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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, I recently started noticing that the lacquer was getting kind of cloudy in some areas, specifically on the brass plated parts. I'm not sure how else to describe this, but I will attach a picture. It's not a big deal, but I really would be interested in the reason why this is happening and how to stop it.
Thanks a bunch.
View attachment 40059
 

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.....sigh... not all plating jobs are equal..... i would really say dont worry about!! dont let your horn turn green! keep it clean.... but little stuff like that isnt the end of the world... especially on a part of the horn that your touching consistantly.
 

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What makes you write that your saxophone is "brass plated?" What exactly IS that? Most saxophones are brass - period. Occasionally you'll find them in bronze and solid-silver. And most times with new horns regardless of the finish (bare-brass or some sort of plating - silver or gold) the horn will have a clear-coat of lacquer over the finish to protect it from wear and the elements. Yes, there are exceptions.

Your issue is lacquer wearing off some surfaces, that's all. You didn't mention the brand or model of your saxophone, but on several of my Yanagisawas, especially sopranos, I've experienced some lacquer-wear on various parts of the horns, including the most-used touches, the long rods where one's hands touch the rods consistently, and even on the tube itself. It happens . . . when the wear creates a rough feel, I use a polishing cloth to clean up the places where I feel that roughness (key touches), which means that a once-lacquered touch is now bare-brass but at least it doesn't feel rough to the fingers. DAVE
 

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Yes, it looks like you have just worn the lacquer off.
Poor lacquer is a likely issue. (You'd struggle to wear the lacquer off a student Yamaha!)
Another factor could be if the skin of your fingers has abrasive material on/in it. (You could be a brick who does not wear gloves?)

I have worked on some cheap brands where most of the lacquer is off within a year or two. And even on some pro brands, the lacquer choice is nowhere near as durable as a student Yamaha. I wonder why? Does it just look better for selling?

But if the rubbing of your fingers have worn those patches, it is likely to keep those patches relatively polished as well.
You could touch-up with nail polish but it will not look perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ah I see where I went wrong. The thing is, there is no worn lacquer. The lacquer is all there, the picture just made it look like the lacquer was coming off. Also, how would it be wearing off on the rods if I barely even touch them? The way I took this picture made it look differently than it is, and I apologize for this. I will post a better picture soon.
 

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Lacquer's a funny thing. I had my Mark 6 re-lacquered in 1974, by 76 it was almost totally gone (could have been lousy surface prep or my particular body chemistry being acidic). My 1964 Conn Director (Shooting Star) and my 1990 Yamaha YSS-62 and YTS-62, however, have 100% lacquer coverage (except for scratches and wear spots). Yamaha uses the epoxy lacquer which could probably withstand acid baths. Don't know about the Conn. Maybe your issue is a chemical reaction causing the fogginess.
 
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