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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I bought (and may return) a T992. A little background: I've been playing a Yamaha YTS-475 about 3 hours a day for the past two months. On the T992, E3 played with the front F key is *really* sharp, whereas F3 is normally pitched. So playing one after the other sounds awful. I had my instructor play the T992 and he loved it. Said if he had to buy a new horn, he'd buy the T992. He also said one off note isn't a big deal, but to me it's irksome. I guess my question is, Am I making too much out one bad note? Is it possible to smooth it out with technique?

What I may get instead is the 82Z. It's a lot more comfortable in my hands partly because I'm used to the yamaha brand, and because the stretch from the front F to the low Bb isn't as far. It's hard for me to stretch my fingers that far. I haven't found any comparisons between the two saxes, so they must not be considered similar.

I played the lacquered 82Z and the T992 side by side today for two solid hours - basically scales and stuff. The front E3 on the 82Z sounds shiotty, just as it does on the T992, but it isn't sharp at all on the 82Z.

Inescapable conclusion: The yani is more powerful or resonant or something. I was feeling the power as much as, or perhaps more than, hearing it - which is nice. I like to "buzz". I didn't buzz nearly as much with the 82Z.

That's probably enough blathering for now. Any general newbie advice will be appreciated. It isn't possible to insult my intelligence.
 

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I have a T990 and an 82Z. You're splitting hairs. They're both great horns. I maintain that the Z is a better horn in the upper register and altissimo and the Yanagisawa better in the midrange and below. The only reason I know each's shortcomings is because I have both. Otherwise I'd be more than happy with each of them exclusively if I had to... :)

Keep the T992, it's a wonderful horn.
 

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Hi, I bought (and may return) a T992. A little background: I've been playing a Yamaha YTS-475 about 3 hours a day for the past two months. On the T992, E3 played with the front F key is *really* sharp, whereas F3 is normally pitched. So playing one after the other sounds awful. I had my instructor play the T992 and he loved it. Said if he had to buy a new horn, he'd buy the T992. He also said one off note isn't a big deal, but to me it's irksome. I guess my question is, Am I making too much out one bad note? Is it possible to smooth it out with technique?

What I may get instead is the 82Z. It's a lot more comfortable in my hands partly because I'm used to the yamaha brand, and because the stretch from the front F to the low Bb isn't as far. It's hard for me to stretch my fingers that far. I haven't found any comparisons between the two saxes, so they must not be considered similar.

I played the lacquered 82Z and the T992 side by side today for two solid hours - basically scales and stuff. The front E3 on the 82Z sounds shiotty, just as it does on the T992, but it isn't sharp at all on the 82Z.

Inescapable conclusion: The yani is more powerful or resonant or something. I was feeling the power as much as, or perhaps more than, hearing it - which is nice. I like to "buzz". I didn't buzz nearly as much with the 82Z.

That's probably enough blathering for now. Any general newbie advice will be appreciated. It isn't possible to insult my intelligence.
Can you be happy playing the "E" the other way?

If so keep the 992 because it's the one that sings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for getting back to me, guys. I urgently need information and this helps a lot.

I maintain that the Z is a better horn in the upper register and altissimo and the Yanagisawa better in the midrange and below.
I totally agree with that.

The only reason I know each's shortcomings is because I have both.
I've ordered an unlacquered Z with the intention of returning either it or the T992, but one possibility is keeping both of them. Would there be any advantage to that beyond the obvious having a backup while one is adjusted? Would it be confusing switching back and forth?

On a related note, the palm D key is about a half inch more elevated on the Yamaha than on the Yanagisawa, and fits into my palm much better. I like to keep my left pinky anchored on the three way meeting point of the low Bb, B, and C# keys. And I like to keep my left index touching the B and "front F" keys. On the T992, I have to lower my palm to reach the palm D key, and in doing so I have to either lose contact with the front F key or the low Bb and C# keys.

Someone recommended Lee's Saxworks as a place that could install a key elevator so I'll look into that.

Keep the T992, it's a wonderful horn.
Yes, I think with an elevated palm D key it would be just about perfect for me.

One other thing. I removed the thumb hook because it was just aggravating my thumb knuckle. If there's a reason to keep the thumb hook on, please let me know. Maybe it would take some tension off the neck strap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Can you be happy playing the "E" the other way?
Yes, but, for example, if you need to jump from high Bb (using the side Bb key) to high E, you can't use the E side key. You can't jump from the side Bb key to the side E key smoothly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lowering a sharp E3 is a fairly simple matter. Either with key heights or some other means. It's very correctable.
Very interesting. Thanks for that tip. If I have the T992 palm D key elevated, I'll also have the E3 pitch lowered at the same time.
 

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personally I wouldn't have anything altered on the horn, I wouldn't have anything elevated, or lowered, or otherwise.
Go for the horn you like the sound of, which by your description is the T992.
You ask if you're making too much out of one bad note, I'd say yes. And what's to say you can't improve that note with time.
You ask if it's possible to smooth it out with technique, yes of course is. Every sax player does that. If you look at Jerry Bergonzi's youtube videos, there's one where he says the sax is, as an instrument, not perfectly in tune, and that every player make small adjustments to correct the tuning. Play the horn you like, play just that horn, make it yours, and you'll learn where all the notes 'live', and how to make them sound their best.
You say you have a problem playing side Bb and then jumping to the E using the palm keys and side key - well, keep trying, you'll find a way. Try rolling your right hand from the wrist, or working out how you have to do it to make it work for you. If you've ever played clarinet then you'll know that a tricky transition is E to Bb using the top hand thumb and index finger for both notes - but it can be done, and done smoothly, and is done, by rotating both digits at the same time, it's something that is possible, it's hard at first because it feels unnatural, but it can learned, and is perfected. And can be done fast.

I say again, go for the horn you like/love the sound of, if you've found one with a buzz you like, go for that one every time, that's what the sax is all about, because the fingerings, certain notes being sharp, flat, or whatever, you can get around all that. Go for the one that makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. If you go for the one that has better ergos but doesn't have the sound, you'll regret it, because ultimately the sound is everything.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
 

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Hmmm, I have a T880 and the palm keys are already a good height, well a lot higher than on my Selmer anyway. But not a big deal to build them up with epoxy putty if you need to. Also check how far your F pad opens when using the front F key - it should be a bit less than with the regular fingering. There is an adjusting screw that lets you change the venting - it's located on the front F key. Just a thought.

Wish I had a T992, but I think I'm close with the bronze neck on my T880 . . .
 

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I have a T992 and a silver 82Z. Mostly I play my old T880...they are all totally awesome saxophones, it's just that the T992 and 82Z have never been completely torn down and put together 'exactly the way I like them', because I bought them very lightly used. I bought the T880 as a basket case and overhauled it with the express intent of making a horn that I loved to play...put in lots of extra TLC...this echos some of the sentiment above.

Regarding the bronze neck on the T880, it's a negligible difference and the stock neck just feels right, although the sterling Yani neck that I got a while back is the one I use on the T880. It just looks cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hope this helps.
Definitely. I'm absorbing all this like a dry sponge. I've had both of my teachers play the T992 and they both love it so I'm definitely keeping it. I may possibly keep the unlacquered 82Z I'm getting tomorrow as well.

I'm already making plans to have the palm D key elevated on the T992. When I curl my fingers inward to touch my palm, my pinky touches my ring finger and I can't move it more than 1/8 inch away. My hands are kind of instrument maladaptive. No amount of contorting or wrist curling, relaxing, stiffening, etc. allows me to reach the keys while my palm contacts a low altitude palm D key.
 
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