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Discussion Starter #1
I've been trying to track down the manufacturer of my Orpheo Signature sopranino to find a replacement part. The horn looks like an exact copy of the International Woodwind, Allora, RS Berkeley, etc., which I thought were made by Tenon. However, when I contacted Tenon they replied that they only ever made soprano/alto/tenor for Orpheo.

I've tried contacting the other companies above to see if they'd sell me the part for their own horns, that I could have my tech adjust to fit if necessary, but so far the only company I've heard back from is Tenon.

The horn is solid and well produced. The only part of shoddy craftsmanship I can find is the octave key. The part of the octave key that holds the key height adjustment slider was shaved thin to get around nearby rods, and it snapped the first time I tried to adjust it. The key still works, but I can't adjust the key height, which I think it might need. The part is nickel silver, so regular soldering won't fix it.

So, is there another Taiwanese company that makes sopraninos?

And do many techs do silver soldering/brazing? My local guy can't do it in shop.

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I *think* there used to be one more factory, but I don’t know which one.

If it’s an Orpheo...you might try contacting Pro Winds. Pro Winds is now owned by Dennis Bamber who also used to own Orpheo. He might know.


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Discussion Starter #3
Pro Winds? Huh. I found info that it was somehow associated with Steve Goodson/Saxgourmet, but didn't find the Pro Winds connection. I'll email them. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No dice.
Pro Winds said:
We sold them but bought them from another supplier that went out of business. I have no idea where they came from.
Looks like I'll have to try SaxGourmet. I can't seem to find a "Contact Us" link on the website, but I know SG is all over Facebook.
 

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Silver solder is a good possibility. I've made repairs of this sort by making a "dam" of clay then melting the solder to fill in and thicken (making sure that the join is good between all parts). After cooling the part can be machined to get rid of the excess using a dremel. Some propane lighters (long handle type) are hot enough to do this work as it's not that delicate when doing a "largish" area as compared to trying to work a very small area. Propane lighters are also excellent for pad work.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
...it's not that delicate when doing a "largish" area as compared to trying to work a very small area.
I am sure you have a goldsmith somewhere? They are perfectly capable to solder this.
This would be a very small area, so I guess a jeweler would be the person to ask. I didn't realize brazing/"silver soldering" was a something jewelers did. I have a jeweler who goes to my church, so maybe I can hit him up.
 

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Ask, they are very good at this, one of the best sax technicians in the NL started as a goldsmith, then became a saxophone technician, his solder work is second to none ( other techs say that too)
 

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Jewelers (who make jewelry) are a great suggestion. Silly me thinks in terms of what can I do myself rather than who can I get to do this. I've just re machined the pinky cluster of a R&C tenor that is a wonderful instrument, but had a manufacturing defect. Got it relatively cheaply so the hour and a half was well spent. Understandably not everyone can do this sort of thing, or has the equipment, but it's surprising how many things we can fix ourselves with very basic everyday tools.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, it looks like I'm going to try the jeweler route. If that doesn't work, I may have to make the trip to Philly or New York, about 2-2.5 hours' drive away. I really don't want to ship the thing if I can avoid it, although if I have to ship a horn, sopranino's the way to go.

And I'm still having no luck pinning down who actually manufactured the thing. Spoke with Steve Goodson today, and he didn't know who made it. It's not that important, but now I'm determined to find out something about this horn.
 

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Well, does it matter who made it?

At the time when I sold the Sagacious branded (only one was ever made) sopranino to Whamptoncourt there were only 2 factories making sopranino saxophones on Taiwan (not one of them was owned by Tenon then) and only one which would make the Selmer clone.

They are not normally accessible for the public and they work mostly for other companies which complete their range like that. It is way easier to have this fixed than , even with my contacts on Taiwan, to explain anyone which part needs to be shipped.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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Discussion Starter #13
UPDATE: Literally the day after I decided to go the jeweler route, the fine people at Tenon came through. Even though they didn't make the horn, they offered to sell their version of the part. $27 shipped, and I got an identical octave key. Fits like a glove. However, I can see why the original part was shaved down so thin. I might have to (carefully) do the same with the new one. All in all, I'm quite pleased.

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Congratulations! I think it is amazing that you were able to get a replacement part from a Asian manufacturer.
 
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