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Interesting. It doesn’t seem possible to do much tonguing. At least all the examples are very legato.
 

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It comes all down to price and to the possibility to evolve the software and sounds.

and frankly speaking the " saxophone" range video shows how a pale imitation of the sax this gives when , towards the end of the video the quartet take the real saxophones and plays against the EMEO.


Now compare this to the Synthophone , if the price of the Emeo would be very much lower and if the software would be at least as good, then it has a chance.

 

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Commercial posting - affiliate/shill video removed
I have done a review about the Emeo.
The Emeo is designed to be a practice horn. It wasn't designed to be a performance instrument or replacement of the traditional saxophone. I doesn't have onboard sounds , but it comes with a very innovative software Respiro designed for the wind controllers. You can easily play staccato, it has a dynamic response. I explained this part in my video.
Also the sound library is very cool. The Respiro offers a variety of rich sounds, some of them are very unique or experimental. The Emeo team didn't include many saxophone sounds on purpose. I believe it's a decision of good taste. I personally don't like saxophone samples. I am very happy with the Emeo and I am planning to make more videos showing all the things I can practice with it. So far it was my best experience with the MIDI wind controllers.
 

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The Emeo is designed to be a practice horn. It wasn't designed to be a performance instrument or replacement of the traditional saxophone.
By happenstance, I just saw your video yesterday. I think the Emeo does have some genuine utility as a highly portable, silent practice instrument that still feels like a saxophone. However, considering its relatively high price, and the normal versatility that comes with any device that is software-controlled, I think it's inevitable that Emeo purchasers will want to experiment with the instrument in a performance setting. The company should expect that, and do what it can to support such players; that probably includes providing a good selection of realistic saxophone sounds.
 

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By happenstance, I just saw your video yesterday. I think the Emeo does have some genuine utility as a highly portable, silent practice instrument that still feels like a saxophone. However, considering its relatively high price, and the normal versatility that comes with any device that is software-controlled, I think it's inevitable that Emeo purchasers will want to experiment with the instrument in a performance setting. The company should expect that, and do what it can to support such players; that probably includes providing a good selection of realistic saxophone sounds.
I agree that people will probably use it for midi input and other non-practice uses, but it's clearly marketed as a "practice saxophone" so I don't think the manufacturers have any responsibility to explicitly support performance modes (though they already do, by making it midi-capable for example).

I also agree with @Felicitysax that any saxophone sounds are going to be disappointing for a real saxophone player. Moreover, very few performers that use EWI devices meant for performance actually perform using saxophone sounds, so I don't think that the Emeo manufacturers are giving up on some large segment of the market as a result of the omission of saxophone sounds.

Personally, the biggest knock against it that I see, in terms of its stated purpose as a portable, use-anywhere practice saxophone, is that it requires external devices and software. Its closest competitor, the YDS-150 (which is also advertised primarily as a practice saxophone), does not require any external devices or software for its use (i.e., you can just plug headphones directly into the device to practice silently), which makes it much more "portable" IMO.
 

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I agree that people will probably use it for midi input and other non-practice uses, but it's clearly marketed as a "practice saxophone" so I don't think the manufacturers have any responsibility to explicitly support performance modes (though they already do, by making it midi-capable for example).
The Emeo people can either be customer-friendly to the greatest extent possible, or they can rely on a "not in the user manual!" strategy. Their choice. The video in post #3 above indicates what players started doing with the product immediately upon release.

Personally, the biggest knock against it that I see, in terms of its stated purpose as a portable, use-anywhere practice saxophone, is that it requires external devices and software. Its closest competitor, the YDS-150 (which is also advertised primarily as a practice saxophone), does not require any external devices or software for its use (i.e., you can just plug headphones directly into the device to practice silently), which makes it much more "portable" IMO.
The Yamaha also costs about half as much as the Emeo. The ergonomics of the Emeo are more realistic, but will that matter for a nonperformance device?
 

