some technical demonstration and also show more information about the ImoxPlus Respiro and the sophisticated sounds it has available.
By the way, here is the YouTube channel of the EMEO . They have some great musicians playing the EMEO https://youtube.com/channel/UCRGQ82hLsj-N0lkTckHTNhg
 

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I think this is an example of a "the perfect is the enemy of the good" critique. The Emeo doesn't have to be a 100 percent authentic simulation of a saxophone to be a useful tool.

Yamaha's Silent Brass device is popular because it's cheap and easy to use. They didn't have to simulate the mechanics of a trumpet. Just shove the electronic mute into your own, real trumpet, and you're ready to play, silently. But as we all know, a saxophone cannot be muted in that fashion, and the sax mutes that do exist are generally clumsy and awkward -- ungainly suitcases built to hold your whole sax while you try to play it inside.

So, as I mentioned in post way upstream, while the Emeo may be overkill for rare or occasional silent practicing, if you find yourself in frequent need of something that feels like a real saxophone under your fingers, but is still quiet, this instrument could be the answer. I try to imagine what I might do if I had band rehearsal once a week, and had a full-time job (and thus very limited opportunities to squeeze in practice sessions), but resided in a place where I absolutely could not play a normal saxophone because of the sonic impact on other people. Would I just never practice? Or would I try to find a compromise that felt as much like a sax as possible, while ensuring that no one would be disturbed?
Actually this is a very good topic! Well said.
I want to share with you in my next video the example of the flight simulator and how aviation has progressed through flight simulation. And make a comparison with the practice tool like the EMEO.
In the aviation high risks and high costs are involved, so the flight simulation has a longer history, and is well accepted by the pilots. You will never hear a pilot to say it's a stupid video game.
Meanwhile, in the music, you could have a delirious conversation about the use of the practice instrument like the EMEO.
"Expensive toy ", " it will never replace the saxophone " is the primary opinion of the people who doesn't want to understand the point of the practice instrument.
The flight simulator is designed to be as realistic as possible to the real aircraft, yet the motion must be simulate.
They have been disastrous accidents due to inappropriate flight training in the simulator. (When the simulator wasn't corresponding to the real aircraft)
That's why I like the idea that EMEO doesn't have any unnecessary features, slides, buttons ➡ No bad habit forming
The EMEO team has made a great decision when not replicating the saxophone sound (no ugly saxophone samples in the library. Can we applaud that? ??) And made the EMEO as a practice horn.
Although, if you are a creative musician, you have got not only a practice instrument, but a very cool MIDI wind controller with a very cool software like the ImoxPlus Respiro.
 
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