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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I did a search first but did not give much, so I ask the opinon on here. What diffrences are there between the Yamaha 3C and the 4C mouthpieces for the Tenor Saxophone? I have a Yamaha 4C (Tenor) at the moment, and I am a beginner player. I have a Vento 900 Tenor Saxophone I use it on.
Usually I use RICO 1.5 or 2 reeds for the moment.

I also have an Alto Saxophone and have both of the Yamaha mouthpieces, a Yamaha 3C and 4C and for the most part I think, as a beginner, the Yamaha 3C alto is easer MP to play.
 

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I am am an adult beginner. From what I read on this forum and what my teacher told me, a 4C is the most frequently recommended mouthpiece for a beginner. The 4C is 0.067 inches (I believe. Check with the tenor mouthpiece facing charts on the internet). This is the gap between the tip of the mouthpiece and the tip of the reed. The 3C is smaller than the 4C. I started with the 4C and a 2.0 strength Rico Royal. Do not keep changing mouthpieces and reed strengths. Choose one mpc and one reed strength (4C and 2 reed, for example) and play that for a couple of months at least.

Even though the model name/numbers on the alto mpc are the same, the actual tip size on the alto mouthpiece is smaller for the same mouthpiece model. For example the tip size for a 4C alto mpc will be smaller than the tip size for a tenor 4C. I suggest that, at first, you learn to play only one (either tenor or alto) saxophone rather than switching frequently from one to the other.

If you do not have one, find a teacher and take lessons.

http://www.jodyjazz.com/facings.tenorsax.html
 

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In almost all cases, a higher number or higher letter means that the tip-opening increases as the number or letters go up. An asterisk added to the letter or number means a smaller increase (maybe half-way between a full number or letter).

In practical applications though, because of some variances found in some mouthpieces, the actual measurements may differ from what is commonly shown on charts. It isn't uncommon to find two mouthpieces from the same maker showing the same markings varying in playability - for you.

On the other hand, some makers come pretty darned close to making their mouthpieces so that each one plays the same. Still, one should probably test a piece before buying it and not rely on sight-unseen buying unless the buyer can afford the occasional disappointment.

As I continue to emphasize, we are all different and you may love a 3C while others love the 4C. It is not a test of embouchure building as much as it is how each one of us is built and what we want to hear from our instruments. DAVE
 

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To be honest I would'nt even bother considering a 3C for tenor. Yamaha plastic m/ps are good and consistent but 5C is a more sensible option on tenor IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The mouthpiece that came with the saxophone, a generic one, is rather wide open on the tip and it is a whole lot more difficult for me to play than the Yamaha 4C that my friend let me borrow. For a beginner I figurd closer spacing would be better, easier to develop some tone.
 

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Hard to compare apples to oranges (your generic-included mouthpiece with a Yamaha 4C). It could be that the Yamaha is a much better piece overall, thus it plays more easily than does the generic mouthpiece included with your saxophone. While we are all different in how we react to a certain mouthpiece, I've found that most "included mouthpieces" are not as good for me as were the ones I'd already been using OR were of a better-known brand. Yet many players get along just fine with whatever mouthpiece is included with a new horn.

Another factor that is involved in trying to make each mouthpiece play better is reed selection. Your 4C may take one brand-cut-strength reed better than another - and that reed won't necessarily be the best for your "included mouthpiece". The reed-matching thing takes time and money to sort out.

If you've found a piece that works better for you, best to stick with it until you develop your playing skills and embouchure training. I personally favor the more open tips (on soprano and alto, no tenor in my life anymore, but the principle is the same), but I can't transfer that approach to you. DAVE
 

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personaly i have the feeling, that the C3 is too close.....i would recommend them for beginner children rather....or somebody looking for some special....regarding your pics :) you have just turned from teenagerhood, so my opinion is go for the 4C. And after i while i would go for the 5CM...For me it was a big step up in terms of sound...of course i have read the oppsite (against the CM) as well.
Anyhow with agreement with the previous replies yamaha MP-s are perfect to help you to built up your skills and embouchure, than you will hunting for your own sound, and your own mp-s. But i have a lot of talented and ezxperienced friends who still playing on basic close Yamaha mp-s.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I picked up a Yamaha 3C from www.mouthpieceexpress.com and it plays very nice for me. I'm not sure how it would work out on others, but for my Tenor and experience it works very well with the Rico 1.5, Rico 2.0 and Rico Jazz 2soft that I have tried.

I even re-faced the cheap plastic MP that came with it and made it into a sweet player, now very easy to play. I re-surfaced the entire reed table to make the gap in the tip smaller, and then gave more length to the "lay" where the reed clears the railing and made it just a bit longer. I went off the Yamaha 3C as an example to copy. I also put in a piece of epoxy (wood-JB Weld) just down from the tip opening, not too much, and sanded down to give it a slightly raised baffle there. Went over the rails with crocus cloth polishing a bit when finished and it really plays sweet now. I tried it with the Rico Jazz reeds and it now plays very beautiful and has great projection with little effort to make tones, and or to bend them.
It was a cheap plastic MP sitting in the drawer and If I wanted to get rid of that "made" epoxy baffle in there I could in very little time. Seems to work well with it in there though. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Figured a $12.00 MP was fun to try some ideas on anyway.
 
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