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I know it is not a permanent solution but I just refurbished a 1901 Conn alto and the neck receiver is too loose (it looks like the original neck but who knows). My go-to tech is on vacation and he is the only one I would trust with an expander so for the purpose of just test playing the horn I used teflon tape and it actually works better than I expected. It's only 1 1/2 wraps and like I said, this is a temporary solution that may impact the voice of the horn but it works, the horn even plays surprisingly well in tune. Also, the tape actually stays on with the neck removed.


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I used to always have Teflon tape in my case along with waxed dental floss for the cork and various other strange things, in case something happened on the gig. I used Teflon on the neck receiver many times. Always worked well for me. 馃榾
 

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I used teflon tape on my tenor tenon for awhile, until I could get my tech to expand the tenon. He did a good job with the expander, and it fits well. To be honest, it now sounds exactly like it did when I was using tape.
 

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I used teflon tape on my tenor tenon for awhile, until I could get my tech to expand the tenon. He did a good job with the expander, and it fits well. To be honest, it now sounds exactly like it did when I was using tape.
Good to know, I kinda expected that but this horn has such a unique sound to begin with (no resos at all on purpose) that I wasn't sure if there was a tape component.
 

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Using tape to effect a seal, versus having the tenon properly expanded to fit closely, won't have any effect on sound. What will potentially have an effect is letting it be leaky.

I suspect that as long as you're willing to fool with the tape, it will be fine. I can't see how using the tape long term could harm the instrument in any way. Just the trouble to re-wrap it when it gets chewed up.
 

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I鈥檝e had to do it and it does stay on for a while especially if you just have to use a little.
My tenor neck has just a little rocking in it but the tape is a good fix quick and the sax plays a lot better.
It definitely brightened it up.
 

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I used teflon tape on my tenor tenon for awhile, until I could get my tech to expand the tenon. He did a good job with the expander, and it fits well. To be honest, it now sounds exactly like it did when I was using tape.
Then you got lucky and had an adequate seal with the tape.

As one of my colleagues once shared with me, "Better lucky than good!". (He was also very good.)
 

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"Got lucky" ? If you wind the teflon tape on properly, especially the yellow gas tape, there's no luck whatever involved. I've an old Conn alto that has had teflon tape on its neck for a couple of years now with no ill effect. It works beautifully. I won't bother getting the neck expanded until the instrument's due for a repad.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
A typical neck fitting in my shop costs $15-$25 and can often be done while you wait. Why not get it done right so you don't have to bother with it? ;)
Yes, that is the plan but my go-to tech is out of town until next week and I needed a temporary fix for all the other adjustments (complete repad, corks etc.). This is the lightest alto I have ever seen (1800 g for the fully assembled body) and I wanted to hear what it sounds like. Next week, it'll go to the shop for neck fitting.
 

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Peel-and-stick metallic duct tape has worked for me.
 

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"Got lucky" ? If you wind the teflon tape on properly, especially the yellow gas tape, there's no luck whatever involved. I've an old Conn alto that has had teflon tape on its neck for a couple of years now with no ill effect. It works beautifully. I won't bother getting the neck expanded until the instrument's due for a repad.
Yes, "got lucky" as in the gap was large enough for teflon tape to work. "Got lucky" as in the tenon wasn't an oval with a gap on one side, and an interference fit on the other. A tapered tenon is another common PITA.

A correctly fitted neck tenon is a beautiful thing.
 

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Is there really a point to arguing about which tape or other remedy to use for a few days or so? ... .
Yes.

Peel-and-stick metallic duct tape has worked for me.
If duct tape fits in there it is hell of a loose. If the duct tape is not the perfect thickness, then it will either leak or you will not get the joint together.
If one round is not enough then 2 is almost certain to be too much. 1 1/2 rounds invites a leak.

Teflon tape is far thinner and far more forgiving, hence far better for this sort of band-aid.
 

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I used Teflon tape on a Martin neck for at least a year before I got around to adjusting the tenon. Adjustment is a bit more complex on a Martin, and the tape would work for a month before it fell off (second picture). I should say it would work for a month once the Teflon got "wiped on to" the tenon properly. That sometimes took two tries. Because of the Martin's neck attachment method, it is difficult to slowly twist on the neck in one direction (the opposite direction of the tape winding) while inserting. That's the secret.

Another Teflon fix-it is to twist the tape into a thin thread and wind it around the top of the tenon. Also stick a little bit of it into the tensioning slot (fourth picture). That creates an effective gasket in both places. If this works for you, it is less fiddly than carefully keeping the thin film of Teflon wrapped around the entire tenon. The thin thread of Teflon might extend the neck .015 mm, which will lower pitch by 2 MHz, which will require moving your mouthpiece .8 mm. If that thought bothers you, you will definitely hear a huge difference when using Teflon.

Tenon adjustment is possible as a DIY project. The fix is as scary as it looks.

Mark
 
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