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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a student who brought in a Conn with what I believe the serial number to be "M 212XXX" Looking at the serial number charts I was a little confused. It looked like 1928, but a different chart said something very different. It's an alto, golden brass. Rolled tone holes. The low Bb/B pads are on opposite sides of the horn. It's got an extra key in the right hand for I believe G# as well as an extra small pad behind the lower stack. Thanks for your help.
 

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212XXX should indeed be a '28, which would make it a New Wonder II (AKA Chu Berry).

What else would you like to know :)? They're good playing saxes, I have a couple of them myself.
 

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Make sure you have a woodwind serial list. Some web pages only have the brass list - because there is a lot more interest in Conn brasses than saxes (I wish it weren't the case!!).

The woodwind list would date 212xxx to 1928. The brass list would date it to 1925, whereas a 1925 sax or woodwind would be numbered 1454xx–1679xx.

Your horn matches the description of a 1928 alto. The extra small pad is for trilling D to Eb, by lifting the right middle finger. These are prone to leak, so some prefer them corked or sprung shut.

The model is the New Wonder, today called series 2 because changes were made from earlier New Wonder saxes in 1924. They're also known as Chu Berrys, after the tenorist who used a Conn of this vintage.

These are very special instruments with a big versatile sound, altho some find the action heavy for an alto. They also are very flexible in intonation, which can be a problem if you're coming from modern instruments.
 

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Make sure you have a woodwind serial list. Some web pages only have the brass list - because there is a lot more interest in Conn brasses than saxes (I wish it weren't the case!!).
Just make sure you ignore the #'s on that list between 1970-1986, since it's wrong ;)

But, yes....a pretty nice horn you have there. I echo what Paul and VSG say above....except don't cork the Eb Fork key shut. Yes, folks do that all the time...but heck, it's there and it's pretty useful... and it's something most Saxes don't have. So, use it.

A decent tech should really be able to get it functioning properly in about 4 minutes if it is causing problems....
 

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Just make sure you ignore the #'s on that list between 1970-1986, since it's wrong ;)
Is there a right one? or is that privileged information? As if owning a 1970-86 Conn saxophone is any kind of a "privilege." *snerk*
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks a lot for all the great information. It is not silver plated, nor does it have a tuning neck, fyi. You may be surprised to learn the student is actually a beginner, 4th grade girl, getting a jump start on beginning band next year. But the horn is in good shape and she takes good care of it. She's only been playing a few months but has a heck of a sound(absolutely HUGE), even on a Yamaha 4C.
 
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