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The Emeo people can either be customer-friendly to the greatest extent possible, or they can rely on a "not in the user manual!" strategy. Their choice. The video in post #3 above indicates what players started doing with the product immediately upon release.
I'm not really sure what you mean by this. The Emeo video in post #3 shows members of the Emeo development team using the Emeo to practice saxophone quartet music. This is not a performance (it's a demo by the manufacturers/developers) and it was filmed long before the product was released.

The Yamaha also costs about half as much as the Emeo. The ergonomics of the Emeo are more realistic, but will that matter for a nonperformance device?
I agree with you regarding the first sentence (which is why this is a problem for the Emeo). Regarding your question however, I think that realistic ergonomics are especially important for a practice device (as opposed to a performance device). Many saxophonists who play EWIs in professional performances (e.g., Michael Brecker, Seamus Blake, Dayna Stephens) use EWIs that have ergonomics that are nothing like those of a saxophone. For them, it's essentially like playing/performing on a different instrument (e.g., like a saxophonist performing on flute).

However, if the entire point of the device is to allow you to practice saxophone technique, then it's obviously important that the device feel like a real saxophone.
 

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I'm not really sure what you mean by this. The Emeo video in post #3 shows members of the Emeo development team using the Emeo to practice saxophone quartet music. This is not a performance (it's a demo by the manufacturers/developers) and it was filmed long before the product was released.
Oh, OK. I misinterpreted the video. I still think players who buy an Emeo will try to incorporate it into their performances, but obviously that video is not evidence of such usage.

I agree with you regarding the first sentence (which is why this is a problem for the Emeo). Regarding your question however, I think that realistic ergonomics are especially important for a practice device (as opposed to a performance device). Many saxophonists who play EWIs in professional performances (e.g., Michael Brecker, Seamus Blake, Dayna Stephens) use EWIs that have ergonomics that are nothing like those of a saxophone. For them, it's essentially like playing/performing on a different instrument (e.g., like a saxophonist performing on flute).

However, if the entire point of the device is to allow you to practice saxophone technique, then it's obviously important that the device feel like a real saxophone.
I guess it depends on how much reliance will be placed on the silent device in place of a real saxophone. If I were expecting to do most, or a major part, of my practicing on an electronic substitute, I might be willing to pay twice as much just to get authentic metal saxophone key work. But if the device were just for very occasional silent warmups in a hotel room or the like, and I relied primarily on a real sax for woodshedding, the feel of the YDS-150 might be close enough.
 

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I guess it depends on how much reliance will be placed on the silent device in place of a real saxophone. If I were expecting to do most, or a major part, of my practicing on an electronic substitute, I might be willing to pay twice as much just to get authentic metal saxophone key work. But if the device were just for very occasional silent warmups in a hotel room or the like, and I relied primarily on a real sax for woodshedding, the feel of the YDS-150 might be close enough.
I agree completely with this. Furthermore, I suspect that the intersection of saxophone players who (1) are willing and able to pay twice as much for the Emeo for its more authentic feel, and (2) don't have access to practice space is pretty small. This is why I worry about the future of the Emeo, even though I really like the concept.

The Synthophone that @milandro linked to in post #3 was developed around a similar concept, but it was even more expensive (around $3000 in 2004) and remained a pretty niche instrument as a result (I can't find evidence for more than about a dozen Synthophone players).

Incidentally, another significant disadvantage that diminishes the Emeo's suitability for live performance is that, unlike the Synthophone, the YDS-150, or many other EWIs, it provides no onboard method at all for bending pitches (many EWIs have a bite sensor, while the YDS-150 has a thumb-controlled "analog controller").
 

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They have some selection of the saxophone sounds, but in the manual you can read this: "Note that we did not put a saxophone sound in the collection - we did this on purpose, to emphasize that we are not trying to make the Emeo sound like a conventional saxophone."
 

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You can use the Emeo for the performance playing as well. I am not sure if you could watch my video, but I actually talked about it. Anyway, I will soon make another video where I will show again the potential of the Emeo. Seems to me that people still don't understand what they could do with the Emeo and how useful instrument it actually is.
 

