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This new thread is intended for varying purposes such as 'How to identify a Couturier saxophone on poor photos or what is a satisfying setup for my Couturier sax or how to play altissimo or just presenting 'My Couturier Saxophone' etc.

I hope you will enjoy talking together.
 

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Discussion Starter #2

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"sn 18242, ... .The sax has a stenciled engraving on the front of the horn that has the words "american professional" with a flowery pattern surrounding.The letter C is engraved above the sn and the letter L below ...".

The item description alone is a 100% indication that this saxophone is a Couturier saxophone, see #68 "The Forgotten American Manufacturer". Agreed?

Assumed you have nothing like the first one of the sellers photos for diagnostic analysis. Is it still possible to identify the manufacturer without any doubt?

What do you think?
 

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Hi Bruce Bailey,

I am very happy that you chime in here. To look for the concave G# lever is a very good advice. You will find this type on SN ca. 16,500 +.

Assumed you have only this photo you won't know the serial number. I am not sure if one is able to identify the concave G# lever on a photo like this one - nevertheless it is surely there.

http://i546.photobucket.com/albums/hh411/LaPorte1922/Bildschirmfoto2011-06-1821-37-56.jpg

Here is a hint: The combination of two characteristics clearly seen on the photo takes you to the manufacturer.
 

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The first characteristic is the tonehole-design. We have four types of thick soldered-on toneholes with a distinctly different design:

1. Gronert-type: not bevelled
2. Couturier-type: bevelled; angle ca. 45 degree
3. Martin-type: bevelled; angle ca. 45 degree; usually with a concave slope
4. Grand-Rapids-type: bevelled; angle ca. 60 degree with a large, slightly concave slope



Looking at low Bb on the photo we note that 2. Couturier- or 3. Martin-type comes into question. Which of the two cannot clearly be ascertained.

Agreed?

If so the C melody saxophone could be made by Couturier (at least with Couturier tools) or Martin.

That is why we need a second distinction.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Here is a detail of the LH stack keys on

a Martin 'handcraft' C melody saxophone:



and the C melody above:



Note the position of the Bb key touches.

The photos are really fuzzy, aren't they?

I will take better ones soon.
 
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