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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Last month I bought a tenor SBA because I really love the sound of it. When I received it and after inspecting it, and I realized that the pads were very old, really hard and dry, however the horn plays nice and it seems not to have leaks.

Should I do a full overhaul ?, will the sound improve with brand new pads and after being serviced?

Thanks in advance.

Best,
 

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... will the sound improve with brand new pads and after being serviced?
Certainly it will improve if it needs work (and 'very old, hard pads' suggest it does), in sound quality and especially in its response and how well it plays.

However it may not need a full overhaul. What you should do is take it to a good tech and have it checked out. No way we can tell you on here exactly what it needs. One thing I can say is every time I've had my horn worked on, even for minor issues, it comes out playing better.
 

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However it may not need a full overhaul. What you should do is take it to a good tech and have it checked out. No way we can tell you on here exactly what it needs.
Pretty much what he said. If money and time are no object, you could just go ahead with a full repad/overhaul. (And some techs are more inclined that way than others.) Or you could have your tech do some adjustment and maybe replace a few pads. (Some techs are quite willing to do this, particularly if you give them a budget to work to.) Or you could just play it for a while longer to get a better feel/sense of the horn; then when you take it in you may have more focused/specific requests for the tech.
 

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It is always a good idea to take a recently purchased used saxophone to a reputable repair tech to have it checked out. A skilled technician can check not only for leaks but wear in the mechanisms, poor adjustment and regulation, faulty previous repairs, etc. An overhaul may not necessarily make your horn sound better if it there are no major leaks at the present time, but it will certainly add to the life of the instrument and its dependability over time. A place in California I can recommend is Horn Improvement at Bertrand's music.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone !!!

It seems that this horn has mixed pads, some brown and some black resonators, telling me that someone previously replaced some pads to make it last longer.

I may end up doing an overhaul, as mentioned above, I am sure the horn will come back a lot better.

Thanks again.

Best,
 

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Be careful who you send your horn out to for an overhaul Pablitus...I'm also in LA and I took my horn to one repairman recommended to me by someone on here,:twisted: and the guy totally messed up my horn, a King Super 20 tenor. There were all kinds of things wrong with the horn when I got it back, to many too mention on here.

I caught the guy lying several times about my horn, like he didn't wash the horn when he said he did, it still had the same vintage stench smell to it. He put back all the old corks and felts on the horn, and he said that they were all new felts, cork's, lol. I told him I wanted that ultra-suede material to make the action smooth, Anyway this guy was/is a real scumbag, charged me $900 and did a crappy job. He told me to come back to him and that the horn just needed to be tweaked! lol...If I would have went back to him, I would have ended up in jail, lol. :mrgreen:

But than there was another person on here who recommended me another repairman, a great repairman, :)ended up he lives less than 20 minutes from my house, and he overhauled the whole horn for me, charged me only 200 bucks, and now the horn plays great!...so I got lucky!

Also the first repairman told me that he would complete the overhaul for me in 2 weeks max, ended up it took him a little over 9 weeks to complete the job. The 2nd repairman, I took my horn in to him on a Thursday, it was finished the following Tuesday, so 5 days total...pm me if you want and I can tell you who is/was the crappy repairman not to go too, and who was the great repairman, or if everyone want's to know, I'll go ahead and post the repairman's info on here.
 

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Please at least post the name of the good tech.
 

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You got it!...Saul Yanez, is the good tech, this guy used to work for Jim Scimonetti, a good friend of mine...I've been to Saul before but lost his contact info, don't know if I'm supposed to leave his cell # or not...Anyway, he did an amazing job on my horn, even fixed the leak I had on the neck. A big thanks to Mr. Yanez!...he does amazing work, and I've been to most of the techs in LA, he's one of the best for sure!
 

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'He put back all the old corks and felts on the horn'

In reality he most likely never took them off. It is highly unlikely that the corks could survive being removed, and its virtually impossible to put them back just like they were anyway, so adjustments would still be needed.
I can relate to what you went through with that guy because I've had similar results basically every time I've had major work done on a sax. I have a tenor in for an overhaul now and I'm very hopeful I won't have to tear it down and redo everything when I get it back. This job has some minor dents to remove along with key play here and there which is why I didn't just go with a pad job.
 

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You got it!...Saul Yanez, is the good tech, this guy used to work for Jim Scimonetti, a good friend of mine...I've been to Saul before but lost his contact info, don't know if I'm supposed to leave his cell # or not...Anyway, he did an amazing job on my horn, even fixed the leak I had on the neck. A big thanks to Mr. Yanez!...he does amazing work, and I've been to most of the techs in LA, he's one of the best for sure!
Thank you. It sounds like he deserves positive recognition for his good work.

Whether to publish the name of the person that failed to meet your expectations is sometimes contentious, so I understand your reluctance.

Be well.
 

