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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm playing a bassoon piece in the key of E. Suddenly they throw in the tenor clef sign, so for a few measures you're reading tenor clef.

But there is no new key signature associated with the new clef. I assume that it's still in E.

Am I correct?
 

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Yes you are!
One of the skills a bassoonist has to learn - especially in older music.
Mind-blowing if you're a baritone player covering a bassoon part in a wind band and the clef change happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Lonnie.

I thought so, but some things didn't seem to make sense. For example, when it goes into tenor clef, it has a natural sign by an A. But the A isn't sharp in the key of E. But in tenor clef, the A is on the third line up, which is where the D was in bass clef. So I guess they put the natural sign there as a reminder that that note is a natural. (But to me, it just made it more confusing.)
 

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Without seeing the music it is hard to comment, however without a keychange in the music the natural A is is probably a "courtesy" reminder of the change in clef - as you noted.
 
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