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Thanks for the kind words, MrP. Yes, that's my solo on the slow blues in Eb. It was called 'Kansas City Style', or something, and it was my only feature most nights. Slow, felt like 29 bpm. Man, ants moved faster than I was playing!

Jacquet rehearsed everyday on the road, so that's why we were on stage when you got there. The 'sound check' usually started at 2 or 3 in the afternoon, and ran until about 6:30 or 7:00 in the evening, everyday. He wanted things tight, so you rehearsed. Then you had to play the gig.......

Hearing IJ every night was like money in the bank. A saxophone lesson from a master. He really helped me with presentation, how to put things over, how to pull an audience, and to try to always play as cleanly as possible.

Jacquet got hoisted on his own pitard at that Laren gig you mention. We had long travel to get to Laren and IJ wanted to rehearse all day instead of resting and making the gig that night. So we went straight to the venue, Nick Vogelbrects Jazz Cafe, and started to rehearse. We rehearse right up to broadcast time. So we broadcast two long sets and everyone's beat, dog tired by the final tune, 'One O'Clock Jump'. So the rhythm section starts One O'Clock Jump in F. Just as they modulate to Db, you hear that dreadful thud of a saxophone hitting the floor. Jacquet had picked his tenor up off the stand and missed the hook with his neck strap! BLAM! the horn hits the floor! Embarassed, he picks up the horn and somehow forces out the solo in Db. We finish the tune and IJ collapses, totally exausted, into the arms of Brian Sledge, one of the trumpet players. We had to carry his *** back to his dressing room. Fortunately for Jacquet, our next stop was Hamburg, and I was familiar with a pretty good saxophone repair shop in St. Pauli, so he was able to get it running when we got there.
 

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Sorry guys....nothing to add. I just want to say thanks. Especially to mrpeebee. These tales of old horns, mpcs, guys swapping stuff...great. If anybody wants to check IJ...may i recommend..." proper box set 49 "..." The Illinois Jacquet story "....Four cd, plus 40 page book. Thanks again for a great thread....a
 

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Sorry guys....nothing to add. I just want to say thanks.
Same here. Thanks so much to mrpeebee, saxguy1953 and sideC - these kinds of stories are enough on their own to make SOTW worthwhile.

And the clip: now that is what it's all about!! Magnificent.
 

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Rinus totally rips. The Arthur Elgort? short..." Texas Tenor " is a superb work. Atmospheric in a big way. I have always wanted to get " Link friendly ". Have come close, and love those old selmer ligs. That gritty massive subtone....i never have quite got there. Listen to Arnett on the last of mrp's you tube short. That is were i need to be....my personal preference as to how a link really should sound. Seriously; i hope you younger players, are looking at this stuff. This IS what it is all about. Have a great day...a
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks for the nice words Adrian and Rooty. I also enjoy this stuff very very much, but I guess that was already clear :bluewink:!
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Thanks for the kind words, MrP. Yes, that's my solo on the slow blues in Eb. It was called 'Kansas City Style', or something, and it was my only feature most nights. Slow, felt like 29 bpm. Man, ants moved faster than I was playing!
You played the roof of the tent in that solo, very solid and powerful alto sound, great bluesy impro! I plan to digitalize those old cassettes into MP3's before they don't play anymore... Will pm you when I have done that, just to see if you would like to get a copy. But it can take a while before I can do that, very busy person... But I won't forget!

PS. I played at the same Meer Jazz Festival with my band in that time, but in a much smaller tent, and on a much lower level!

Jacquet got hoisted on his own pitard at that Laren gig you mention. We had long travel to get to Laren and IJ wanted to rehearse all day instead of resting and making the gig that night. So we went straight to the venue, Nick Vogelbrects Jazz Cafe, and started to rehearse. We rehearse right up to broadcast time. So we broadcast two long sets and everyone's beat, dog tired by the final tune, 'One O'Clock Jump'. So the rhythm section starts One O'Clock Jump in F. Just as they modulate to Db, you hear that dreadful thud of a saxophone hitting the floor. Jacquet had picked his tenor up off the stand and missed the hook with his neck strap! BLAM! the horn hits the floor! Embarassed, he picks up the horn and somehow forces out the solo in Db. We finish the tune and IJ collapses, totally exausted, into the arms of Brian Sledge, one of the trumpet players. We had to carry his *** back to his dressing room. Fortunately for Jacquet, our next stop was Hamburg, and I was familiar with a pretty good saxophone repair shop in St. Pauli, so he was able to get it running when we got there.
This is again an incredible story! The funny thing is that I played a cassette of this concert for years in my car (now I only have CD/MP3 options, no cassette anymore). I didn't see this concert live, but from my tape I figured out that IJ's tenor jumped on the floor, because I heared the 'bang' and the reactions of the guys in the background. It happened during a piano solo and I can hear that this guy had to stretch his solo for some more chorusses before IJ get it up again. You can even hear IJ playing some test notes in the last bars of the piano solo. And then he begins a short solo, but it's one of my favourites of him. He starts his solo in a Herschel Evans way (Herschel was one of his big examples) and his sound is terrific. I think he plays only 2 chorusses, and in the last bars he goes done to the lower registers where his horn doesn't respond anymore (cracked notes). But I love it, I have a preference for those notes on the edge of the sound! My findings by ear completely match your story above, fantastic! My story is completely from memory, I didn't listen to that tape for years. I have to put this stuff on MP3 soon I guess...

Those long rehearsals must have been killing for the first trumpet player. On the other hand, he always hits the very high notes at the times I heared the band, so he must have had some chops...

