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I have owned my Yani T902 for over a decade now and overall I have been pleased with the horn. However, I brought it in for an adjustment because I was having a lot of trouble getting the low notes (B, Bb) to speak. This is the second time this has happened in the last few years. The last time I brought it in the tech said it appeared the bell had shifted slightly relative to the body. I brought it to the same shop (different tech, the other tech has since left) and he said that again, the bell had shifted slightly relative to the body. The tech then had me hold the bell and he held the body. He moved the body back and forth and there was an obvious small shift between the bell and body. He said that this particular brace is not sufficient to prevent movement. I was very surprised as Yanis are known for excellent build quality. The brace is similar to the three point brace used on most modern horns. Has anyone else had this problem? The tech said that there is no way to prevent movement unless I solder it together. Is this necessary? Otherwise, he said I need to be extra careful about not grabbing the horn by the bell and be very careful when I take it on and off a stand. The only issues I have had with my Yani are that the octave pip on the body tube popped into the body and needed to be resoldered and that the lacquer has worn much faster than I expected.
 

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Certainly, soldering is a 'tried and true' approach to stabilizing a saxophone, however it is much more difficult to reverse. My understanding is that the removable collars were 'invented' to provide ease of cleaning and overhauling the saxophone. I find it quite convenient to disassemble this joint during overhauls...often there is corrosion in the joints. For some time now, with customer's approval, I have done the following:
1. Clean the joints very carefully, removing all rust and lacquer from the sealing surfaces and polishing them as much as possible
2. Clean the clamp, particularly the screw threads, and use a high quality grease that let the threads run smoothly. I do the same with the brace screws.
3. Fit the joint carefully.
4. At assembly, I use a high quality silicone sealant (I use the Dow-Corning material), put a thin film on both parts, and fit the joint, while it is still fluid, I assemble the brace and clamp and tighten. I reach through the Eb tonehole with a gloved finger and clean cloth and wipe the excess flat so the bore is smooth. Then I set the assembly aside for several hours to set without disturbing it. This makes a stable assembly that has a bit of resilience to the typical knocks. I have 2 Yani tenors, 2 altos and a baritone that have all been perfect for >10 years with this setup. My main tenor has been disassembled and reassembled once...it was no problem, just a little bit of heat and then scrape the adhesive off with a plastic scraper (shop-made).
 

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I'd start by soldering the bell to body brace down, if it's one of those that just uses screws. That's easy to take off if needed at some point in the future. If that's not sufficient then soldering the tube joint(s) is the next step. Once that's done it should be dead solid.

Yes, it will be more troublesome should it ever need to be taken apart, but I will say that in 40 years of playing saxophone I have never yet needed a repair where the bell needed to come off. Even if it had happened twice in that time (which I propose would be unusual) I'd still rather have had the thing secured reliably.

Technicians, who have to do bell-off repairs fairly often, may well argue with this viewpoint, and I can understand that, but that's my take on it from the player's perspective.
 
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