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Turns out the British expression "Put a sock in it" is not merely a put-down spiced with a colorful mental image... it really works. A pair of really cushy gym socks, rolled up, mutes the C-Mel well enough to bring relief to my suffering family when I practice... as long as I don't try to play low B, which the sock grievously maims, or low Bb, which the sock totally kills.
 

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well, yes, socks towels, or more traditional rings (wood or metaL) to mute your saxophone will affect , somehow the lower note (and make the lowest impossible), but the saxophone like most woodwinds produces sound from every open tonehole (the bell is the last tonehole) so this wouldn't help all that much. Of course on a C mel your options are somewhat limited and you don't have the clumsy but effective external mute



You could try to use this other one ( here also audio files) http://www.bill-lewington.com/saxmute.htm which also puts sound absorbing sponges in the bell but also in the mouthpiece and neck




 

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Alternatively, just fit the original mouthpiece for a quiet, stuffy, muffled sound.
Have a blast with your modern tenor piece when the wife & kids are out....if only to remind you how a saxophone should sound. :bluewink:
 

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Since I am building a new shed and try to make it soundproof I hope I won't need those. But just in case it turns out that too much noise is leaking, I follow these things with renewed interest. I listened to the saxmute but apart from the fact you can hear the guy struggling I don't hear a significant sound reduction in the tenor clip.
And this Esax thing... looks awful heavy and clumsy to actually play in. Maybe you can get used to it but for tenor ? That thing is gonna be large.serious doubts...
 

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For the tenor and for the alto there is a metal support or cradle where you place the heavy frame. Besides producing the lower notes is not easy with these mutes although the latest models of the Chinese one have a gizmo in the bell which makes the lower notes easier. I own an alto model and use a golf ball in the bell which works fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
well, yes, socks towels, or more traditional rings (wood or metaL) to mute your saxophone will affect , somehow the lower note (and make the lowest impossible), but the saxophone like most woodwinds produces sound from every open tonehole (the bell is the last tonehole) so this wouldn't help all that much.



Of course on a C mel your options are somewhat limited and you don't have the clumsy but effective external mute
Well, sound comes out in all directions, not just through the first open tonehole. Some comes out through the bell, and the socks absorb it. The socks are not acting as sound-proofing – that is, as a barrier that prevents sound from crossing it. They are true sound absorbers, turning the sound energy into friction as the sock fibers rub against one another. So it mutes the lowest notes the most, but it tends to mute everything a bit, take some of the edge off.

Now, I love the look of the sax-blimp. It looks like you're blowing on an underage storm trooper. (But let's not dwell on that image too long, it can't lead anywhere good.) But I can't see actually using such a silly thing.
 

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Since I am building a new shed and try to make it soundproof I hope I won't need those. But just in case it turns out that too much noise is leaking, I follow these things with renewed interest. I listened to the saxmute but apart from the fact you can hear the guy struggling I don't hear a significant sound reduction in the tenor clip.
And this Esax thing... looks awful heavy and clumsy to actually play in. Maybe you can get used to it but for tenor ? That thing is gonna be large.serious doubts...
Me neither. You could hear a difference, but not enough to warrent the use of such a device.
You get as much muting just playing into a closet full of clothing hanging up.
 

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don't forget , when you use this mute, that you can and indeed should use the headphones. Since you can't hear yourself well you will play much louder to hear yourself and then complain it is too loud. Use the earphones and you will see that you can play quite a bit more quietly.
 

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I said that sound was being irradiated from EVERY open tonehole (not only the last one) and I said that the bell is the last tonehole of a saxophone . I didn't say it will only come out from the last tonehole.

The benefit of any muting system involving only the bell are very marginal and the sound problems it creates are huge........ but to each his own.
 

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For alto, I think the "blimp" worked pretty well. In Frankfurt I tested it and found it to be a pretty good alternative.
 

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Alternatively....you could always play quietly while your wife is around.
Use the opportunity to play subtone.
 

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don't forget , when you use this mute, that you can and indeed should use the headphones. Since you can't hear yourself well you will play much louder to hear yourself and then complain it is too loud. Use the earphones and you will see that you can play quite a bit more quietly.
Ah, now I understand - and if you're hard of hearing, replace the headphones with a jack-to-jack cable plugged into a stonking great amplifier ? [rolleyes]

But seriously, if I've ever needed to keep the sound down, I just loosely crumple a (e.g.) cleaning cloth in the bell, and practise playing quietly... It's something we can do, often enjoyably, when guitarists aren't around. We so get used to 'giving it welly', that we often forget there is a very much gentler side to our horns. As Cap'n Beeflat rightly says "practise subtoning", see just how quietly you can produce a full, expressive sound. Harmonics at 'ppp' :whistle:
 

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My wife just had pioneering surgery: Voluntary Deafness. The health provider heard my jokes and playing and immediately covered it.
 
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