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...the only pearls i have ever liked on a sax are the OLD worn down nicely rounded selmer pearls...anything concave...can't stand it....

my New King has just enough of a lip to bug me...especially on the b key when I want to slide down to the bis.

dremel? too worried about going too far and getting into the metal

...so I figure ill start with a little rougher grit sandpaper(where should i start numberwise) and just take my time while watching TV to get the edges down,and then get progressively finer....
 

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It's the acidity in your fingers that wears them down in the first place. You should be able to speed up the process with another acidic material, then stop the wear with an anti acidic cleaner. Maybe I'm just over thinking it! I just get used the pearls I play on.
 

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dremel + diamond disc. Low speed. Wear a respirator mask, pearl dust is killer for your lungs. Then smooth it out with 500 grit sandpaper then one of these cool fancy fingernails sandstick that has the 3 grits color coded.
 

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I would glue down some 400-600 Wet-or-dry paper to a hard surface and 'float' the pearl down w/ naptha lubricant... If you intend re-working ALL of your pearls, extreme care with a Dremel will save you hours of tedium... BTW, please don't 'start' w/ a rough grit abrasive to hurry up! That'll only be a hurry up to damage your horn!!
 

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Or a micromotor for much better control and precision :)
But after grinding/sanding pearls (whole sax) a few times before... not sure I'd do it again...
I have an electronic digital speed control Dremel. It's even better than a micromotor. It's in fact a stepper motor with torque adjustment so you don't lose speed when the tool sees load.
 

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I have an electronic digital speed control Dremel. It's even better than a micromotor. It's in fact a stepper motor with torque adjustment so you don't lose speed when the tool sees load.
Can you explain what that is and how it is better than a micromotor?
Is the handpiece different from a regular dremel? In what way?
The micromotor (at least mine) has high torque at slow speeds. This is part of a good micromotor.
 

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Well that's it, the big dremel with digital speed control IS a micromotor. Goes as low as 5000 rpm (wich is low low for a dremel) and has full torque all over the speed range. If the tool "catches" it raises torque to keep up the speed. A little tricky to master, but effective once you've played enough with it. Like a micromotor. I say it's better because it's heftier and has more power than a dental micromotor (wich I also have and it's really nice for the smaller chores in the shop, like MPC's, small works, etc. The dremel digital speed control is great for shaping key parts, cutting things, using heavy attachements, etc.
 
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