Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I have an audition approaching, on Saturday of next week, and have a single pad (high E key) that needs to be replaced. It is a VERY dark brown, and the part that directly touches the keyhole of the saxophone is completely worn away. It does not seal all the way because of this, therefore impacting my sound rather heavily, adding a squeaking, multiphonic type sound to some notes, especially the higher register.

The closest woodwind repair shop is abut an hour away, and I am not sure I have time to go there before this audition. Is there anything I can use to improve the seal on the pad, so the sound is normal?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
8,692 Posts
Being such a small pad on a sprung closed key, you may get away with temporarily replacing with a piece of cork cut and sanded to fit.
If fitted with a liberal amount of shellac, you should be able to float it easily enough.
Have heard of others using a piece of plastic wrap over the pad to get by in a pinch too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Shoot, I cut a piece of leather from an old tool pouch to replace a D palm pad once. :) Lasted, well probably would still be working though I brought it to my tech 3-4 weeks later.....
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
42,158 Posts
the easiest fix is cling film, just take apiece and wrap tightly the pad it will make it airtight and will be soft enough to close

I didn’t invent this , I think it was suggested years ago , I just remember it, I think I first heard of this fix by the great Stephen Howard




The pad is shot, it needs replacing. A temporary fix can be achieved by wrapping cling film over the pad ( twist it up tight on top of the key cup ).

Regards,




Pads shouldn't really tear in 6 months but it wouldn't hurt to take a few spares. You'll need the appropriate glues i.e contact adhesive for corks and felts and hot glue for pads.
Screwdrivers, small round-nosed pliers and a spring hook are useful plus a pair of tweezers. Some blades to cut cork and felt and a few spare bumper felts, disk felts etc might be handy. Some rubber bands can be used if a spring breaks. It's the sort of thing you should have in your case if you are gigging.

Learn how to replace pads then it won't be difficult. If you don't know how then it may be better left until you get back. You can do quick fixes such as placing cling film over the pad. That should help seal it if there is a tear.
a quick fix for a octave pad if you still have the beast is to pop it back in with a little blue-tac.

I Had a picolo player loose a pad on the final rehearsal at the venue, just before a concert. I made a pad from blue tac and covered it in cling film. worked a treat.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,025 Posts
If saran wrap doesn’t work. Do you have a spare neck cork ?
Remove the key, look to see how much of the pad is protruding from the cup. Is it level or protruding a couple millimeter? heat and get the old pad out.
Measure the thickness. Should be somewhere around .160 thick
The cork is about .064. You will need to glue two layers together. Maybe 3 at least 20 mm square. The pad is somewhere around 18 mm in diameter. rest the key cup on top of the cork and draw the circle. Cut the circle out using a very sharp new razor blade. Keep the edges very vertical/square. Gently sanded until it fits the cup. If you don’t have shellac use a little hobby hot melt glue. Depending on how thick you made the cork will determine the layer of glue. Install the key. Check the fit. You can do this with a leak light or thin strips of paper from a shoebox. 1/8 wide x 2”long. Open the key insert the paper close key. in different spots around the circumference. Pull on the paper gently and feel the tension all the way around. Should be even. In a very dark room a Small flashlight May work as a leak light.
You may need to reheat it and float the pad inplace untill it seeks a natural level to seal. Be careful you do not burn the surrounding pads. Something like a high output butane lighter will work. It doesn’t take much !
Good luck with the audition!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
If you don't need to go up to that range for the audition just put a piece of tape over the tone hole.
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,869 Posts
the easiest fix is cling film, just take apiece and wrap tightly the pad it will make it airtight and will be soft enough to close.
This should do the job for a temporary fix. Easy to try it and find out. If it works, you're all set temporarily. If you have to go to any major trouble to try and fix it, you may spend more time doing that than the hour-long drive to your tech, who can fix it properly in a matter of minutes. I'd try to carve out the time to get it to your tech, but otherwise what milandro (and some others) suggested should work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@Joopes so how did the audition go ?
It went well! I got 3rd chair, which is pretty good (I think) considering that there was 17 people that tried out. I did just get braces today though, so I am honestly not sure how well I will be able to play at the clinic in 2 weeks. Can't even barely swallow right now, lol.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,025 Posts
It went well! I got 3rd chair, which is pretty good (I think) considering that there was 17 people that tried out. I did just get braces today though, so I am honestly not sure how well I will be able to play at the clinic in 2 weeks. Can't even barely swallow right now, lol.
Well congratulations! Looks like you have a couple of weeks to overcome the next challenge. Best of luck !
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top