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Still a real Buescher before the Selmer take over , does the S-40 mean it is inferior to former Bueschers ?
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Labeled as the S-40, it precedes the acquisition of Buescher by Selmer USA -- built somewhere between 1961 & '62. After 1965, it became the "1040", essentially unchanged.

Prior to 1960, this was called the Elkhart Model 31A Tenor Saxophone, with it's roots in the Elkhart Band Instrument Co. (EBIC). Many parts have the Buescher look, but it is not a stencil and the horn's design is different from what Buescher produced for its own brands. It became the "Aristocrat" in 1960 when they renamed the line calling the model 141 & 157 Aristocrat altos and tenors as 400's and the previous 400's as Super 400's.

EBIC after WWII and before 1960 was a wholly-owned subsidiary of BBIC (Buescher Band Instrument Co). Prior to then, Buescher was a significant shareholder in the EBIC company and produced many of their components, but EBIC was an independent instrument manufacturer.

EBIC was Buescher's second-line, inexpensive brand. So, the short answer to "is it inferior" to former Bueschers (assuming you mean the ones built before this one) is yes. Still played in tune with a nice sound, but lacks many of the features mainstream Buescher horns of the prior years. Its primary attraction was as a decent instrument for a low price.

Start on page 15 of this: https://saxophone.org/museum/publications/id/576 and you can see where it fits in the 1959 Buescher line-up. The 1960 catalog on this site has the same instruments, just using the new model numbers and branding.
 

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SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
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EBIC was Buescher's second-line, inexpensive brand. So, the short answer to "is it inferior" to former Bueschers (assuming you mean the ones built before this one) is yes. Still played in tune with a nice sound, but lacks many of the features mainstream Buescher horns of the prior years.
There's your answer interinfo. But man, you keep asking all these questions in what seems to be an attempt to get someone to tell you that a super-low priced 'bargain' basement horn will be every bit as good as a top quality vintage Buescher (or Conn, Martin, King, etc) from the period when they were making the best of their line. It just ain't gonna happen.

I've answered your inquiries over and over with the same line. If you want a great Buescher, get one from the '30s to early '50s, either in tip top playing condition or being willing to fork out the extra cash to have it put into tip top condition, and be done with it. Those horns may cost a bit more than the later models, but they are the true bargains, and can be had for a decent price.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Using the Aristocrat label, name of a pro sax for a student sax ?! Pretty cheap ...
Fof all the alledged “research” you’ve been doing about vintage horns, you seem to miss a lot of key themes.
 

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Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2013-2016
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Using the Aristocrat label, name of a pro sax for a student sax ?! Pretty cheap ...
Yes. You should see the “Aristocrats” they make now. The Buescher Aristocrat name is still around, you know.


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Using the Aristocrat label, name of a pro sax for a student sax ?! Pretty cheap ...
I just told you, but for clarity will say it again. 1930s to the early 1950s Aristocrat. As I said in other threads, the script-engraved 156 Aristocrat generally goes for less than the Big B engraved 156 Aristocrat, although it's the exact same horn aside from the engraving. So you might find some savings there. As to 'pretty cheap,' it's all relative. For what you are getting (top quality, great horn), the market price of an Aristocrat in good playing condition from that era, is a bargain, even though it will cost more than a Bundy or a post-buyout so-called "Aristocrat."

p.s. The Aristocrats from the era I speak of are pro horns. I don't know what you mean by "pro sax for a student sax."
 
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