Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been playing the tenor for a few years. Last year I changed from a 4c to a Vandoren T5 V25, not knowing a alot about mouthpieces. I was just wondering if this mouthpiece is suitable for jazz, or should I consider changing my mouthpiece?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
434 Posts
Assuming Vandoren v5 T25.....

You have more of a classical mouthpiece. However, that does not men you can’t play jazz with it. If you are just learning jazz, I wouldn’t worry about it right now. Your ability to perforem proper Jazz articulation will far over-shadow the classical nature of the tone quality on that mouthpiece. At some point, when your articulation is developed fully for jazz (if you aren’t already there), you will may decide that your sound doesn’t have enough edge or bite to it. At that point, you might want to try something that is intended for Jazz.

......all that said, if you like the sound of your current Vandoren mouthpiece, there is absolutely no reason to change, even if this mpc isn’t officially jazzy. You wouldn’t be the first person to play Jazz on a classical mouthpiece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
The v5 T25 is a small mouthpiece. Most "Jazz" mouthpieces have bigger openings which will require more air, control, and most likely softer reeds. I think it would make sense to look into jazzier mouthpieces, but it's going to take some work to actually be able to play them. Ideally you could borrow some to play around with. Make sure you have softer reeds available!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
T25 is close to a Otto link #5 head to your neighborhood music store and play test a few rubber pieces and see what you think.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
5,306 Posts
The V16 Vandoren Tenor has more of the Jazz Vibe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
We saxophonists tend to obsess about gear, but really you can play any style of music on any mouthpiece. Joe Henderson was one of the greatest jazz tenor players of all time and he sounded great on a Selmer Soloist, which is usually considered a "classical" piece. And he's not the only one.

If you want to play jazz, play what you have (or something else) and listen to jazz...A LOT.
 

·
Just a guy who plays saxophone.
Joined
·
4,414 Posts
I have a Rico 6M select jazz mouthpiece in the sandstone marbled rubber that I bought new and only trialed for about six hours. It’s a lot of fun to play. I used it in a quartet setting at a jam session, on stage with a loud rock band, and in the room I practice in. Very flexible with plenty of whatever kind of sound you want already inside if you can find it. Want to buy it? I’ll give you a good price bundled with a Marc Jean ligature that fits it perfectly.
 

·
Just a guy who plays saxophone.
Joined
·
4,414 Posts
We saxophonists tend to obsess about gear, but really you can play any style of music on any mouthpiece. Joe Henderson was one of the greatest jazz tenor players of all time and he sounded great on a Selmer Soloist, which is usually considered a "classical" piece. And he's not the only one.

If you want to play jazz, play what you have (or something else) and listen to jazz...A LOT.
Right? I want to play a soloist like Joe, but can’t justify dropping that kind of bread on a real one, but the boutiques are creeping ever closer. I’m happy to settle for being able to call up a Joe-ish sound when I feel like I want to until I come upon the chance to try one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
Right? I want to play a soloist like Joe, but can’t justify dropping that kind of bread on a real one, but the boutiques are creeping ever closer. I’m happy to settle for being able to call up a Joe-ish sound when I feel like I want to until I come upon the chance to try one.
Joe H. certainly had a beautiful sound and I've always tried to move in that direction, too. Of course, that's only one part of the equation. Unfortunately, I'll never have his ideas and technical facility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I agree to the advice of listening to lots of jazz if that's your chosen style, although don't over look funk, r and b, Latin etc. Hone in on favorite players and imitate them. This process can take weeks or months, even years. Get as close to the sound you desire in your head as you can on the current piece. Then slowly begin trying other pieces as you can get your hands on them. Try not to spend lots of money, buy music and learning/ study materials, concert tickets, a good microphone, etc. Believe me, I learned the hard way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I spent many months trying to imitate maceo parker on a buescher true tone mouthpiece in middle school because that's what I had. When my parents finally bought me a Meyer 5 the sound concept was already there. I just gained a few decibels.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top