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I agree completely with this. Furthermore, I suspect that the intersection of saxophone players who (1) are willing and able to pay twice as much for the Emeo for its more authentic feel, and (2) don't have access to practice space is pretty small. This is why I worry about the future of the Emeo, even though I really like the concept.

The Synthophone that @milandro linked to in post #3 was developed around a similar concept, but it was even more expensive (around $3000 in 2004) and remained a pretty niche instrument as a result (I can't find evidence for more than about a dozen Synthophone players).

Incidentally, another significant disadvantage that diminishes the Emeo's suitability for live performance is that, unlike the Synthophone, the YDS-150, or many other EWIs, it provides no onboard method at all for bending pitches (many EWIs have a bite sensor, while the YDS-150 has a thumb-controlled "analog controller").
I could talk to the Emeo team and they are not interested in producing on a massive scale. So I wouldn't worry about their future. I'm sure some people will be interested in getting the Emeo.
If you could see my video, I play a hand made alto saxophone by Amsterdam Winds. This is an expensive but magical instrument. And here is the same situation, the company is also not interested to produce on a large scale, but to create something unique. I'm actually really interested in seeing the future of the Emeo. The people who built this practice instrument are highly intelligent, technical experts and musicians. For those who doesn't know, The Emeo is made in Israel, in one of the most innovative countries in the technology.
Now, when it goes to practice space, I live in the house isolated by the nature in Norway. I can play as a wish, but I like the idea to play outside after the Covid is over (always at home is tiring) or just enjoy my day and practice in the late afternoon with the Emeo. It's not only about a silent practice. The Respiro included with the Emeo is a very innovative software too! It's a very interesting tool for music production and for the performance playing too. By the way, I prefer not to have onboard sounds. I can apply any changes by one click, adjust all effects and modify the sounds as I wish.
 

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I think with all these devices folks continually want it to be something that it just can’t be.
There are performance EWIs, and that is their role, not to be an electronic sax, but something in its own right.
There are practice tools that are closer in to saxes via keyword designs, that, if creative, can be used as performance for sure, but do not come close to replicating a sax.
It is a lofty goal to duplicate sax electronically and allow for all the expression and nuance, but the closer you get, with ergos the same, the more costly it becomes.
You could combine all the best features of all the options and you still wouldn’t have a reasonably priced electronic sax, and I doubt any of us will ever see one in our lifetime.
At the higher price points, I would rather just buy another sax.
 

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Guys, no offense, but since I have posted my video, I have received lots of messages from people with no background in science, engineering or at least some interest in innovative technology. People who doubt about the Emeo and doubt about the Emeo´s future. (Because this is the internet, and they know everything about the instrument they have never tried, right?)
Meanwhile, I am enjoying a new reality as a saxophonist. The digital practice horn, which makes me save time, money, easy to take anywhere. In Norway Spring is here, temperatures are rising and I can't wait to sit down with my Emeo in our garden, watching birds and playing.
If 1550$ is too expensive for you, well let me say, there are girls going wild for the designer´s bags and shoes paying double, even triple price of the Emeo. Some people also want a quality, instead of some kind plastic piece of instrument. (no offense)
You said, at the higher price you would rather buy another saxophone. And what's the point to get another loud saxophone ? Where is the progress or solution?

 

