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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #1
About a year or two ago, I went on exploration of saxophones. While I dabbled with sopranos, altos, a bari and even a sopranino, I think the tenor trip is the most interesting story. I had been playing a Yamaha YTS 62 II for 4 years and really liked that horn. I never felt it was lacking much that didn't come from me, the player, from the start. While I still had that, I bought a silver Series III from a SOTWber in terrific shape. Big wow moment happened when I first played the III. I started thinking that I really need to check out as many horns as I can to know for myself what, if anything, I was missing.

So off I went and I traded my Yamaha for a Buffet Dynaction. I really did love the lush dark sound, but the keywork was better suited for bigger hands. So I bought a Super Dynaction and then sold the Dynaction. The SDA fit my hands much better. Then, I got great deal on a near new JK SX90R black nickel. That sax had a very ballzy tone, but the keywork felt awkward to me. Just could get use to it. So ebay and bye by with it. Then, a SML rev D practically fell in my lap for just $500. It needed some TLC so I had it repadded and was very happy with result.

Jump ahead... I needed some cash so I had to choose between the SDA and the SML. I could of been happy keeping either one, but since someone expressed interest in the SDA first, off it went to Georgia.

So now I'm back to just two tenors and to be honest, the Series III is still king. While I do like my SML, I’m now thinking of trading back to a modern horn like my old Yamaha for the modern feel. I miss the light keywork of that horn.

Since this time has passed my tone is sooooo muuuch better than it was. Practice does mean something. I guess the lesson I've learned is to stop thinking and start playing whatever horn is in my hand. A good bit of advise for all.
 

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tjontheroad said:
While I do like my SML, I';m now thinking of trading back to a modern horn like my old Yamaha for the modern feel. I miss the light keywork of that horn.
Tim, if I may suggest, try a Yanagisawa, also the entry model T901: that's the one I have and has all the good qualities of the Yamaha (including the most comfortable keywork) and the sound of a Selmer.
I have owned in the past a YTS62II and an 82Z which I did not like nearly as much as this 901. Just my opinion, of course, but since you like your serie III (which I own and cherish too) I think you'll be very happy with a Yani.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #3
Woops, I forgot the pre-Jubulee black nickel Borgani. Ugliest horn I ever seen. It looked like a tank! Played like a killer piece of iron though. Bought that for a bar blues band gig that died out in a few weeks. Too bad, it would have looked cool with beer cans hanging on it :)
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
rispoli said:
Tim, if I may suggest, try a Yanagisawa, also the entry model T901: that's the one I have and has all the good qualities of the Yamaha (including the most comfortable keywork) and the sound of a Selmer.
I have owned in the past a YTS62II and an 82Z which I did not like nearly as much as this 901. Just my opinion, of course, but since you like your serie III (which I own and cherish too) I think you'll be very happy with a Yani.
Yeah, the SC-992 I have is on my burry me with it list. So I'm a fan of Yanis, I've never tried a tenor though. It's on my to try out sheet. I might get up to USA horn next month and have a look around.
 

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TJ: Is the horn in your avatar a 10M? Is or was it yours? :D
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #6
brasscane said:
TJ: Is the horn in your avatar a 10M? Is or was it yours? :D
It's a 1935 6M metro and it's still mine. Got it for just $600 fully repadded. That and my SDA sparkie are my keeper altos. I'm very happy with those.
 

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I'll second the T901. I've added a bronze neck to mine and the keywork is to die for.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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TJ - Interesting that you have a Serie III like your mentor, Tim Price. Does he not also play a Borgani tenor? Have you tried it yet? I think it would be an excellent complement to the III. I'd still be playing my III had I not gone through some RSI issues at the time. Light keywork with the tall palm keys of the III describes my Borg's setup.

You know I dig the SC-992 but I find the T-992 (hmmm, looking for a nice euphemism...) er, tame. ;)
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #10
Dr G said:
TJ - Interesting that you have a Serie III like your mentor, Tim Price. Does he not also play a Borgani tenor? Have you tried it yet? I think it would be an excellent complement to the III. I'd still be playing my III had I not gone through some RSI issues at the time. Light keywork with the tall palm keys of the III describes my Borg's setup.

You know I dig the SC-992 but I find the T-992 (hmmm, looking for a nice euphemism...) er, tame. ;)
The irony about me buying the SIII was I did it just before I started with Tim. I didn't know he played the exact same horn. It's a case of imitation by divine intervention. We had this moment when we stared both horns comparing the two. His is more custom to his tastes. Mine is pretty much stock. I've never tried his Borg. Would like to someday whenever I don't have so much stuff to practice and go over when I see him.
 

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Seems you already have a horn with modern key work. The III if it's set up and the spring tension is backed off will feel light enough.

I'd also keep the SML, but I would have kept the SDA tenor as well and went without food for a few months.

Personally I wouldn't buy a horn just because of the key work, tone is much more important. You can get used to just about anything within reason. Your III, SML and former SDA would kill the Yamaha in the tone department.

Are your hands freakishly small?
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #12
My hands are of about average size. Maybe a bit smaller than average. I can't pick up a basketball with one hand. The left hand stretch on the Dynaction from the index finger holding the B key and the pinky table while holding down the octave key was made for Wilt Chamberlain like hands. Plus, I busted my left wrist a couple years ago. It still gets sore sometimes if I stretch my hand apart for any lenght of time.

