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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know what Harry Hartman reeds are actually made of, and whether there are any health considerations to putting this substance in one's mouth for extended periods of time?

I know that Legere is Food Grade Polypropylene, which is the same thing used in yogurt containers and the like. Can't quite figure out what Hartmans are made of, though.

Thanks.

1/10/19: Edited to correct the composition of Legere reeds. They are Polypropylene, not High Density Polyethylene (HDPE).
 

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Please post the information if you get it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm looking specifically for the substance in which these materials are suspended. HDPE can't be melted beyond a gelatinous blob once it has been manufactured, which makes suspending fabrics in it an unlikely proposition. PET (think plastic soda bottles) has a high melting temperature, but I suppose it could be used. Both of these substances are safe. However, if it is something like epoxy and resin, well, that would be a concern.

I will follow the advice given here and contact them directly, and post the results if I get a reply. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here is the reply I got from Harry Hartman:

Hi Peter,

Fiberreed are made of Epoxy resin, glass and carbon fibers. Some have natural fibers and wood included. It depends on the model. We have made health tests in a laboratory to make sure that it doesn’t harm the health of the user in any way. We only sell products that have passed the tests.

With kind regards,

Harry Hartmann
 

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Sounds harmless, but I personally would not want to put Epoxy resin or carbon fiber in my mouth. My son built something out of carbon fiber once, and it's actually quite dangerous. Think of it like breathing fiberglass dust, but the fibers are much harder and sharper. So if a sliver worked its way out of the resin and into your lip, it would be more unpleasant than a natural cane splinter.

Here's a material safety data sheet for a typical epoxy resin. After it's cured, it's essentially non-toxic, but could cause an allergic reaction. But I know from experience that whatever is used on Rico Plasticover reeds, though apparently safe, makes my lips and tongue numb. So I avoid them.
https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/105-SDS.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
HH doesn't really say exactly what kind of epoxy resin they use. Apparently, some are deemed safe for food contact uses (which is my criteria for judging this, as far as the epoxy is concerned.) Here's a link that I found:

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/cfrsearch.cfm?fr=175.300

And here's a resin manufacturer who's product is deemed food contact safe. (However, dig into the website and you find that the Artresin people warn that it is "not safe for [pet] chew toys." So, caveat emptor, I guess.)*

https://www.artresin.com/blogs/artresin/artresin-is-food-safe-according-to-the-fda

I don't know that this is what HH uses. Just passing it along as I found it on the web. Be nice if they put the actual ingredients on the reed package.
 
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