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I think with all these devices folks continually want it to be something that it just can't be.
There are performance EWIs, and that is their role, not to be an electronic sax, but something in its own right.
There are practice tools that are closer in to saxes via keyword designs, that, if creative, can be used as performance for sure, but do not come close to replicating a sax.
It is a lofty goal to duplicate sax electronically and allow for all the expression and nuance, but the closer you get, with ergos the same, the more costly it becomes.
You could combine all the best features of all the options and you still wouldn't have a reasonably priced electronic sax, and I doubt any of us will ever see one in our lifetime.
At the higher price points, I would rather just buy another sax.
Guys, no offense, but since I have posted my video, I have received lots of messages from people with no background in science, engineering or at least some interest in innovative technology. People who doubt about the Emeo and doubt about the Emeo´s future. (Because this is the internet, and they know everything about the instrument they have never tried, right?)
Meanwhile, I am enjoying a new reality as a saxophonist. The digital practice horn, which makes me save time, money, easy to take anywhere. In Norway Spring is here, temperatures are rising and I can't wait to sit down with my Emeo in our garden, watching birds and playing (silently!)
If 1550$ is too expensive for you, well let me say, there are girls going wild for the designer bags and shoes paying double, even triple price of the Emeo. Some people also want a quality, instead of some kind plastic piece of instrument. (no offense)
You said, at the higher price you would rather buy another saxophone. And what's the point to get another loud saxophone ? Where is the progress or the solution?
 

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I have done a review about the Emeo. The Emeo is designed to be a practice horn. It wasn't designed to be a performance instrument or replacement of the traditional saxophone...
Is it a review or a commercial?

You can use the Emeo for the performance playing as well. I am not sure if you could watch my video, but I actually talked about it. Anyway, I will soon make another video where I will show again the potential of the Emeo. Seems to me that people still don't understand what they could do with the Emeo and how useful instrument it actually is.
Well, is it a practice instrument or a performance instrument? If you are to be the company spokesperson, make a consistent message.

I could talk to the Emeo team and they are not interested in producing on a massive scale. So I wouldn't worry about their future.
Then perhaps you don't need to press their product to a saxophone forum that you previously had no interest in.

I'm sure some people will be interested in getting the Emeo.
If you could see my video, I play a hand made alto saxophone by Amsterdam Winds. This is an expensive but magical instrument. And here is the same situation, the company is also not interested to produce on a large scale, but to create something unique. I'm actually really interested in seeing the future of the Emeo. The people who built this practice instrument are highly intelligent, technical experts and musicians. For those who doesn't know, The Emeo is made in Israel, in one of the most innovative countries in the technology.
Why should the country of origin matter? And if it does, what is the heritage and tradition of the saxophone in Israel?

Now, when it goes to practice space, I live in the house isolated by the nature in Norway. I can play as a wish, but I like the idea to play outside after the Covid is over (always at home is tiring) or just enjoy my day and practice in the late afternoon with the Emeo. It's not only about a silent practice. The Respiro included with the Emeo is a very innovative software too! It's a very interesting tool for music production and for the performance playing too.
Again, I suggest you make your message consistent.

Guys, no offense, but since I have posted my video, I have received lots of messages from people with no background in science, engineering or at least some interest in innovative technology.
FWIW, I have background in science, engineering, and innovation. I applaud Emeo's creation, but question some of their decisions. True, I have not played it, but I would observe a couple of opportunities that are evident right away. Given the price of necks that don't require high precision in their internal geometry, I suggest incorporating an alto sax neck and dropping the straight-neck interface. An oversized sop that weighs more than a real horn is not going to have the correct angles to mimic good practice ergonomics. I also suggest that they find a way to adjust the air flow resistance. This instrument looks like it has a very small port, similar to the Yamaha devices, and that back pressure is one of the downsides to me of playing instruments like these.

Meanwhile, I am enjoying a new reality as a saxophonist. The digital practice horn, which makes me save time, money, easy to take anywhere. In Norway Spring is here, temperatures are rising and I can't wait to sit down with my Emeo in our garden, watching birds and playing (silently!)
If 1550$ is too expensive for you, well let me say, there are girls going wild for the designer bags and shoes paying double, even triple price of the Emeo. Some people also want a quality, instead of some kind plastic piece of instrument. (no offense)
You said, at the higher price you would rather buy another saxophone. And what's the point to get another loud saxophone ? Where is the progress or the solution?
Consider your messaging. Are you trying to target musicians or girls buying pretty playthings? This is offensive (no offense).

P.S. I see from a very brief web search that you seem to sell yourself as a saxophone influencer. I wish that women could represent a product without displaying themselves in such makeup and clothing (no offense).

 
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