No doubt, tone rules. I just am starting feel now that I can get a good tone on whatever sax I play if work at it long enough. So why shouldn't I play one that fits my hands best?

I may yet still keep the SML if I can get it adjusted more to my current tastes.
 

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Yeah I fractured my wrist a couple of years ago as well. Luckily it didn't screw up my sax chops.

No doubt the Yamaha has a great feel to the key work. It's a well thought out and ergonomic design that most other makers should take a look at. The only part I don't like is Yamaha imo has a paper thin tone.

You'll find your hand/wrist and anything else that wiggles when you play the sax is going to get sore and hurt sometimes no matter what horn you play. The thing is to stay conscience of what your doing and do the least amount of work possible.
 

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Well Tim - I find myself going full circle, too -but in the opposite direction!

I've decided that the vintage horns fit my hands better. I blame that on my learning years playing a Bundy :shock: .

Currently on alto I'm loving the Rev D. I had cobbled out of 2 junkers. I am also really enjoying the Gretsch Commander I just picked up on eBay from Matt Stohrer.

What can I say, I still waffle between the modified 'French' sound and vintage American.

For tenor - Matt is re-building a Buescher Elkhart 30A (Aristocrat) over the next couple of weeks which I expect will satisfy my Vintage American side.

[tradebaitwarning] My other tenor is a B&S 2001 which satisfies my modified French tonality craving. There is one issue - it has the 'modern ergonomics' that don't quite suite me. The set up is great for small hands, very easy to reach table keys and a great design for the right hand.

Boy, I sure would like to try a Rev. D tenor, so much so that I'd be willing to part with my 2001. Is that a subtle hint? Feel free to eMail or pm if interested. [/tradebaitwarning]

Best of luck in your quest!
 

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tjontheroad said:
No doubt, tone rules. I just am starting feel now that I can get a good tone on whatever sax I play if work at it long enough. So why shouldn't I play one that fits my hands best?
This is so important to remember, above all.

It's what you put into it.

There's always some kind of adjustment to make - you make the adjustment
and then it's back to the end-goal which is making music.

None of the posters on this thread are going to sound alike on any one of the
tenors mentioned.

Everybody arrives at producing tone differently, but the idea is to get a sound;
that's the destination.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #16
JMac said:
Well Tim - I find myself going full circle, too -but in the opposite direction!

I've decided that the vintage horns fit my hands better. I blame that on my learning years playing a Bundy :shock: .

Currently on alto I'm loving the Rev D. I had cobbled out of 2 junkers. I am also really enjoying the Gretsch Commander I just picked up on eBay from Matt Stohrer.

What can I say, I still waffle between the modified 'French' sound and vintage American.

For tenor - Matt is re-building a Buescher Elkhart 30A (Aristocrat) over the next couple of weeks which I expect will satisfy my Vintage American side.

[tradebaitwarning] My other tenor is a B&S 2001 which satisfies my modified French tonality craving. There is one issue - it has the 'modern ergonomics' that don't quite suite me. The set up is great for small hands, very easy to reach table keys and a great design for the right hand.

Boy, I sure would like to try a Rev. D tenor, so much so that I'd be willing to part with my 2001. Is that a subtle hint? Feel free to eMail or pm if interested. [/tradebaitwarning]

Best of luck in your quest!

You're killin' me :D I'll send ya' a pm :bounce:
 

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rispoli said:
Tim, if I may suggest, try a Yanagisawa, also the entry model T901: that's the one I have and has all the good qualities of the Yamaha (including the most comfortable keywork) and the sound of a Selmer.
I have owned in the past a YTS62II and an 82Z which I did not like nearly as much as this 901. Just my opinion, of course, but since you like your serie III (which I own and cherish too) I think you'll be very happy with a Yani.
The Yanis are fairly underrated/underappreciated, I think.

Granted, we live in an age with a glut of products to choose from, both
vintage and modern, and virtually international access to them.

I'd like to try the T901, as I think it might be a little different design-wise from
the 880s.

I know my T902 is absolutely [and surprsingly]perfect for what I was looking
for, when I found myself journeying back to my start which was on a MKVI.

Didn't make it to the VI camp, as I stumbled into the Yani dojo.



The T901 is probably excellent as well.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #18
Tryptykon said:
This is so important to remember, above all.

It's what you put into it.

There's always some kind of adjustment to make - you make the adjustment
and then it's back to the end-goal which is making music.

None of the posters on this thread are going to sound alike on any one of the
tenors mentioned.

Everybody arrives at producing tone differently, but the idea is to get a sound;
that's the destination.
That is exactly what I'm try to say here. Although, I think it's the journey ;)
 

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tjontheroad said:
That is exactly what I'm try to say here. Although, I think it's the journey ;)
Yeah, I understood ya.

..and, that journey must be taken or you'll never stop thinking about embarking on it.

Knowledge is good.
 

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I absolutely love my SIII.

With that said, I wouldn't mind trying the Yanagisawa T9937.

If you're going to spend all that money, might as well try the best of the best.
 
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