Thanks again Mr. sideC for your great inside stories :)!

Peter.
 

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Thanks again for the kind words, MrP. Like I said, I only got one solo a night, so I had to try to do the best I could with it.

Man, I wish I could have heard your band while we were there. I'm sure you guys were sounding good. What was your instrumentation, and what kind of stuff were you doing?

The piano player was my good friend Ed Stoute, straight out of Brooklyn. We still gig together around the NYC area. Jacquet had to keep his solo short, it was a miricle he could get sound out of that horn at all. He was lucky Nick's place had one of those old time wood floors with the planks, so it had a little give when you walked on it. Or when a saxophone hit it!

Winston Byrd played first trumpet in that band, he was just a kid back then and he had chops around the corner. He's coming in from L.A. later this month and I'll pass your complement on to him. He loves complements!

MrP, thanks for giving me a chance to talk about the good old days!
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
He practically lives next door. Did you know he put up a street sign calling his street "Dexter Gordon Plaza"?
I have been at Rinus place (and will visit him again soon), but didn't know that! Funny, real Rinus humor! Nice place to live also. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
Man, I wish I could have heard your band while we were there. I'm sure you guys were sounding good. What was your instrumentation, and what kind of stuff were you doing?
Thanks for asking Mr. sideC :). I played at that time in an amateur band called Bob Session. Bob was our bandleader, a retired professional music teacher who played clarinet, alto and piano. The rest of the band was full time amateur! We mainly tried to play straight ahead jazz. The instrumentation was clarinet/alto/piano (Bob), tenor (me!), baritone, trumpet, vibraphone, guitar, bass and drums (I liked that setting very much).

I have some old recordings of that time (around 1999) on my SoundClick page. Bit reluctant to post the links in this thread full of great professional players, because the quality of the recording and the musicians is by far not up to the other postings in this thread. But anyhow, here are some links:

http://soundclick.com/share.cfm?id=9607310 - Walkin Shoes (studio) - my solo starts around 3:06
http://soundclick.com/share.cfm?id=10037993 - 7 Come 11 (live) - my solo starts around 3:02
http://soundclick.com/share.cfm?id=9607401 - Just A Closer Walk With Thee (live) - feature of me (inspired by Mr. Arnett Cobb)

I played at that time on a Selmer SBA of 1952 with a metal Otto Link Early Babbitt 8* mouthpiece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 · (Edited)
Winston Byrd played first trumpet in that band, he was just a kid back then and he had chops around the corner. He's coming in from L.A. later this month and I'll pass your complement on to him. He loves complements!
Please make it a very BIG compliment to Winston, he really hitted all those high notes in a great way (almost like Cat Anderson did)!

MrP, thanks for giving me a chance to talk about the good old days!
No thanks at all, actually I can't get enough of those good old days stories (I guess the same is valid for the other readers of this thread), thanks again for that.

Talking of old stories... I'm a great fan of Arnett Cobb and happen to know that Illinois played alto with him in the late 30's in the Milton Larkin band. Arnett already played tenor in that time. Hampton offered Cobb the job of first tenor in 1939 (also Basie has asked him to replace Herschel), but he refused both offers. Illinois went to Hampton and had to switch to tenor, with great results as we all know. Later, when IJ left Hampton, Cobb replaced him (in 1942). Now most people think that Cobb is influenced by IJ, but it would be more logic to assume that IJ was inspired by Cobb (being older and playing tenor before IJ did). But I never found any information on IJ mentioning that Arnett was an example or influence for him. I know both had great respect for each other, I could see that clearly during mutual performances of them (have seen them together about 5 times in Holland from 1979 onwards).

Did IJ speak ever to you on how he thought of Arnett?

A fantastic source of information on Arnett Cobb can be found via this link (it contains beautiful stories and old pictures):
http://issuu.com/nicquemont/docs/arnettcobb_booklet_web

Also just found a great performance of Arnett Cobb on YouTube, playing in the Lionel Hampton All Star Big Band in 1978 in The Netherlands. Just check this link if you would like to see it:
http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showth...a-Jazz-Festival-in-1978-featuring-Arnett-Cobb
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Thanks rolltrane, fully agree. Everybody seems to have that LP/CD! We shouldn't forget to mention Roy Eldridge, who is in real great shape at this recording.
 

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Peter, IJ never spoke to me directly of his views of Arnett Cobb. As a matter of fact, these topics were a must to avoid with him. For some reason I don't think he wanted people to know that he was a disciple of Arnett when he was young. Yes, Arnett was out there before IJ, and you can hear the influence Cobb had on Jacquet, but I think Jacquet liked people to think he invented his style without outside influence.

He was not exactly a shrinking violet when it came to the subject of ego.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Nicely phrased Mr. sideC :)! I could have expected something like that, remembering what you wrote on what IJ yelled back at Catherine in Hoofddorp (" **** YOU! I'M THE KING!!!!!"......)!
 

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Thanks for posting this video. IJ sure looks like he is having fun. He sounds great.
Illinois Jacquet plays a great solo on Cottontail with Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra on the album 'Live In Swing City- Swingin' With Duke'. I'd had never really listened to him much until I heard this solo. He plays some really great lines and his tone is massive. The album is on spotify if you want to check it out?
I spoke to Scott Hamilton last year and he mentioned how much he really admired Illinois Jacquet, especially in IJ's later years.
Sorry to mention horns but it looks from pictures like he in fact played a SBA not a BA. Would also be nice to know what size tip he played on his refaced tone master.
 

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