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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I ordered a needle spring to replace the G key spring on one or my sopranos. My bad ( I need a new caliper ), I ordered a bigger size than what I needed. Approximately 25 thousands too large. OK, the best thing to do is ordering a new one but it will take time.

It would be a child play for me to downsize the pring on my metal lathe. It's a blue steel spring. My question: is it a waist of time? Will it weaken the strenght and action of the spring?

Thanks for your help! JO
 

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I think i am pretty good with a lathe and milling machine, got 6 lathes in fact, i could never envision lathing down a straight spring, everyone has different skill sets, would love to see the end result.

If you do it, photos please

To your original question, so long as you dont get it hot enough to remove any of the hardening, it should be fine.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Steve, thanks for your comment. Actually I won't use any lathe bit to do it. I think about using diamond sanding file set on the grip of the lathe. Kind of weird set up but it should work. ANd yes I will take care to not overheat the spring to remove the hardness. I do blades too!!
 

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Even if you can file the spring down enough to fit in the post it is still going to be a makeshift repair and it will tend to rust or corrode more quickly. I would suggest taking the soprano into a repair shop and paying them to replace the spring with one the proper size.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Even if you can file the spring down enough to fit in the post it is still going to be a makeshift repair and it will tend to rust or corrode more quickly. I would suggest taking the soprano into a repair shop and paying them to replace the spring with one the proper size.
Sure, I'm talking about a very temporary fix. The nearest brass shop is close to 100 miles from my home and I don't expect to go there for the 2 next weeks. My question was posted mainly to know if this fix is possible. I won't spend a minute on it if a tech says the spring will break as soon as I'll try to bend it. That's all.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
K, your talking about grinding it down, yes i grind small parts downall the time

I have a small dedicated lathe for grinding drill rod for making screws

Steve
Yes, that's it. As soon as I can stop to the brass shop I'll grab the right size of spring. Blue steel spring have a tendency to rust compared to ss spring. Not sure it will rust faster if the material have been grinded.
 

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Why not just order the size you need from music medic,I believe they sell singles. Springs are cheap, not really worth the time to modify Not sure what the shipping would be to you.
 

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My question: is it a waist of time? Will it weaken the strenght and action of the spring?
It depends. Since you can do it, we don't know how long it would take you and how much time you are willing to invest in this so it works until you can get the correct spring... only you can decide :)

The bluing usually helps to protect against rust. It's pretty variable so some springs rust more than others (also depending on conditions like area, players, etc.). There are a few methods to blue steel. They used to just become blue because of the temp they were tempered in. I think that's why most of them are still blue(ish) but don't know (some products use a bluing liquid). You might be able to blue it yourself after grinding. If it's only for a couple of weeks I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Done and it works well. I didn't bother of bluing the steel. Now that I have the right measurement I'll grab the right spring as soon as I can go to the brass shop. Thanks for your help.
 

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Perhaps worth mentioning: If the end result is not as polished as the original, then it will be more likely to break, especially near the post.
 
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