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Its always nice to get a full quality rebuild. But, like tires or shoes or other consumables, it might be unnecessary to replace them while they still have life. If you have the money, its not a waste to start the clock on a fresh set of pads on a nice worthy SBA. I love a fresh rebuild, but my thrifty side wins out, and I stretch everything as long as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Its always nice to get a full quality rebuild. But, like tires or shoes or other consumables, it might be unnecessary to replace them while they still have life. If you have the money, its not a waste to start the clock on a fresh set of pads on a nice worthy SBA. I love a fresh rebuild, but my thrifty side wins out, and I stretch everything as long as possible.
Yep, that is exactly why I am asking. On one side I prefer not to spend the money, but I know that it will be nice to start with some fresh new pads. I believe these pads are probably getting close to 15 years (maybe more, 20).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you. It sounds like he deserves positive recognition for his good work.

Whether to publish the name of the person that failed to meet your expectations is sometimes contentious, so I understand your reluctance.

Be well.

Last time I did the overhaul in my VI I took it to Stein On Vine, he did an excellent job and I had my horn back in less than 2 weeks. Definitely a great resource in L.A. area.

Thanks,
 

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Yep, that is exactly why I am asking. On one side I prefer not to spend the money, but I know that it will be nice to start with some fresh new pads. I believe these pads are probably getting close to 15 years (maybe more, 20).
My perspective: If I invest good money in a top quality tenor that I intend to keep, I put in top playing condition so I may enjoy it NOW as well as for years to come.

Enjoy!
 

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I don't own any horns that don't play well (except a Chinese flute someone gave me).
I want to pick it up and just play.
I always go to Bruce Belo for all my horns.
He even took the dents out of a family heirloom silver container made by Faberge.
 

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Bruce Belo is my go-to tech as well. He’s a real artist. What a shop too! If you can find it. It’s almost “by invitation only”. And the only other Formula 1 fanatic that I know.
 

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'He put back all the old corks and felts on the horn'

In reality he most likely never took them off. It is highly unlikely that the corks could survive being removed, and its virtually impossible to put them back just like they were anyway, so adjustments would still be needed.
I can relate to what you went through with that guy because I've had similar results basically every time I've had major work done on a sax. I have a tenor in for an overhaul now and I'm very hopeful I won't have to tear it down and redo everything when I get it back. This job has some minor dents to remove along with key play here and there which is why I didn't just go with a pad job.
Yes exactly, I meant to say that he most likely never took them off, cause they were the same cork and felts on the sax like before when I gave him the horn. My point was that he lied to me when I asked him if he took the horn all apart and thoroughly washed the whole horn inside and out and he replied that he did, than why are the old corks and felts still on the horn?? it's supposed to come with all new materials, I told him.
 

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Anyway this guy was/is a real scumbag, charged me $900 and did a crappy job.

But than there was another person on here who recommended me another repairman, a great repairman, :)ended up he lives less than 20 minutes from my house, and he overhauled the whole horn for me, charged me only 200 bucks, and now the horn plays great!...so I got lucky!
I don't quite understand this.

I get it that the first repair did a bad job and charged $900. Then you took the same horn to someone else who charged $200. So did the 2nd repairer do the exact same work that the first one was supposed to do, ie a complete overhaul and cleaning?

I would hope that if the first repairer did not do things that he said would be done, then did you refuse to pay the full $900? I would certainly not pay if stated work had not been done.
 

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@ Pete: So the 2nd repairman took the horn apart and redid everything that the 1st guy was supposed to do, wash the horn, put new felts, new corks, checked the double-socket neck for leaks which it did have, it was checked with a leak tester special made for checking leaks on the neck, EXCEPT he did not redo the pads, which I liked, and the resonators which I like, which are correct for this horn, according to the 2nd repairman. The pads are Ferrerre's (sp) and the resonators were the correct type used for a King Super 20.

The 2nd repairman said he didn't do anything with the pads, said they were good, they didn't have a smell to them, so he just put them back. I am not a repairman so I don't know if he reseated them a certain way, or what?? I know that he put everything back, got all the clicks and clacking out of the horn so that the key action was nice and smooth, and everything subtone's effortlessly now.

Regarding the payment, this is what happened. They wanted at the store, the owner and the 1st repairman, they wanted up front $450 to start working on the horn, than the other $450 when the horn was completed. Both times a credit card was used. I should have stopped payment on the card, but I didn't know that the horn was going to turn out badly.

I hope I answered your question Pete, if not, I'll try again.
 

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.

Regarding the payment, this is what happened. They wanted at the store, the owner and the 1st repairman, they wanted up front $450 to start working on the horn, than the other $450 when the horn was completed. Both times a credit card was used. I should have stopped payment on the card, but I didn't know that the horn was going to turn out badly.
OK, so they quoted for a complete overhaul with cleaning, new felts and corks, but all they did was a repad. I certainly would not have paid the balance of $450 when the horn was "completed" (but not actually completed as per the original quote).
 
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